renting a wine filter in the New York metropolitan area

renting a wine filter in the New York metropolitan area

Post by G Feig » Tue, 26 Nov 2002 11:31:47



Any suggestions on where I can rent a wine filter to filter a small (23 liter)
batch of red wine in the New York metropolitan area?

In the event that I'm not able to rent a wine filter, does anyone
have comments about inexpensive filters that I can purchase?  For example,
how is the Vinbrite Mark III kit, which is a gravity fed filter?
Thanks.

 
 
 

renting a wine filter in the New York metropolitan area

Post by Jonathan Sach » Tue, 26 Nov 2002 14:32:29


The only type of place that I can imagine renting a wine filter would
be a winemaking supply store, so winemaking supply stores are the
places to ask. If they don't do this, one of them may well know a
helpful individual who would be willing to do it.

Send email to jsachs177 at earthlink dot net.

 
 
 

renting a wine filter in the New York metropolitan area

Post by LG11 » Wed, 27 Nov 2002 02:07:27


Are there any homebrew shops in Manhattan?  I often visit NYC, and I've never
found one.

Lee

 
 
 

renting a wine filter in the New York metropolitan area

Post by Ray » Wed, 27 Nov 2002 04:52:36


I think most people here would not recommend filtering a red.  Do you have a
significant problem here?

Ray


Quote:
> Any suggestions on where I can rent a wine filter to filter a small (23
liter)
> batch of red wine in the New York metropolitan area?

> In the event that I'm not able to rent a wine filter, does anyone
> have comments about inexpensive filters that I can purchase?  For example,
> how is the Vinbrite Mark III kit, which is a gravity fed filter?
> Thanks.

 
 
 

renting a wine filter in the New York metropolitan area

Post by Mike MT » Wed, 27 Nov 2002 08:27:27


Lee,
There used to be a place called Milan Labs down on Spring St. in Little
Italy. I hate to admit that it's been nearly 20 years since I've been
there though.

Mike MTM

 
 
 

renting a wine filter in the New York metropolitan area

Post by G Feig » Wed, 27 Nov 2002 23:32:08


Quote:

> I think most people here would not recommend filtering a red.  Do you have a
> significant problem here?

> Ray

Well, I'm new to this but the wine kit I'm using (from Wine Kitz) says in
its instructions (about making red wine):  "We recommend filtering
the wine to give it a professional appearance."  They further say:
"Filtering helps to remove fragments of fruit, fining agents and
yeast cells that could eventually fall out of suspension and form
sediment in the bottles.  Filtering helps to improve
taste, appearance and durability.  Most wines will gain an added 'sparkle'
after filtering."  

Now, being naturally lazy, I have no desire to do more work than necessary
to get a decent wine.  So, I'm more than happy not to bother filtering
the wine, if the opinion of experienced people is that this is
unnecessary and possibly deleterious.

 
 
 

renting a wine filter in the New York metropolitan area

Post by Ray » Thu, 28 Nov 2002 02:22:36


I think they are trying to rush you.  Give it a little extra time and it
will clear on its own with no risk of ill effects caused by a filter
stripping color or flavor.  The one thing every wine maker MUST learn is
patience.  It is hard early on but it becomes easier in direct proportion to
the size of your wine storage.  Shine a light through it.  If it is clear,
and has some sediment on the bottom, rack it one more time.  At this racking
I would say it is important to rack directly into another carboy, not into a
bucket and then into a carboy.  Go to 1 gal jugs if you need to.  If you
want some samples quicker, rack some off the top into bottles at this point.
Then after a few weeks, if there is hardly any sediment you can bottle or
you can let it age longer in bulk.  It is your choice.

In 30+ years of winemaking I have never filtered a wine and I have never
bottled a cloudy wine.

Ray

Quote:

> Well, I'm new to this but the wine kit I'm using (from Wine Kitz) says in
> its instructions (about making red wine):  "We recommend filtering
> the wine to give it a professional appearance."  They further say:
> "Filtering helps to remove fragments of fruit, fining agents and
> yeast cells that could eventually fall out of suspension and form
> sediment in the bottles.  Filtering helps to improve
> taste, appearance and durability.  Most wines will gain an added 'sparkle'
> after filtering."

> Now, being naturally lazy, I have no desire to do more work than necessary
> to get a decent wine.  So, I'm more than happy not to bother filtering
> the wine, if the opinion of experienced people is that this is
> unnecessary and possibly deleterious.

 
 
 

renting a wine filter in the New York metropolitan area

Post by Mike » Thu, 28 Nov 2002 11:37:20


You can make your own filtering equipment if you know simple DIY. Northern
tool has a water pump that will do 1gpm
at  30psi for around $50US. Go to the local DIY center and pick up a filter
kit for refrigerator ice makers. The filter
will more than likely be a 5 micron with carbon. DO NOT USE THIS FILTER!
Pick up replacement filters (about 2 for
$5US). Get the sediment or 1 micron WITHOUT carbon/charcoal. Pick up some
clear tubing and worm (or hose)
clamps.

direction of flow --------->

---------hose to carboy 6 feet---------pump------filter---------hose to
carboy 6 feet-------------

run campdon tablet water thru to sterilize (input and output can be in the
same bucket)
remove  the filter and it makes a handy racking tool

Mike


Quote:
> I think they are trying to rush you.  Give it a little extra time and it
> will clear on its own with no risk of ill effects caused by a filter
> stripping color or flavor.  The one thing every wine maker MUST learn is
> patience.  It is hard early on but it becomes easier in direct proportion
to
> the size of your wine storage.  Shine a light through it.  If it is clear,
> and has some sediment on the bottom, rack it one more time.  At this
racking
> I would say it is important to rack directly into another carboy, not into
a
> bucket and then into a carboy.  Go to 1 gal jugs if you need to.  If you
> want some samples quicker, rack some off the top into bottles at this
point.
> Then after a few weeks, if there is hardly any sediment you can bottle or
> you can let it age longer in bulk.  It is your choice.

> In 30+ years of winemaking I have never filtered a wine and I have never
> bottled a cloudy wine.

> Ray

> > Well, I'm new to this but the wine kit I'm using (from Wine Kitz) says
in
> > its instructions (about making red wine):  "We recommend filtering
> > the wine to give it a professional appearance."  They further say:
> > "Filtering helps to remove fragments of fruit, fining agents and
> > yeast cells that could eventually fall out of suspension and form
> > sediment in the bottles.  Filtering helps to improve
> > taste, appearance and durability.  Most wines will gain an added
'sparkle'
> > after filtering."

> > Now, being naturally lazy, I have no desire to do more work than
necessary
> > to get a decent wine.  So, I'm more than happy not to bother filtering
> > the wine, if the opinion of experienced people is that this is
> > unnecessary and possibly deleterious.

 
 
 

renting a wine filter in the New York metropolitan area

Post by Russel » Tue, 03 Dec 2002 15:45:56


Check out Corrado's 800 Getty Ave,Clifton,NJ
888-778-WINE

Russ

Quote:
> I think most people here would not recommend filtering a red.  Do you have
a
> significant problem here?

> Ray



> > Any suggestions on where I can rent a wine filter to filter a small (23
> liter)
> > batch of red wine in the New York metropolitan area?

> > In the event that I'm not able to rent a wine filter, does anyone
> > have comments about inexpensive filters that I can purchase?  For
example,
> > how is the Vinbrite Mark III kit, which is a gravity fed filter?
> > Thanks.