Bottle Sediment

Bottle Sediment

Post by Robert Tyri » Fri, 19 Jan 2001 12:48:45



I have a batch of Cabernet Sauvignon (Spagnol's Cellar Classic) that has
been in the bottle for about 3 months. I noticed that there is a sediment
deposit in the bottle.There was negligible sediment in the final bulk aging
stage just prior to bottling. I know this is common for red wines but I am
unsure if this is detrimental or not. Should I filter my future batches?
Some sources I have read indicate that red wine should be filtered in order
to prevent bottle sedimentation and other sources indicate that filtering
should be avoided in red wines. Any thoughts?

Rob

 
 
 

Bottle Sediment

Post by Vinbrew Suppl » Fri, 19 Jan 2001 13:37:58


Enjoy your wine as it is and dont sweat the natural vitamins at the bottom
of the bottle.  Filtering is Definatley cool.  but Don't go out of your way
to do it.

Quote:
> deposit in the bottle.There was negligible sediment in the final bulk
aging
> stage just prior to bottling. I know this is common for red wines but I am
> unsure if this is detrimental or not. Should I filter my future batches?
> Some sources I have read indicate that red wine should be filtered in

order

 
 
 

Bottle Sediment

Post by Tom » Fri, 19 Jan 2001 14:15:53



Quote:
> I have a batch of Cabernet Sauvignon (Spagnol's Cellar Classic) that has
> been in the bottle for about 3 months. I noticed that there is a sediment
> deposit in the bottle.There was negligible sediment in the final bulk
aging
> stage just prior to bottling. I know this is common for red wines but I am
> unsure if this is detrimental or not. Should I filter my future batches?
> Some sources I have read indicate that red wine should be filtered in
order
> to prevent bottle sedimentation and other sources indicate that filtering
> should be avoided in red wines. Any thoughts?

Filtration doesn't guarantee that your wine won't throw sediment in the
bottle.  If you're making a dry red wine and it looks clear at bottling, I'd
recommend that you not bother with filtration.  Just be sure to decant it
carefully before you serve it.

Tom S

 
 
 

Bottle Sediment

Post by SchlossGois » Fri, 19 Jan 2001 15:05:32



Quote:
> I have a batch of Cabernet Sauvignon (Spagnol's Cellar Classic) that has
> been in the bottle for about 3 months. I noticed that there is a sediment
> deposit in the bottle.There was negligible sediment in the final bulk
aging
> stage just prior to bottling. I know this is common for red wines but I am
> unsure if this is detrimental or not. Should I filter my future batches?
>...snip...

-----------------

Hi Rob:

Speaking as a convert to Filtration (the DARK SIDE ?) ...YES...YES...YES...

Rapid (100 USgal per hour) , judicious (0.75 or higher ) filtration will
improve _ALL_  red wines.

Prosit:
Ed
--
The Viticulture FAQ & Glossary - http://www.itsmysite.com/vitfaq

          "I like on the table, when we're speaking,
           The light of a bottle of intelligent wine."
                              -Pablo Neruda

 
 
 

Bottle Sediment

Post by Greg Coo » Fri, 19 Jan 2001 23:37:13


My opinion?  If it is tartrates or tannins coming out, it won't hurt a
thing.  If it is yeast and you have a lot of sediment, there is a slight
chance this could cause some off flavors, but I wouldn't worry.  Sediment
does not normally harm red wine.  You didn't say how long you let it bulk
age.  Next time, let it age in the carboy longer and you will get less
sediment.  You can leave it in the carboy for a year or more.  Clearly, if
you had given it another 3 months, the sediment you see in your bottles
would have been in the carboy.

Personally, I would not filter the wine.  Before serving, set your bottle
upright for a few hours to let the sediment settle to the bottom, and decant
it.  This is how red wines are traditionally dealt with.

----Greg

On 1/17/01 9:48 PM, in article

Quote:

> I have a batch of Cabernet Sauvignon (Spagnol's Cellar Classic) that has
> been in the bottle for about 3 months. I noticed that there is a sediment
> deposit in the bottle.There was negligible sediment in the final bulk aging
> stage just prior to bottling. I know this is common for red wines but I am
> unsure if this is detrimental or not. Should I filter my future batches?
> Some sources I have read indicate that red wine should be filtered in order
> to prevent bottle sedimentation and other sources indicate that filtering
> should be avoided in red wines. Any thoughts?

> Rob

 
 
 

Bottle Sediment

Post by Robert Tyri » Sat, 20 Jan 2001 00:13:47


The wine was bulk aged for about 6 months. I have heard that red wines will
often throw a sediment in the bottle regardless of the length of bulk aging.
Is this true?

Rob


Quote:
> My opinion?  If it is tartrates or tannins coming out, it won't hurt a
> thing.  If it is yeast and you have a lot of sediment, there is a slight
> chance this could cause some off flavors, but I wouldn't worry.  Sediment
> does not normally harm red wine.  You didn't say how long you let it bulk
> age.  Next time, let it age in the carboy longer and you will get less
> sediment.  You can leave it in the carboy for a year or more.  Clearly, if
> you had given it another 3 months, the sediment you see in your bottles
> would have been in the carboy.

> Personally, I would not filter the wine.  Before serving, set your bottle
> upright for a few hours to let the sediment settle to the bottom, and
decant
> it.  This is how red wines are traditionally dealt with.

> ----Greg

> On 1/17/01 9:48 PM, in article


> > I have a batch of Cabernet Sauvignon (Spagnol's Cellar Classic) that has
> > been in the bottle for about 3 months. I noticed that there is a
sediment
> > deposit in the bottle.There was negligible sediment in the final bulk
aging
> > stage just prior to bottling. I know this is common for red wines but I
am
> > unsure if this is detrimental or not. Should I filter my future batches?
> > Some sources I have read indicate that red wine should be filtered in
order
> > to prevent bottle sedimentation and other sources indicate that
filtering
> > should be avoided in red wines. Any thoughts?

> > Rob

 
 
 

Bottle Sediment

Post by Casey's Mo » Sat, 20 Jan 2001 02:35:21


Quote:
> I have a batch of Cabernet Sauvignon (Spagnol's Cellar Classic) that has
> been in the bottle for about 3 months. I noticed that there is a sediment
> deposit in the bottle

When you store bottles keep them on their sides, and don't rotate them.

If there is sediment it will form a line on the side of the bottle which is
at the bottom.
There will also be a slight haze of dust on the top of the bottle.

When you choose a bottle to serve: before you take if off the shelf draw a
line in the dust with your finger, it will be faint.  Then when you pour,
turn the bottle over so that the line in the dust is at the bottom, leaving
the line of sediment at the top.  This will enable you to gently pour the
wine off without dislodging the sediment.

Try it, it works!

Lisa

 
 
 

Bottle Sediment

Post by Martin J. Cra » Sat, 20 Jan 2001 03:58:17


Quote:
>The wine was bulk aged for about 6 months. I have heard that red wines will
>often throw a sediment in the bottle regardless of the length of bulk aging.
>Is this true?

Robert:

There are at least two kinds of sediment.  A clear red that has bulk aged for
years may throw a sediment after several more years in the bottle because the
tannins in the wine link up (polymerize?) and eventually become so large that
they fall out of the wine.  This is perfectly acceptable in wines that are
intended to age, and such wines are carefully decanted before drinking to
separate the clear wine from the deposits in the bottle.

A wine (red or white) may also throw a sediment early on, due to miniscule
amounts of suspended yeast or other particulates settling out after
fermentation. This should happen during the bulk aging process - not in the
bottle.  When it happens in the bottle, it usually means that the wine was
bottled too early, and/or the wine had an insufficient number of rackings and
sediment was kicked up from the bottom of the carboy during the bottling
process.  IMHO, 6 months is too early to bottle a red, especially if it hasn't
been filtered.

A third type of sediment may occur with wine that has not been cold stabilized,
but that's another thread.
Salud,
Martin J. Crane

 
 
 

Bottle Sediment

Post by Greg Coo » Sat, 20 Jan 2001 04:12:18


On 1/18/01 9:13 AM, in article

Quote:

> The wine was bulk aged for about 6 months. I have heard that red wines will
> often throw a sediment in the bottle regardless of the length of bulk aging.
> Is this true?

> Rob

Yes.  Given enough time, the tannins polymerize and drop out of solution.
This is one of the ways in which tannins soften over time.  Six months
should be long enough to get rid of most of the yeast.  I wouldn't worry
about your sediment.  As I mentioned before, you can decant your wine before
serving.  Filtering has a high probability of removing flavor components
from your wine.  If you know someone with a filter, you could try filtering
say half a batch and compare the filtered and unfiltered later on down the
line.  This might help you to decide if it's worth it to invest in a filter
system.

----Greg

 
 
 

Bottle Sediment

Post by cb » Sat, 20 Jan 2001 05:03:54


Would it not be better to leave the sediment at the bottom of the
bottle to that the clearer wine pours out over top of it?  I guess it
may depend on how dense the sediment is.

-Chris



Quote:

>> I have a batch of Cabernet Sauvignon (Spagnol's Cellar Classic) that has
>> been in the bottle for about 3 months. I noticed that there is a sediment
>> deposit in the bottle

>When you store bottles keep them on their sides, and don't rotate them.

>If there is sediment it will form a line on the side of the bottle which is
>at the bottom.
>There will also be a slight haze of dust on the top of the bottle.

>When you choose a bottle to serve: before you take if off the shelf draw a
>line in the dust with your finger, it will be faint.  Then when you pour,
>turn the bottle over so that the line in the dust is at the bottom, leaving
>the line of sediment at the top.  This will enable you to gently pour the
>wine off without dislodging the sediment.

>Try it, it works!

>Lisa

 
 
 

Bottle Sediment

Post by RottenGrape » Sat, 20 Jan 2001 06:08:55


Robert,

As has been mentioned by others, there are several reasons that sediment
can form in your bottles. I think the most likely culprit here is either
yeast sediment (not very likely after 6 months of carboy aging) or
tartrates.

I'll bet the temperature in your cellar in the 3 months since you
bottled has been colder than the temperature when you were bulk aging.
This could lead to tartrates precipitating in the bottle. Usually, this
is more of a problem with whites because they are chilled before
serving. So, usually, it is recommended to cold stabilize white wines by
chilling them to 28F or so and letting them settle for 2 or 3 weeks at
that cold temperature. The tartrates precipitate, and at the end of cold
stabilization, you rack the wine off the precipitated tartrates.

This can be a problem in reds as well, though it is less likely. You can
prevent it in the future by cold stabilizing your red wine. You probably
don't need to cold stabilize to 28F, but I'd cool the carboy in a
refrigerator to at least 5 to 10 degrees (F) below you normal yearly low
temperature in your cellar. That's about 40F for my cellar (which dips
to 46-48F in the winter). Keep it at the lower temperature for 2 to 3
weeks, just like you would a white wine and rack it off the tartrate
crystals. Then you should have no problem with tartrate sediment in the
future. Note that doing this can reduce the acidity of the wine and
raise the pH slightly. If your wine is lacking in acidity or has a high
pH to begin with, you might just want to live with the sediment in the
bottles later.

Note that even if you cold stabilize your red wines, they still might
drop a sediment in the bottle from tannins. This is normal and can't
really be prevented. Even filtering won't stop this because the problem
is that the tannins polymerize and fall out of solution as the wine
ages.

Also, if the sediment you have now is tartrate sediment, it might
disolve when the temperature rises.


Quote:
> The wine was bulk aged for about 6 months. I have heard that red wines
will
> often throw a sediment in the bottle regardless of the length of bulk
aging.
> Is this true?

> Rob



> > My opinion?  If it is tartrates or tannins coming out, it won't hurt
a
> > thing.  If it is yeast and you have a lot of sediment, there is a
slight
> > chance this could cause some off flavors, but I wouldn't worry.
Sediment
> > does not normally harm red wine.  You didn't say how long you let it
bulk
> > age.  Next time, let it age in the carboy longer and you will get
less
> > sediment.  You can leave it in the carboy for a year or more.
Clearly, if
> > you had given it another 3 months, the sediment you see in your
bottles
> > would have been in the carboy.

> > Personally, I would not filter the wine.  Before serving, set your
bottle
> > upright for a few hours to let the sediment settle to the bottom,
and
> decant
> > it.  This is how red wines are traditionally dealt with.

> > ----Greg

> > On 1/17/01 9:48 PM, in article


> > > I have a batch of Cabernet Sauvignon (Spagnol's Cellar Classic)
that has
> > > been in the bottle for about 3 months. I noticed that there is a
> sediment
> > > deposit in the bottle.There was negligible sediment in the final
bulk
> aging
> > > stage just prior to bottling. I know this is common for red wines
but I
> am
> > > unsure if this is detrimental or not. Should I filter my future
batches?
> > > Some sources I have read indicate that red wine should be filtered
in
> order
> > > to prevent bottle sedimentation and other sources indicate that
> filtering
> > > should be avoided in red wines. Any thoughts?

> > > Rob

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Bottle Sediment

Post by Greg Coo » Sat, 20 Jan 2001 07:27:51


If they are tartrates, they may adhere to the glass.  The side method may
work.

----Greg


Quote:

> Would it not be better to leave the sediment at the bottom of the
> bottle to that the clearer wine pours out over top of it?  I guess it
> may depend on how dense the sediment is.

> -Chris



>>> I have a batch of Cabernet Sauvignon (Spagnol's Cellar Classic) that has
>>> been in the bottle for about 3 months. I noticed that there is a sediment
>>> deposit in the bottle

>> When you store bottles keep them on their sides, and don't rotate them.

>> If there is sediment it will form a line on the side of the bottle which is
>> at the bottom.
>> There will also be a slight haze of dust on the top of the bottle.

>> When you choose a bottle to serve: before you take if off the shelf draw a
>> line in the dust with your finger, it will be faint.  Then when you pour,
>> turn the bottle over so that the line in the dust is at the bottom, leaving
>> the line of sediment at the top.  This will enable you to gently pour the
>> wine off without dislodging the sediment.

>> Try it, it works!

>> Lisa

 
 
 

Bottle Sediment

Post by Casey's Mo » Sun, 21 Jan 2001 09:25:07


Yes,
I am referring to wine that has been racked at least 4 times before
bottling. And then aged for as long as 5 years.

Lisa

"> If they are tartrates, they may adhere to the glass.  The side method may

Quote:
> work.
> > Would it not be better to leave the sediment at the bottom of the
> > bottle to that the clearer wine pours out over top of it?  I guess it
> > may depend on how dense the sediment is.

 
 
 

Bottle Sediment

Post by Eddie Vanderzeeu » Mon, 22 Jan 2001 15:36:01


Lisa,
is using a old (very old) rule (trick) of serving aged wines. When you carefully
rotate the bottle (still horizontally) and the deposit sticks to the bottle
eureka, you can pour the whole bottle  and no sediment. You can turn the bottle
and the sediment clouds the bottle, put it back on the rack. Try the next one!
Eddie V.
Quote:

> Yes,
> I am referring to wine that has been racked at least 4 times before
> bottling. And then aged for as long as 5 years.

> Lisa

> "> If they are tartrates, they may adhere to the glass.  The side method may
> > work.

> > > Would it not be better to leave the sediment at the bottom of the
> > > bottle to that the clearer wine pours out over top of it?  I guess it
> > > may depend on how dense the sediment is.

 
 
 

Bottle Sediment

Post by Tom » Fri, 26 Jan 2001 13:26:54



Quote:
> I have a batch of Cabernet Sauvignon (Spagnol's Cellar Classic) that has
> been in the bottle for about 3 months. I noticed that there is a sediment
> deposit in the bottle.There was negligible sediment in the final bulk
aging
> stage just prior to bottling. I know this is common for red wines but I am
> unsure if this is detrimental or not. Should I filter my future batches?
> Some sources I have read indicate that red wine should be filtered in
order
> to prevent bottle sedimentation and other sources indicate that filtering
> should be avoided in red wines. Any thoughts?

Sounds like you didn't bulk age your wine long enough.  One more racking and
another 6 months in the carboy would have helped.

Tom S