Wild yeast vs. cultured yeast

Wild yeast vs. cultured yeast

Post by Jean Laliber » Fri, 07 Jul 1995 04:00:00



I have been making wine from fresh grapes each sept. for the
last few years. Ihave always relied on naturally present yeasts
for formentation process. I have always had good results with
this method. My normal volume of grapes is 25 cases of 36lbs. ea.
This year i am seriously considering sterilising the must with
campden tablets and pitching a commercial yeast strain.
This year i will probably be using a cabernet sauvignon (85%)
and ruby cab (15%) blend of grapes.
   I would like to know if there is a great advantage by using
a commercial yeast strains and if so, can anyone recommend
a suitable yeast ?
Any information is greatly appreciated
Regards        Jean Laliberte

 
 
 

Wild yeast vs. cultured yeast

Post by Jydub » Fri, 07 Jul 1995 04:00:00


I live in Minnesota and would like to know where to fine grapes for wine?

 
 
 

Wild yeast vs. cultured yeast

Post by Scott Arig » Sun, 09 Jul 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

>This year i will probably be using a cabernet sauvignon (85%)
>and ruby cab (15%) blend of grapes.
>   I would like to know if there is a great advantage by using
>a commercial yeast strains and if so, can anyone recommend
>a suitable yeast ?
>Any information is greatly appreciated
>Regards        Jean Laliberte

Jean,
The main reason for using a commercial yeast strain is to get a
_known_ strain that is likely to give good results.  Wild strains may
or may not give acceptable results.  If you have to _buy_ your grapes
the commercial strains lower your financial risk.  For the Cab blend,
Red Star Pasteur Champagne yeast is a good choice and widely
available.  Many others will work perfectly well.  
Best,
Scott Arighi
 
 
 

Wild yeast vs. cultured yeast

Post by rrlu.. » Sun, 09 Jul 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

>  I have been making wine from fresh grapes each sept. for the
>  last few years. Ihave always relied on naturally present yeasts
>  for formentation process. I have always had good results with
>  this method. My normal volume of grapes is 25 cases of 36lbs. ea.
>  This year i am seriously considering sterilising the must with
>  campden tablets and pitching a commercial yeast strain.
>  This year i will probably be using a cabernet sauvignon (85%)
>  and ruby cab (15%) blend of grapes.
>     I would like to know if there is a great advantage by using
>  a commercial yeast strains and if so, can anyone recommend
>  a suitable yeast ?

Good commercial yeasts (I would recommend Red Star or Lalvin) offer a safe,consistent  
fermentation. Wild yeasts can be unpredictable, although if you always get grapes from the
same area, and have had good success, it is likely that a stable, beneficial yeast population
exists in the area.  Different yeasts provide subtle variations in flavor and aroma. Some have
special characteristics, such as using Lalvin 71B for malic acid reduction. For Cabernets and
Merlots, the Wine Lab suggests Red Star Pasteur Red. Montrachet would also be an
acceptable choice, but I would add nutrients to lessen the chance of hydrogen sulfide.

Why not split up your batch this year and experiment? Do some au naturel, some with
commercial yeasts.  There may be noticeable differences early on, or they may not appear for
several years.

Brian

 
 
 

Wild yeast vs. cultured yeast

Post by Dave Kehl » Tue, 11 Jul 1995 04:00:00


A recent Practical Winery and Vineyard had an article about wild yeast
fermentations.  It turns out that a different species of yeast than the
usual Saccharomyces (sp?) starts out the fermentation and takes it to
about 5% ***.  Then the Saccharomyces takes over and finishes the
fermentation.  With an inoculated fermentation, it goes completely from
start to finish with Saccharomyces.  The article noted that drawing
lees from a tank already going with a wild yeast fermentation to start
a new tank won't give the expected result.  The first tank may be past
the initial phase.

So there may be something to the claim that the wild yeast fermentation
provides character that the inoculated fermentations don't.

Dave