New house With a Pear Tree :)

New house With a Pear Tree :)

Post by <St.. » Sat, 14 Jun 2003 13:08:34



I bought the house this past winter and just discovered this spring I have a pear tree. Obviously, pear wine is on my mind. As I understand it, bartlett pears don't ripen on the tree. I also understand that they have to be picked when they're kind of hard for optimal ripening and eating. But what about winemaking? If I wait until they fall off the tree, is that a good time to use them, or is there a best time to pick?

I've never had a pear tree before and never made a pear wine, so any info. would really help!

 
 
 

New house With a Pear Tree :)

Post by ninevi.. » Sat, 14 Jun 2003 22:18:23


Quote:
> I've never had a pear tree before and never made a pear wine, so any
> info. would really help!

Lucky you. I have made Bartlett pear wine twice. Some random
thoughts... First, wait until the fruit is really ripe - perhaps just
short of overripe - to maximize sweetness and juiciness. Do not puree
the fruit, or you will have a heck of a time getting the juice to
separate. Instead, pull the stems, cut them in quarters, and remove
the seeds. Freeze the cut pears in airtight bags for a few days. Thaw
them while leaving in the bags, then put the fruit (which will be
juicy and turning soft) into nylon strainer bags or even pantyhose in
a pinch, and toss them into your primary. Add your Campden tablets at
that time, as pear juice can oxidize fairly easily. Put some pectic
enzyme in there too.

You can utilize cool water in the primary, rather than hot. Squeeze
the pulp to get the juice out. It will continue to seep out over the
next couple of days, which is when I would pull the bag (after
allowing it to drip freely to get all the juice). I wouldn't bother
with tannin, as pear skin has some. But I'm of the "retain the fruit's
personality" school - I don't try to make other fruits into grapes.
You will have to add acid to a TA of about .65%. This will allow an
off-dry to slightly sweet finish. Add more acid for a sweet wine,
possibly a tad less for totally dry.

I had no trouble getting my pear wines to clear, although they do
produce some fluffy lees. I finished the first one slightly sweet, and
it was great. The next was done dry. It is good, but I prefer just
off-dry as it brings out the fruit a bit better. Bottle it in
yellow-green Burgundy bottles (like Chard).

Roger
Quinta do Placer

 
 
 

New house With a Pear Tree :)

Post by Michae » Sun, 15 Jun 2003 00:45:05



Quote:
>I bought the house this past winter and just discovered this spring I have

a pear tree. Obviously, pear wine is on my mind. As I understand it,
bartlett pears don't >ripen on the tree. I also understand that they have to
be picked when they're kind of hard for optimal ripening and eating. But
what about winemaking? If I wait >until they fall off the tree, is that a
good time to use them, or is there a best time to pick?

Quote:
>I've never had a pear tree before and never made a pear wine, so any info.

would really help!

Not exactly an answer to your question but we do a few of these each season.
If the pears haven't gotten too big go out and trim a branch with a single
pear on the end.  Now slip that pear down in a clean bottle and duct tape it
shut.  Do this so the bottle doesn't get full sun all day but just a little.
Support the bottle well because the pear will grow larger.  If you want five
bottles, bottle up ten.  A few always go bad.

You can make your own pear brandy if you so desire but I fake mine.  Four or
five ripe pears soaked in vodka and pear schnaps for a month or so.  Pour
vodka in the bottles with the pears to preserve them while the other
matures.  Make nice gifts at Christmas time.

 
 
 

New house With a Pear Tree :)

Post by <St.. » Sun, 15 Jun 2003 12:46:48



Quote:



> >I bought the house this past winter and just discovered this spring I
have
> a pear tree. Obviously, pear wine is on my mind. As I understand it,
> bartlett pears don't >ripen on the tree. I also understand that they have
to
> be picked when they're kind of hard for optimal ripening and eating. But
> what about winemaking? If I wait >until they fall off the tree, is that a
> good time to use them, or is there a best time to pick?

> >I've never had a pear tree before and never made a pear wine, so any
info.
> would really help!

> Not exactly an answer to your question but we do a few of these each
season.
> If the pears haven't gotten too big go out and trim a branch with a single
> pear on the end.  Now slip that pear down in a clean bottle and duct tape
it
> shut.  Do this so the bottle doesn't get full sun all day but just a
little.
> Support the bottle well because the pear will grow larger.  If you want
five
> bottles, bottle up ten.  A few always go bad.

> You can make your own pear brandy if you so desire but I fake mine.  Four
or
> five ripe pears soaked in vodka and pear schnaps for a month or so.  Pour
> vodka in the bottles with the pears to preserve them while the other
> matures.  Make nice gifts at Christmas time.

Sounds like a great idea, I've got to try it. Thanks!
 
 
 

New house With a Pear Tree :)

Post by <St.. » Sun, 15 Jun 2003 12:46:49



Quote:
> > I've never had a pear tree before and never made a pear wine, so any
> > info. would really help!

> Lucky you. I have made Bartlett pear wine twice. Some random
> thoughts... First, wait until the fruit is really ripe - perhaps just
> short of overripe - to maximize sweetness and juiciness. Do not puree
> the fruit, or you will have a heck of a time getting the juice to
> separate. Instead, pull the stems, cut them in quarters, and remove
> the seeds. Freeze the cut pears in airtight bags for a few days. Thaw
> them while leaving in the bags, then put the fruit (which will be
> juicy and turning soft) into nylon strainer bags or even pantyhose in
> a pinch, and toss them into your primary. Add your Campden tablets at
> that time, as pear juice can oxidize fairly easily. Put some pectic
> enzyme in there too.

> You can utilize cool water in the primary, rather than hot. Squeeze
> the pulp to get the juice out. It will continue to seep out over the
> next couple of days, which is when I would pull the bag (after
> allowing it to drip freely to get all the juice). I wouldn't bother
> with tannin, as pear skin has some. But I'm of the "retain the fruit's
> personality" school - I don't try to make other fruits into grapes.
> You will have to add acid to a TA of about .65%. This will allow an
> off-dry to slightly sweet finish. Add more acid for a sweet wine,
> possibly a tad less for totally dry.

> I had no trouble getting my pear wines to clear, although they do
> produce some fluffy lees. I finished the first one slightly sweet, and
> it was great. The next was done dry. It is good, but I prefer just
> off-dry as it brings out the fruit a bit better. Bottle it in
> yellow-green Burgundy bottles (like Chard).

> Roger
> Quinta do Placer

Thanks for all the useful info.! Hopefully I can get it right the first
time.
 
 
 

New house With a Pear Tree :)

Post by Jack Kell » Mon, 16 Jun 2003 04:53:42


Go to http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/request.asp and search the list
under the featured recipe for "pear."  There are several recipes, but
take a look at the "Cooking Pear Wine."  We just racked a batch....

Jack Keller, The Winemaking Home Page
http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/

 
 
 

New house With a Pear Tree :)

Post by sgbr » Mon, 16 Jun 2003 13:53:25


Don't start with to high of a SG, try to finish for a rather dry wine,
and then add if you want to go sweeter.

I usually added some of my lemon wine, which I make purely for the
purpose of blending in for acidity. Gives the pear wine a
tarter/crisper flavor.

The pears ripen on the trees seem to have a few degrees more sugar
than fruit ripen of the trees.  I have not done any exact comparison
between the two, but if I had the chance I would like to try this.
Having no pear trees anymore I today can't. Maybe you could do a batch
and report your findings? If it is a large tree you should have plenty
on opportunity to do various batches. Have fun.

SG Brix

 
 
 

New house With a Pear Tree :)

Post by Woodsw » Wed, 18 Jun 2003 09:43:25


Quote:

>This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

>------=_NextPart_000_0066_01C3313F.FD09E290
>Content-Type: text/plain;
>        charset="iso-8859-1"
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

>I bought the house this past winter and just discovered this spring I =
>have a pear tree. Obviously, pear wine is on my mind. As I understand =
>it, bartlett pears don't ripen on the tree. I also understand that they =
>have to be picked when they're kind of hard for optimal ripening and =
>eating. But what about winemaking? If I wait until they fall off the =
>tree, is that a good time to use them, or is there a best time to pick?

You'll want to pick just before they're ripe, then let them ripen before using
for wine.  Bartletts ripen after dropping, and you don't want to use any
damaged fruit in preserves, jams, or wine. (An additional benefit is not
having to fight the wasps and yellow jackets for the drops ;-)

Woods

 
 
 

New house With a Pear Tree :)

Post by <St.. » Wed, 18 Jun 2003 12:24:11



Quote:


> >This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

> >------=_NextPart_000_0066_01C3313F.FD09E290
> >Content-Type: text/plain;
> >        charset="iso-8859-1"
> >Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

> >I bought the house this past winter and just discovered this spring I =
> >have a pear tree. Obviously, pear wine is on my mind. As I understand =
> >it, bartlett pears don't ripen on the tree. I also understand that they =
> >have to be picked when they're kind of hard for optimal ripening and =
> >eating. But what about winemaking? If I wait until they fall off the =
> >tree, is that a good time to use them, or is there a best time to pick?

> You'll want to pick just before they're ripe, then let them ripen before
using
> for wine.  Bartletts ripen after dropping, and you don't want to use any
> damaged fruit in preserves, jams, or wine. (An additional benefit is not
> having to fight the wasps and yellow jackets for the drops ;-)

> Woods

Since I never had a pear tree I don't know how to tell when they're about to
drop. Do I pick when the first ones drop? I saw a pear tree on my walk last
year that dropped a few before shedding everything. But watching mine now,
even the tiny pears fall off in limited quantities. How do I know it's time
to pick?
 
 
 

New house With a Pear Tree :)

Post by Woodsw » Thu, 19 Jun 2003 07:32:34


Quote:





>> >This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

>> >------=_NextPart_000_0066_01C3313F.FD09E290
>> >Content-Type: text/plain;
>> >        charset="iso-8859-1"
>> >Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

>> >I bought the house this past winter and just discovered this spring I =
>> >have a pear tree. Obviously, pear wine is on my mind. As I understand =
>> >it, bartlett pears don't ripen on the tree. I also understand that they =
>> >have to be picked when they're kind of hard for optimal ripening and =
>> >eating. But what about winemaking? If I wait until they fall off the =
>> >tree, is that a good time to use them, or is there a best time to pick?

>> You'll want to pick just before they're ripe, then let them ripen before
>using
>> for wine.  Bartletts ripen after dropping, and you don't want to use any
>> damaged fruit in preserves, jams, or wine. (An additional benefit is not
>> having to fight the wasps and yellow jackets for the drops ;-)

>> Woods

>Since I never had a pear tree I don't know how to tell when they're about to
>drop. Do I pick when the first ones drop? I saw a pear tree on my walk last
>year that dropped a few before shedding everything. But watching mine now,
>even the tiny pears fall off in limited quantities. How do I know it's time
>to pick?

When you have a couple of drops that are ripe on the ground, get the ones
still on the tree off.  (Basically, they look like the bartletts you see in
the stores - green.  They turn a pale yellow when fully ripe)

Woods

- Show quoted text -

 
 
 

New house With a Pear Tree :)

Post by Pavel31 » Thu, 19 Jun 2003 09:52:01


I keep about three pounds of pear segments in the freezer after I make the
wine. When the wine has fermented to dryness and aged about nine months, I
thaw the remaining pears and let the nectar/syrup drip through a fine jelly
bag. I put this in a one-gallon jug, top off with dry pear wine, and add
sorbate and metasulfite. I bottle the remaining batch of dry pear.

After a month under airlock, I bottle the gallon of cream pear. It's
excellent; the slight sweetness adds a creamy texture much like cream
sherry.

Paul

 
 
 

New house With a Pear Tree :)

Post by <St.. » Thu, 19 Jun 2003 14:46:51



Quote:







Quote:

> >> >This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

> >> >------=_NextPart_000_0066_01C3313F.FD09E290
> >> >Content-Type: text/plain;
> >> >        charset="iso-8859-1"
> >> >Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

> >> >I bought the house this past winter and just discovered this spring I
=
> >> >have a pear tree. Obviously, pear wine is on my mind. As I understand
=
> >> >it, bartlett pears don't ripen on the tree. I also understand that
they =
> >> >have to be picked when they're kind of hard for optimal ripening and =
> >> >eating. But what about winemaking? If I wait until they fall off the =
> >> >tree, is that a good time to use them, or is there a best time to
pick?

> >> You'll want to pick just before they're ripe, then let them ripen
before
> >using
> >> for wine.  Bartletts ripen after dropping, and you don't want to use
any
> >> damaged fruit in preserves, jams, or wine. (An additional benefit is
not
> >> having to fight the wasps and yellow jackets for the drops ;-)

> >> Woods

> >Since I never had a pear tree I don't know how to tell when they're about
to
> >drop. Do I pick when the first ones drop? I saw a pear tree on my walk
last
> >year that dropped a few before shedding everything. But watching mine
now,
> >even the tiny pears fall off in limited quantities. How do I know it's
time
> >to pick?

> When you have a couple of drops that are ripe on the ground, get the ones
> still on the tree off.  (Basically, they look like the bartletts you see
in
> the stores - green.  They turn a pale yellow when fully ripe)

> Woods

Thanks! More questions: How do you get the others off? I have a very long
(18') pruning tool with a clipper and a saw. Should I knock them to the
ground, or devise some method to catch them? can I tap them or do I need to
cut them? If I snip the branch by the bloom will it hurt the tree? Should I
make some kind of fruit picker attachment or buy one?
 
 
 

New house With a Pear Tree :)

Post by Pavel31 » Thu, 19 Jun 2003 20:23:57


Quote:
> Thanks! More questions: How do you get the others off? I have a very long
> (18') pruning tool with a clipper and a saw. Should I knock them to the
> ground, or devise some method to catch them? can I tap them or do I need
to
> cut them? If I snip the branch by the bloom will it hurt the tree? Should
I
> make some kind of fruit picker attachment or buy one?

Find a tin can which is big enough to hold a pear. Fasten it to the end of a
long pole. Reach up and get the pear into the can, then twist and push and
turn the pole until the pear falls off into the can.

Paul

 
 
 

New house With a Pear Tree :)

Post by Shado » Fri, 20 Jun 2003 04:04:56


I have found that the simple pecan-picking
implements like we have down here work
as well.
For those who do not already know, I live
in south Louisiana (not far from the Gulf
Coast) and naturally we have almost every
pecan-related device known to man as a
staple down here.
Pecan pickers are just long poles with a cap
at the end that has a honeycomb shaped basket
of wires parallel to the pole attached at the end.
The "cooking pears" (I don't know the actual name
of them, but that's what we call them here --
the ***es that are gritty, but make a *censored*
great preserve.)
We've used the pecan pickers, but you have to bend,
GENTLY mind you, the loops so they are spaced about
2 or 3 inches apart if you intend to pick pears.
The wires are soft, to allow parting for the pecans to
enter, then be caught when you twist and pull, hence
the opening of the wires for a larger fruit.
I'm certain others here probably have better, or at
least more efficient means, but that's how we Cajuns
do it.
;o)