Sediment? in Wine

Sediment? in Wine

Post by smi.. » Sun, 01 Dec 1996 04:00:00



All,

I have been making wine from kits for about two and a half years.  I have
made very good wine that is enjoyed by all.  Recently, however, I found
that just about all of my red wines (five batches) are dropping sediment
in the bottles after lying down for several months.

This is very unusual because the wine has been racked several times, bulk
aged and filtered as well.  The wine tastes and smells okay, just the
sediment (if that what it is) destroys the appearance.

It is equally strange that all of my whites are perfect, polished wines
and I use the same processes and procedures.

Does anyone have an idea what could be causing this?

Thanks in advance for your advice.

Cheers,

Rand

--
Rand Smith                                   Golf Tournament Software


 
 
 

Sediment? in Wine

Post by greatf.. » Sun, 01 Dec 1996 04:00:00



writes:

Quote:
>that just about all of my red wines (five batches) are dropping sediment
>in the bottles after lying down for several months.

>This is very unusual because the wine has been racked several times, bulk
>aged and filtered as well.  The wine tastes and smells okay, just the
>sediment (if that what it is) destroys the appearance

Some would think it enhances the appearance. This is precipitated tannin,
and it shows that the wine has not been over-refined or stripped of its
character. It is a nuisance, but easily taken care of by standing the
bottles upright for a day or so before opening, and then carefully
decanting. This can make a nice ceremony at table, crystal decanter,
candle, whatever you can come up with by way of incantations or prayers of
gratitude to Bacchus....

Greatferm

 
 
 

Sediment? in Wine

Post by John Soane » Wed, 04 Dec 1996 04:00:00


It's not uncommon for red wines to have sediment after extended storage. It
is likely tannin. The only way to eliminate this is to use a fine .2 micron
pad like commercial wineries do. The drawback is you will lose body, color
and flavor, I would much prefer the sediment.

What you might try is tapping the bottle on a counter to loosen the
sediment and leave it upright for a few days prior to serving. Decant the
wine at serving time. Or if you would like to have your guests admire your
packaging, decant, rinse the bottle and pour the wine back in using a
funnel.



Quote:
> that just about all of my red wines (five batches) are dropping sediment
> in the bottles after lying down for several months.

> This is very unusual because the wine has been racked several times, bulk
> aged and filtered as well.  The wine tastes and smells okay, just the
> sediment (if that what it is) destroys the appearance.

 
 
 

Sediment? in Wine

Post by Jacques Rec » Wed, 04 Dec 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

>writes:

>>that just about all of my red wines (five batches) are dropping sediment
>>in the bottles after lying down for several months.

>>This is very unusual because the wine has been racked several times, bulk
>>aged and filtered as well.  The wine tastes and smells okay, just the
>>sediment (if that what it is) destroys the appearance

>Some would think it enhances the appearance. This is precipitated tannin,
>and it shows that the wine has not been over-refined or stripped of its
>character. It is a nuisance, but easily taken care of by standing the
>bottles upright for a day or so before opening, and then carefully
>decanting. This can make a nice ceremony at table, crystal decanter,
>candle, whatever you can come up with by way of incantations or prayers of
>gratitude to Bacchus....

>Greatferm

I concurr with Greatferm. A wine deposit in red wine bottle means that
the wine is still alive in the bottle and a token that wine is the
most healthy beverage of all. In Europe an old bottle of wine that
does not settle would be very suspiscious. In the USA wine consumers
sometimes expect wine to act like any other dead beverages like soft
drinks. (very unhealthy products, containing caffeine, high doses of
phosphoric acid, coal carbon dioxide, and  + salt to initiate thirst
for a second drink, often made with chlorinated recycled water).
Your deposit, you should be proud of it.Congratulation
Enopion
 
 
 

Sediment? in Wine

Post by Harry A. Demidavicius » Fri, 13 Dec 1996 04:00:00




Quote:

> writes:

> >that just about all of my red wines (five batches) are dropping sediment
> >in the bottles after lying down for several months.

> >This is very unusual because the wine has been racked several times,
bulk
> >aged and filtered as well.  The wine tastes and smells okay, just the
> >sediment (if that what it is) destroys the appearance

> Some would think it enhances the appearance. This is precipitated tannin,
> and it shows that the wine has not been over-refined or stripped of its
> character.  .......

> Greatferm

 I like Greatferm's style.  I will never filter this stuff out again!
Harry Demidavicius