I feel like an IDIOT. My ill fated wine...

I feel like an IDIOT. My ill fated wine...

Post by (s.. » Mon, 28 Sep 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
>There are carboy handles that go around the neck.  I used to use them
>but snapped the neck off of a carboy once when I relied on it too much.

There are brew bottle bags that fit around your carboy.  Apparently it's a
new product but anyone good with a sewing machine and the strong nylon fabric
can make bags large and strong enough to support the carboys.

----------

Winemaking linx & FTP, rec.crafts.winemaking FAQ, 1st Baptist Scout Troop
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I feel like an IDIOT. My ill fated wine...

Post by Darren S A Georg » Mon, 28 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
> Does glass really have
> benifits that plastic does not, or does plastic have disadvantages?

One advantage that glass has over plastics (that has not been gone over
already) is that glass is not flexible.  So, when you're moving your
carboy (either by pushing it or picking it up and setting it down)
you're not causing the carboy to suck all the liquid out of your
airlock.  Also, you don't get wine jumping out of the carboy if you
remove the airlock prior to movement.

--
The Mad Alchemist
http://members.xoom.com/madalch
One does not quote Gandhi to a rabid grizzly.
There are no ungulates in my email.

 
 
 

I feel like an IDIOT. My ill fated wine...

Post by Barry G » Tue, 29 Sep 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
>>There are carboy handles that go around the neck.  I used to use them
>>but snapped the neck off of a carboy once when I relied on it too much.
>There are brew bottle bags that fit around your carboy.  Apparently it's a
>new product but anyone good with a sewing machine and the strong nylon fabric
>can make bags large and strong enough to support the carboys.
>----------

>Winemaking linx & FTP, rec.crafts.winemaking FAQ, 1st Baptist Scout Troop
>(Mtl Que Can), firestarter FAQ, Scouting FTP & Ask-A-Scout(er), Star Trek
>linx & FTP, Help Stop Spam, Zee Svedish Cheff, Summer Camp selection

I have purchased 30 or more carboys and all came in a plastic basket with
handles and lid with a hole though which the neck passes. I believe these
units are made in Italy. Moving 10litre or 54litre can be done without
fear of breakage.
 
 
 

I feel like an IDIOT. My ill fated wine...

Post by Paul Jean Jr » Tue, 29 Sep 1998 04:00:00


I can understand your incredulity. Yes, my full carboys are usually waist high or
higher and I rackusing gravity in a two step operation. primary 6 gallon plastic
pail is set on a counter and raised on blocks to about chest high. One has a tap 2
inches up from the bottom, while the others do not. Filling the pail is done in
small quatities so as not to spill if I had to lift the whole pail up to the
desired hight.

First racking from pail to secondary, carboy (glass or plastic) is set on a table
about a foot below counter level. Racking is done by gravity again. Wine sits here
no more than a month.

Final racking to glass carboy set onto a styrofoam pad (mine is white) laying on
the cement floor. Wine can sit here up to 6 months.

Thus, when I am ready to rack into bottles I usually only have to lift this carboy
once and it is only to the mid level (about two feet up).

I don't find this too hard to do, and it saves my back.

Your advice is good also. I do not use handles and if one washes out the carboy
immediately after use, there is no serious gunk to scrub or treat. Hot water is
definitely a nono with glass.

Paul

Quote:


> > Finally, NEVER CARRY FULL GLASS CARBOYS appart from what happened to you
> > I've seen the bottom fall out of a couple.

> > Paul Jean Jr.
> > Publisher, Getting Started in Winemaking by JE Underhill

> WHAT!? What do you do, use a pump for all your wine transfers so that your
> carboy never has to leave the safety of the floor? Sorry, I don't agree with
> that advice at all. I'm not saying pick up your 5 gallons of wine and do a
> little jig down the street, but let's not be paranoid either. The problem you
> cite is a rare occurence and almost certainly resulted from mistreatment of
> the carboy. My advice is to care for your carboy properly by following a few
> simple rules.

> Never buy a used carboy. You have no idea what the previous owner did to it.

> Never wash with hot water. Thermal shock will weaken the glass and eventually
> it will fail. I have found that filling the carboy with warm water and some
> dishwasher detergent removes even the worst gunk (beer krausen) without any
> scrubbing. Rinse several times with warm water and let dry or store with
> sulfite solution.

> Do not knock it against any hard object, such as another carboy or the
> concrete floor. 1" insulation sheets (that blue stuff) make a great base to
> sit carboys on. Wrap some bubble wrap around the glass as a shock absorber if
> need be.

> Don't use carboy handles. Make sure the glass and your hands are completely
> dry, wrap one hand firmly around the neck and place your other hand under the
> base and lift with your legs (that's more for the health of your back than the
> carboy). Make sure the floor is not slippery or cluttered with objects and
> walk in a purposeful but unhurried manner to your destination. Place it down
> gently.

> Never pass a full carboy to another person. I can't imagine why you would want
> to do this, but just don't.

> None of this will matter if you are simply unlucky enough to acquire a carboy
> with a manufacturing defect but frankly, you can't go through life worrying
> about lightning strikes or meteor collisions.

> Brian

 
 
 

I feel like an IDIOT. My ill fated wine...

Post by Mike » Wed, 30 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> So....I was thinking of ditching glass and going with the plastics.
> Am I being too overreactive about this?  Does glass really have
> benifits that plastic does not, or does plastic have disadvantages?

> Thanks.  -Tom

Tom -

I use plastic for my primary and glass after that.  Never had a problem
with the plastic as primary.

Mike