Yeast, yeast, yeast (SUMMARY)

Yeast, yeast, yeast (SUMMARY)

Post by Steve Cre » Wed, 09 Mar 1994 04:31:45



   Thanks to everyone who replied to my question about where to find
yeast.  I found a couple of places by looking in the local Yellow Pages
under (surprise!) "Winemaking Equipment and Supplies."  Another section
with the same places was "Beer Homebrewing Equipment and Supplies."  One
place was a winery's store (there are quite a few wineries in southern
Indiana), and the other also sold garden supplies.  Someone also told me
he had found supplies at a hardware store.

   Here is a summary of what I was told about yeast:

- Since grapes tend to have yeast on the skins, you can let the wine
ferment without adding yeast, but the results can vary greatly.  One
person said such wine turns out either *good* or *bad*.  Also, wine from
kits _must_ have yeast added, I assume because the fruit has been
sterilized before canning.  Other types of fruit are not likely to have
the right kind of yeast already on them, so yeast is needed.

- Yeast for baking bread _can_ be used to make wine, but not at all
recommended.  I tried this some time ago, and ended up with cooking
wine, but not drinking wine.  This wasn't a disaster, however, since I
use lots of wine for cooking.

- The kind of yeast you add determines the *** content of the wine,
and so determines how dry it is.  The higher the *** content, the
drier the wine, since there is less sugar left unfermented.

-       -       -       -       -       -       -       -       -       -
Steve Creps, Indiana University

 
 
 

Yeast, yeast, yeast (SUMMARY)

Post by Keith » Thu, 10 Mar 1994 09:04:25


Quote:

>- The kind of yeast you add determines the *** content of the wine,
>and so determines how dry it is.  The higher the *** content, the
>drier the wine, since there is less sugar left unfermented.
>-       -       -       -       -       -       -       -       -       -
>Steve Creps, Indiana University


You need to be careful with this last observation/comment.  It is only
true with many other conditions applied.

Some yeast are killed (or made dormant) by their waste product (***)
at a lower *** level than others.  For example, given two yeast: yeast
'a' can withstand 12-percent *** and yeast 'b' which can stand
16-percent ***.  Both yeast will produce a dry wine (i.e. all sugar
converted to ***, CO2, and other by-products), if the potential
*** level is 12-percent or less at the start of fermentation.  However
if the potential *** level is 16%, yeast 'a' will cease fermentation
at 12-percent and leave behind residual sugar which yeast 'b' would not.

Most table wine is 11-13 percent *** and either dry or semi-dry.
Dessert wines are generally sweet and also generally have a higher ***
content than table wines.

The point is that the type of yeast does not determine whether or not a
wine is dry, and a dry table wine is not necessarily higher in ***
content.

Keith B.

 
 
 

Yeast, yeast, yeast (SUMMARY)

Post by Brian Lunde » Fri, 11 Mar 1994 05:44:05


Quote:
>Some yeast are killed (or made dormant) by their waste product (***)
>at a lower *** level than others.  For example, given two yeast: yeast
>'a' can withstand 12-percent *** and yeast 'b' which can stand
>Keith B.

It is important to note that yeast tolerance of *** is also affected
by temperature, whatever the strain. Yeast will survive longer under cool
fermentation conditions than warm ones.


* "... and the tenth bowl leads to madness and hurling the furniture." *
*                                                   - Eubulus, 375 BC  *