Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Shaun Rimme » Fri, 29 Aug 2003 17:43:46



Hi again sagely folks of the wonderful world of wines.

My wife and I picked 44lbs of (I believe) Victoria plums last night from a
friends garden - coulda picked twice that easily, but we only had about an
hour and no use for 88lbs of plums...but I digress. These are very ripe and
sweet indeed (but not rotten in the least!), and needed processing straight
away (skins would 'slide off' with little effort - they would of all browned
from the handling of picking them if left).

36lb of them we squished the (2 and a bit lbs of) stones out of, and mashed
(smooshed 'em good with our clean hands - didn't have the time left to pulp
'em smoothly) into a primary ferm bucket. This gave us 3.5 UK gal of pulp. I
added 4 dissolved camden tablets and 4 tsp pectolase, sealed the lid on and
left 'em.

Now, there's no way we are going to get all the juice/sugar out of them in
this state (is there?), as they are only 'smooshed', and we don't own/have
access a press - any tips? Should I stick the bucket in the chest freezer
for a while? Run them through a blender (bit-by-bit - it ain't even nearly a
36 UK gal blender, unfortunately.....heheheh....)?

Also, Will it be OK to ferment this pulp without diluting (we're going to
add some blackberries and maybe elderberries to, maybe enough to make the
pulp up to about 4-5 or so UK gal)? Or should we be looking at making 10 UK
gal from this by adding sugar and water to the correct volume and gravity?

The thing I'm worried about is, even if we get a good gravity from this
(undiluted) juice without adding any/much sugar, is that it will be too
acidic (the fruit is sweet, but the skins are rather acid, and tannic) to
ferment as-is. Have no way of testing this at the moment. Also, if we can't
separate the juice from the pulp well, we aren't going to get anywhere near
accurate gravity readings (OK, I gave in this time and agreed to do the
hydrometer thing, for the first time......).

We are after a wine of about 15 - 17 % ABV, and bone dry. Haven't a clue yet
what OG I'm looking for to achieve this, either.

TIA for any help, advice, flippant and/or sarcastic comments, insults to my
ancestors etc. (It's all good).

Cheers!

Shaun aRe

A smile shared with another is 2 smiles.

',;~}~

 
 
 

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Greg Coo » Fri, 29 Aug 2003 21:24:51




Quote:
> Hi again sagely folks of the wonderful world of wines.

> My wife and I picked 44lbs of (I believe) Victoria plums last night from a
> friends garden - coulda picked twice that easily, but we only had about an
> hour and no use for 88lbs of plums...but I digress. These are very ripe and
> sweet indeed (but not rotten in the least!), and needed processing straight
> away (skins would 'slide off' with little effort - they would of all browned
> from the handling of picking them if left).

> 36lb of them we squished the (2 and a bit lbs of) stones out of, and mashed
> (smooshed 'em good with our clean hands - didn't have the time left to pulp
> 'em smoothly) into a primary ferm bucket. This gave us 3.5 UK gal of pulp. I
> added 4 dissolved camden tablets and 4 tsp pectolase, sealed the lid on and
> left 'em.

> Now, there's no way we are going to get all the juice/sugar out of them in
> this state (is there?), as they are only 'smooshed', and we don't own/have
> access a press - any tips? Should I stick the bucket in the chest freezer
> for a while? Run them through a blender (bit-by-bit - it ain't even nearly a
> 36 UK gal blender, unfortunately.....heheheh....)?

> Also, Will it be OK to ferment this pulp without diluting (we're going to
> add some blackberries and maybe elderberries to, maybe enough to make the
> pulp up to about 4-5 or so UK gal)? Or should we be looking at making 10 UK
> gal from this by adding sugar and water to the correct volume and gravity?

> The thing I'm worried about is, even if we get a good gravity from this
> (undiluted) juice without adding any/much sugar, is that it will be too
> acidic (the fruit is sweet, but the skins are rather acid, and tannic) to
> ferment as-is. Have no way of testing this at the moment. Also, if we can't
> separate the juice from the pulp well, we aren't going to get anywhere near
> accurate gravity readings (OK, I gave in this time and agreed to do the
> hydrometer thing, for the first time......).

> We are after a wine of about 15 - 17 % ABV, and bone dry. Haven't a clue yet
> what OG I'm looking for to achieve this, either.

> TIA for any help, advice, flippant and/or sarcastic comments, insults to my
> ancestors etc. (It's all good).

> Cheers!

> Shaun aRe

> A smile shared with another is 2 smiles.

> ',;~}~

Well, I think it all depends on what style of wine you are after. If you
want a sweeter heavier port style wine, ferment without dilution. If you
are looking for a dry table wine, I would dilute it by about half, bring
the gravity up to about 1.090 and add some acid blend.

In order to get clear juice to measure the gravity, you could strain
some of the pulp and filter it through a coffee filter.

Now, you have two options . .. you can add water to your pulp and
ferment on that. Since it is already breaking down with your pectin
enzyme, you could try to press out the juice (add water first, or not
add water) using a straining bag or sack cloth. Perhaps first straining
through a coated wire mesh basket and then through a cloth or straining
bag. This way you can then do a juice fermentation without the pulp.

It will not hurt anything if you want to freeze it for later.

---Greg
http://homepage.mac.com/gregcook/Wine
http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/instruct/grcook/wine

 
 
 

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Dar » Fri, 29 Aug 2003 21:39:00


Hello,
I've been wanting to do a plum wine, so when the plums went on sale I
downloaded a recipe from Jack's site and then bought the recommended number
of pounds.  I took the pits out, cut them up, added a little sugar and threw
them in the fridge for about 30 minutes to let the sugar mix well with the
fruit and them threw them in the freezer.  I will probably wait a couple of
months before I make the wine.  In the meantime, freezing will help break
down the fruit.  Here's Jack's site; he's got tons of recipes and tips on
making wine at home.   http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/index.asp
Good luck
Darlene


Quote:
> Hi again sagely folks of the wonderful world of wines.

> My wife and I picked 44lbs of (I believe) Victoria plums last night from a
> friends garden - coulda picked twice that easily, but we only had about an
> hour and no use for 88lbs of plums...but I digress. These are very ripe
and
> sweet indeed (but not rotten in the least!), and needed processing
straight
> away (skins would 'slide off' with little effort - they would of all
browned
> from the handling of picking them if left).

> 36lb of them we squished the (2 and a bit lbs of) stones out of, and
mashed
> (smooshed 'em good with our clean hands - didn't have the time left to
pulp
> 'em smoothly) into a primary ferm bucket. This gave us 3.5 UK gal of pulp.
I
> added 4 dissolved camden tablets and 4 tsp pectolase, sealed the lid on
and
> left 'em.

> Now, there's no way we are going to get all the juice/sugar out of them in
> this state (is there?), as they are only 'smooshed', and we don't own/have
> access a press - any tips? Should I stick the bucket in the chest freezer
> for a while? Run them through a blender (bit-by-bit - it ain't even nearly
a
> 36 UK gal blender, unfortunately.....heheheh....)?

> Also, Will it be OK to ferment this pulp without diluting (we're going to
> add some blackberries and maybe elderberries to, maybe enough to make the
> pulp up to about 4-5 or so UK gal)? Or should we be looking at making 10
UK
> gal from this by adding sugar and water to the correct volume and gravity?

> The thing I'm worried about is, even if we get a good gravity from this
> (undiluted) juice without adding any/much sugar, is that it will be too
> acidic (the fruit is sweet, but the skins are rather acid, and tannic) to
> ferment as-is. Have no way of testing this at the moment. Also, if we
can't
> separate the juice from the pulp well, we aren't going to get anywhere
near
> accurate gravity readings (OK, I gave in this time and agreed to do the
> hydrometer thing, for the first time......).

> We are after a wine of about 15 - 17 % ABV, and bone dry. Haven't a clue
yet
> what OG I'm looking for to achieve this, either.

> TIA for any help, advice, flippant and/or sarcastic comments, insults to
my
> ancestors etc. (It's all good).

> Cheers!

> Shaun aRe

> A smile shared with another is 2 smiles.

> ',;~}~

 
 
 

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Shaun Rimme » Fri, 29 Aug 2003 22:08:23



Quote:


> > Hi again sagely folks of the wonderful world of wines.

> > My wife and I picked 44lbs of (I believe) Victoria plums last night from
a
> > friends garden - coulda picked twice that easily, but we only had about
an
> > hour and no use for 88lbs of plums...but I digress. These are very ripe
and
> > sweet indeed (but not rotten in the least!), and needed processing
straight
> > away (skins would 'slide off' with little effort - they would of all
browned
> > from the handling of picking them if left).

> > 36lb of them we squished the (2 and a bit lbs of) stones out of, and
mashed
> > (smooshed 'em good with our clean hands - didn't have the time left to
pulp
> > 'em smoothly) into a primary ferm bucket. This gave us 3.5 UK gal of
pulp. I
> > added 4 dissolved camden tablets and 4 tsp pectolase, sealed the lid on
and
> > left 'em.

> > Now, there's no way we are going to get all the juice/sugar out of them
in
> > this state (is there?), as they are only 'smooshed', and we don't
own/have
> > access a press - any tips? Should I stick the bucket in the chest
freezer
> > for a while? Run them through a blender (bit-by-bit - it ain't even
nearly a
> > 36 UK gal blender, unfortunately.....heheheh....)?

> > Also, Will it be OK to ferment this pulp without diluting (we're going
to
> > add some blackberries and maybe elderberries to, maybe enough to make
the
> > pulp up to about 4-5 or so UK gal)? Or should we be looking at making 10
UK
> > gal from this by adding sugar and water to the correct volume and
gravity?

> > The thing I'm worried about is, even if we get a good gravity from this
> > (undiluted) juice without adding any/much sugar, is that it will be too
> > acidic (the fruit is sweet, but the skins are rather acid, and tannic)
to
> > ferment as-is. Have no way of testing this at the moment. Also, if we
can't
> > separate the juice from the pulp well, we aren't going to get anywhere
near
> > accurate gravity readings (OK, I gave in this time and agreed to do the
> > hydrometer thing, for the first time......).

> > We are after a wine of about 15 - 17 % ABV, and bone dry. Haven't a clue
yet
> > what OG I'm looking for to achieve this, either.

> > TIA for any help, advice, flippant and/or sarcastic comments, insults to
my
> > ancestors etc. (It's all good).

> > Cheers!

> > Shaun aRe

> > A smile shared with another is 2 smiles.

> > ',;~}~

> Well, I think it all depends on what style of wine you are after. If you
> want a sweeter heavier port style wine, ferment without dilution. If you
> are looking for a dry table wine, I would dilute it by about half, bring
> the gravity up to about 1.090 and add some acid blend.

Thanks Greg. In the above, I said: "We are after a wine of about 15 - 17 %
ABV, and bone dry. Haven't a clue yet what OG I'm looking for to achieve
this, either."

I have a tendency to use more words than I need to sometimes, and details
can get lost in the bustle - sorry!

For a very dry wine, what % abv will an OG of 1.090 give me do you think,
roughly?

Quote:
> In order to get clear juice to measure the gravity, you could strain
> some of the pulp and filter it through a coffee filter.

Thanks - I'll have to do that when I've got the fruit better mashed - the
harder (and less sweet) pieces of fruit are still in bigger pieces and
holding juice.

Quote:
> Now, you have two options . .. you can add water to your pulp and
> ferment on that.

I'd like to ferment on the pulp, until the last stage - I've had much better
flavour and colour results like this, much better.

Quote:
> Since it is already breaking down with your pectin
> enzyme, you could try to press out the juice (add water first, or not
> add water) using a straining bag or sack cloth. Perhaps first straining
> through a coated wire mesh basket and then through a cloth or straining
> bag. This way you can then do a juice fermentation without the pulp.

> It will not hurt anything if you want to freeze it for later.

Again - thanks for your input Greg!

Shaun aRe

 
 
 

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Shaun Rimme » Fri, 29 Aug 2003 22:14:48



Quote:
> Hello,
> I've been wanting to do a plum wine, so when the plums went on sale I
> downloaded a recipe from Jack's site and then bought the recommended
number
> of pounds.  I took the pits out, cut them up, added a little sugar and
threw
> them in the fridge for about 30 minutes to let the sugar mix well with the
> fruit and them threw them in the freezer.  I will probably wait a couple
of
> months before I make the wine.  In the meantime, freezing will help break
> down the fruit.  Here's Jack's site; he's got tons of recipes and tips on
> making wine at home.   http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> Good luck
> Darlene

Hi Darlene - know about the freezer thing from the past - helps for making
lots of fruit based foods like coolis, over and above covering fresh fruit
with sugar ',;~}~

I was really wondering how much success I'd get with just the 'smooshing'
(love that word!), blending and pectic enzyme etc, with this sort of fruit,
or if I'd need to freeze to not be too wasteful. This will be the first time
I've made more than 4 or so gallons of wine (if I go for the dilute and make
~10) - guess I'm just e***d and a little nervous of wasting all this
wonderful fruit we were gifted with.

Thanks, and best of good fortune with the success of your own plumy
endeavours!

',;~}~

Shaun aRe

 
 
 

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Dar » Fri, 29 Aug 2003 23:00:19


I'm jealous you've got all that great fruit.  There's this winery up by my
Mom & Dad, they make a red/orange plum wine.  The first bottle I bought from
them was delicious.  It was about an 11% *** by volume, a pretty
red/orange color, and very fruity.  The second bottle I bought down here was
good, but not as good.  As with anything, I think it is the quality of the
fruit and the process by which you get the best taste from that fruit.  I've
heard it is difficult to get the wine to clear.  Anyway, good-luck and keep
us posted on what you're doing.  When I start this plum wine, it will be my
first batch, so I'm interested in how things go for you.
Darlene


Quote:



> > Hello,
> > I've been wanting to do a plum wine, so when the plums went on sale I
> > downloaded a recipe from Jack's site and then bought the recommended
> number
> > of pounds.  I took the pits out, cut them up, added a little sugar and
> threw
> > them in the fridge for about 30 minutes to let the sugar mix well with
the
> > fruit and them threw them in the freezer.  I will probably wait a couple
> of
> > months before I make the wine.  In the meantime, freezing will help
break
> > down the fruit.  Here's Jack's site; he's got tons of recipes and tips
on
> > making wine at home.   http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> > Good luck
> > Darlene

> Hi Darlene - know about the freezer thing from the past - helps for making
> lots of fruit based foods like coolis, over and above covering fresh fruit
> with sugar ',;~}~

> I was really wondering how much success I'd get with just the 'smooshing'
> (love that word!), blending and pectic enzyme etc, with this sort of
fruit,
> or if I'd need to freeze to not be too wasteful. This will be the first
time
> I've made more than 4 or so gallons of wine (if I go for the dilute and
make
> ~10) - guess I'm just e***d and a little nervous of wasting all this
> wonderful fruit we were gifted with.

> Thanks, and best of good fortune with the success of your own plumy
> endeavours!

> ',;~}~

> Shaun aRe

 
 
 

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Shaun Rimme » Sat, 30 Aug 2003 00:26:57



Quote:
> I'm jealous you've got all that great fruit.

Hi Darlene - we are lucky, in that we have a freind who has the tree, and
virtually no use for the fruit. The tree nearly always has a healthy crop,
but this year is a bonus - no frosts at a time that would have affected the
bees so the tree's flowers were very healthily polinated, and a long hot
growing season (certainly for England! Almost a record breaking year). This
means we are actually harvesting some Autumn fruits already, while some
others are over-ripe and past their best!

Quote:
> There's this winery up by my
> Mom & Dad, they make a red/orange plum wine.  The first bottle I bought
from
> them was delicious.  It was about an 11% *** by volume, a pretty
> red/orange color, and very fruity.  The second bottle I bought down here
was
> good, but not as good.  As with anything, I think it is the quality of the
> fruit and the process by which you get the best taste from that fruit.

It sure is, though we mere mortals can sometimes hit the mark by pure
accidental luck (what I tend to rely on!).

Quote:
> I've
> heard it is difficult to get the wine to clear.  Anyway, good-luck and
keep
> us posted on what you're doing.  When I start this plum wine, it will be
my
> first batch, so I'm interested in how things go for you.
> Darlene

This is my first batch too, although my wife has made it a couple of times
in the past with good results, based on 'country wine' recipes in older
books - I'm doing it differently this time, by way of experiment for us.

Will be certain to keep the group posted, afterall, next best thing to
making and drinking wine is duscussing it, no?

',;~}~

Cheers!

Shaun aRe - 'I just love making stuff'.

 
 
 

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Jack Kell » Sat, 30 Aug 2003 04:19:13


Shaun, I don't think you will get more than 7% *** fermenting as
is without adding sigar.  By "as is" I mean without adding water
either.

No matter how sweet they taste, plums rarely have a Brix suitable for
wine without chaptalizing.

I would let the pectic enzyme work a while (8 hours is fine), then
spoon some of the pulp into a cloth bag and squeeze.  Get enough juice
out to float your hydrometer and see where you are.

There is nothing wrong with adding sugar and water.  Just add the
water first, let it mingle with the pulp a while, and strain out
another test batch for the hydrometer (just a reality check).
Calculate your sugar and get to mixing.

My advice is not to shoot for 17% ***.  You'll never taste the
plum if you do unless you sweeten it back severely.  For plum, 13% is
plenty high and 11% is better.  But, it's your fruit and you are free
to do what you'd like.  If you still want the rocket fuel, use
Favourite or Gervin High Active *** Yeast or SB23 Super Yeast.

Jack Keller, The Winemaking Home Page
http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Ray » Sat, 30 Aug 2003 06:30:03


I did not understand if you had removed the skins.  Sounds like you may
have.  If you did it will be less acid and will end up light colored.  If
you left them in you will get some of the nice color as well.  Just two
different styles.  I would prefer to leave the skins.  I would also ferment
on the pulp and skins.  Smooosh them with your hands.  Great fun!  Don't
bother with a blender or press or anything.  Leave 5 days in the primary.
Twice or thrice (2ce or 3ce for Trevor) a day smooosh it with your hands
again.  After 5 days strain it thou a straining bag and squeeeze (not
smooosh).  You will get excellent yield that way.  Plums are notorious for
acid so get a recipe from Jack (or out of Berry's books as you are in the
UK) or somewhere else and follow it.  Or better, get an acid kit and check
the acidity.

IMHO, one of the biggest errors in making country wine is trying to make too
high of ***.  It ends up hot and not especially pleasant.  Of course it
also becomes a  ***ager magnet.  Aim for 12 to 13% on the first try.  Try
higher for the next batch if you want.

I envy you for all those tree ripened plums.  All I can get are store bought
and they are beautify but no flavor.  Good luck

Ray


Quote:
> Hi again sagely folks of the wonderful world of wines.

> My wife and I picked 44lbs of (I believe) Victoria plums last night from a
> friends garden - coulda picked twice that easily, but we only had about an
> hour and no use for 88lbs of plums...but I digress. These are very ripe
and
> sweet indeed (but not rotten in the least!), and needed processing
straight
> away (skins would 'slide off' with little effort - they would of all
browned
> from the handling of picking them if left).

> 36lb of them we squished the (2 and a bit lbs of) stones out of, and
mashed
> (smooshed 'em good with our clean hands - didn't have the time left to
pulp
> 'em smoothly) into a primary ferm bucket. This gave us 3.5 UK gal of pulp.
I
> added 4 dissolved camden tablets and 4 tsp pectolase, sealed the lid on
and
> left 'em.

> Now, there's no way we are going to get all the juice/sugar out of them in
> this state (is there?), as they are only 'smooshed', and we don't own/have
> access a press - any tips? Should I stick the bucket in the chest freezer
> for a while? Run them through a blender (bit-by-bit - it ain't even nearly
a
> 36 UK gal blender, unfortunately.....heheheh....)?

> Also, Will it be OK to ferment this pulp without diluting (we're going to
> add some blackberries and maybe elderberries to, maybe enough to make the
> pulp up to about 4-5 or so UK gal)? Or should we be looking at making 10
UK
> gal from this by adding sugar and water to the correct volume and gravity?

> The thing I'm worried about is, even if we get a good gravity from this
> (undiluted) juice without adding any/much sugar, is that it will be too
> acidic (the fruit is sweet, but the skins are rather acid, and tannic) to
> ferment as-is. Have no way of testing this at the moment. Also, if we
can't
> separate the juice from the pulp well, we aren't going to get anywhere
near
> accurate gravity readings (OK, I gave in this time and agreed to do the
> hydrometer thing, for the first time......).

> We are after a wine of about 15 - 17 % ABV, and bone dry. Haven't a clue
yet
> what OG I'm looking for to achieve this, either.

> TIA for any help, advice, flippant and/or sarcastic comments, insults to
my
> ancestors etc. (It's all good).

> Cheers!

> Shaun aRe

> A smile shared with another is 2 smiles.

> ',;~}~

 
 
 

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Greg Coo » Sat, 30 Aug 2003 07:20:47




Quote:

> Thanks Greg. In the above, I said: "We are after a wine of about 15 - 17 %
> ABV, and bone dry. Haven't a clue yet what OG I'm looking for to achieve
> this, either."

Yes, I saw that right after I posted my message, of course.

Quote:

> For a very dry wine, what % abv will an OG of 1.090 give me do you think,
> roughly?

1.090 would have a potential *** of about 12% when fermented out. If
you really want 15% you want to shoot for about 1.110. I think 15-17
would be too high for a 'very dry' wine, but that's my opinion.

You can find a good table of SG vs potential *** on Ben Rotter's web
page here: http://www.FoundCollection.com/~BRotter/CalcInfo/HdySugAl.htm

Quote:

> I'd like to ferment on the pulp, until the last stage - I've had much better
> flavour and colour results like this, much better.

I would favor this approach also.

Good luck and let us know how it turns out.

--Greg

 
 
 

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Dar » Sat, 30 Aug 2003 08:28:05


Ray,
Very interested in what you had to say.  I left the skins on my plums and
popped them in the freezer.  When I make my batch, I'm going to shoot for
11-12% ***.  I had some plum wine, and it was 11% and very tasty.  My
plums were store-bought too.
Darlene


Quote:
> I did not understand if you had removed the skins.  Sounds like you may
> have.  If you did it will be less acid and will end up light colored.  If
> you left them in you will get some of the nice color as well.  Just two
> different styles.  I would prefer to leave the skins.  I would also
ferment
> on the pulp and skins.  Smooosh them with your hands.  Great fun!  Don't
> bother with a blender or press or anything.  Leave 5 days in the primary.
> Twice or thrice (2ce or 3ce for Trevor) a day smooosh it with your hands
> again.  After 5 days strain it thou a straining bag and squeeeze (not
> smooosh).  You will get excellent yield that way.  Plums are notorious for
> acid so get a recipe from Jack (or out of Berry's books as you are in the
> UK) or somewhere else and follow it.  Or better, get an acid kit and check
> the acidity.

> IMHO, one of the biggest errors in making country wine is trying to make
too
> high of ***.  It ends up hot and not especially pleasant.  Of course
it
> also becomes a  ***ager magnet.  Aim for 12 to 13% on the first try.  Try
> higher for the next batch if you want.

> I envy you for all those tree ripened plums.  All I can get are store
bought
> and they are beautify but no flavor.  Good luck

> Ray



> > Hi again sagely folks of the wonderful world of wines.

> > My wife and I picked 44lbs of (I believe) Victoria plums last night from
a
> > friends garden - coulda picked twice that easily, but we only had about
an
> > hour and no use for 88lbs of plums...but I digress. These are very ripe
> and
> > sweet indeed (but not rotten in the least!), and needed processing
> straight
> > away (skins would 'slide off' with little effort - they would of all
> browned
> > from the handling of picking them if left).

> > 36lb of them we squished the (2 and a bit lbs of) stones out of, and
> mashed
> > (smooshed 'em good with our clean hands - didn't have the time left to
> pulp
> > 'em smoothly) into a primary ferm bucket. This gave us 3.5 UK gal of
pulp.
> I
> > added 4 dissolved camden tablets and 4 tsp pectolase, sealed the lid on
> and
> > left 'em.

> > Now, there's no way we are going to get all the juice/sugar out of them
in
> > this state (is there?), as they are only 'smooshed', and we don't
own/have
> > access a press - any tips? Should I stick the bucket in the chest
freezer
> > for a while? Run them through a blender (bit-by-bit - it ain't even
nearly
> a
> > 36 UK gal blender, unfortunately.....heheheh....)?

> > Also, Will it be OK to ferment this pulp without diluting (we're going
to
> > add some blackberries and maybe elderberries to, maybe enough to make
the
> > pulp up to about 4-5 or so UK gal)? Or should we be looking at making 10
> UK
> > gal from this by adding sugar and water to the correct volume and
gravity?

> > The thing I'm worried about is, even if we get a good gravity from this
> > (undiluted) juice without adding any/much sugar, is that it will be too
> > acidic (the fruit is sweet, but the skins are rather acid, and tannic)
to
> > ferment as-is. Have no way of testing this at the moment. Also, if we
> can't
> > separate the juice from the pulp well, we aren't going to get anywhere
> near
> > accurate gravity readings (OK, I gave in this time and agreed to do the
> > hydrometer thing, for the first time......).

> > We are after a wine of about 15 - 17 % ABV, and bone dry. Haven't a clue
> yet
> > what OG I'm looking for to achieve this, either.

> > TIA for any help, advice, flippant and/or sarcastic comments, insults to
> my
> > ancestors etc. (It's all good).

> > Cheers!

> > Shaun aRe

> > A smile shared with another is 2 smiles.

> > ',;~}~

 
 
 

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Shaun Rimme » Sat, 30 Aug 2003 17:57:40



Quote:


> > Thanks Greg. In the above, I said: "We are after a wine of about 15 - 17
%
> > ABV, and bone dry. Haven't a clue yet what OG I'm looking for to achieve
> > this, either."

> Yes, I saw that right after I posted my message, of course.

Ain't that just always the way of things? Heheheh....... ',;~}~

Quote:
> > For a very dry wine, what % abv will an OG of 1.090 give me do you
think,
> > roughly?

> 1.090 would have a potential *** of about 12% when fermented out. If
> you really want 15% you want to shoot for about 1.110.

Thanks for that.

Quote:
> I think 15-17
> would be too high for a 'very dry' wine, but that's my opinion.

Maybe I have strange tastes, heheh.......

I like a warming wine, but I'm not a fan of sweetness in anything apart from
my coffee, and icecream - I love the dry reds I've bought (the rare
occasions I find them) that are up around 15%.

Quote:
> You can find a good table of SG vs potential *** on Ben Rotter's web
> page here: http://www.FoundCollection.com/~BRotter/CalcInfo/HdySugAl.htm

Superb! Again, thanks ',;~}~

Quote:

> > I'd like to ferment on the pulp, until the last stage - I've had much
better
> > flavour and colour results like this, much better.

> I would favor this approach also.

> Good luck and let us know how it turns out.

Thanks yet again, and of course - will keep you 'posted'.

Cheers!

Shaun aRe

 
 
 

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Shaun Rimme » Sat, 30 Aug 2003 18:04:54



Quote:
> Shaun, I don't think you will get more than 7% *** fermenting as
> is without adding sigar.  By "as is" I mean without adding water
> either.

OK - noted, thanks.

Quote:
> No matter how sweet they taste, plums rarely have a Brix suitable for
> wine without chaptalizing.

> I would let the pectic enzyme work a while (8 hours is fine), then
> spoon some of the pulp into a cloth bag and squeeze.  Get enough juice
> out to float your hydrometer and see where you are.

Uh-huh........

Quote:
> There is nothing wrong with adding sugar and water.  Just add the
> water first, let it mingle with the pulp a while, and strain out
> another test batch for the hydrometer (just a reality check).
> Calculate your sugar and get to mixing.

> My advice is not to shoot for 17% ***.  You'll never taste the
> plum if you do unless you sweeten it back severely.  For plum, 13% is
> plenty high and 11% is better.  But, it's your fruit and you are free
> to do what you'd like.  If you still want the rocket fuel, use
> Favourite or Gervin High Active *** Yeast or SB23 Super Yeast.

The plums are going to be the base and body of the wine, but we are adding
blackcurrants and elderberries (lost around right now, and all deliciously
ripe) for colour and depth of character.

First time I had a (almost) well made elderberry wine, I was amazed at the
depth and complexity of flavour. It would have been an extremely wonderful
wine, but the friend who made it stupidly protected his hands from colouring
(he squished 'em by hand) with a brand new pair of 'Marigold' ***
(dishwashing) gloves. Even though we could taste all the other flavours,
this left the wine with the most awful ***y taste that made it ultimately
unbearable to drink. ;-(

Thanks Jack.

Shaun aRe - A glass of wine a day...............is several too few.

 
 
 

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Shaun Rimme » Sat, 30 Aug 2003 18:16:50



Quote:
> I did not understand if you had removed the skins.  Sounds like you may
> have.  If you did it will be less acid and will end up light colored.  If
> you left them in you will get some of the nice color as well.  Just two
> different styles.  I would prefer to leave the skins.  I would also
ferment
> on the pulp and skins.  Smooosh them with your hands.  Great fun!

Oh, I left the skins! I love a good tannin bite to a wine and wouldn't dream
of removing the skins! I will be fermenting on the pulp also. And yes,
smooshing them with our hands was great fun, but it did turn the palms of my
hands a really interesting 'false tan' brown, and left them burning a little
for a day. Also, those peach stones are _sharp_!!!!!!! My wife and I both
have a nice collection of finger lacerations.

Is *** detrimental to a good fruit wine? ',;~}~

Quote:
> Don't
> bother with a blender or press or anything.  Leave 5 days in the primary.
> Twice or thrice (2ce or 3ce for Trevor) a day smooosh it with your hands
> again.  After 5 days strain it thou a straining bag and squeeeze (not
> smooosh).  You will get excellent yield that way.

What I'm worried about here, is if I adjust the gravity of the starting
juice, ferment for 5 days, then squish through a bag, I'm going to again
alter the gravity, and because some fermentation has already ocurred, will
not be able to know which way or by how much to adjust it again?

Quote:
> Plums are notorious for
> acid so get a recipe from Jack (or out of Berry's books as you are in the
> UK) or somewhere else and follow it.  Or better, get an acid kit and check
> the acidity.

Thanks - makes good sense.

Quote:
> IMHO, one of the biggest errors in making country wine is trying to make
too
> high of ***.  It ends up hot and not especially pleasant.

So far, I've made quite a few 'country' (non-grape, fresh fruit) wines, most
have been reasonably high *** (greater than 14%, up to 18%), and for the
most part, they've turned out smooth and warming.

Quote:
> Of course it
> also becomes a  ***ager magnet.

Heheheh - no ***agers about! We do (well my wife does) have a 12 year old
daughter, but she can't abide wine, nor could she handle punishment for
taking it (heheheh), so, I think we're safe!

Quote:
> Aim for 12 to 13% on the first try.  Try
> higher for the next batch if you want.

> I envy you for all those tree ripened plums.  All I can get are store
bought
> and they are beautify but no flavor.  Good luck

> Ray

Yes, I envy me for them too! Heheheheh........

They do have a heckuva lot more flavour than the store bought ones from
around here, that's for sure.

Thanks Ray ',;~}~

Prost!

Shaun aRe

 
 
 

Plums pulped for wine - tips needed!

Post by Shaun Rimme » Sat, 30 Aug 2003 22:27:45



Quote:


> > Thanks Greg. In the above, I said: "We are after a wine of about 15 - 17
%
> > ABV, and bone dry. Haven't a clue yet what OG I'm looking for to achieve
> > this, either."

> Yes, I saw that right after I posted my message, of course.

> > For a very dry wine, what % abv will an OG of 1.090 give me do you
think,
> > roughly?

> 1.090 would have a potential *** of about 12% when fermented out. If
> you really want 15% you want to shoot for about 1.110. I think 15-17
> would be too high for a 'very dry' wine, but that's my opinion.

> You can find a good table of SG vs potential *** on Ben Rotter's web
> page here: http://www.FoundCollection.com/~BRotter/CalcInfo/HdySugAl.htm

Sorry, but the page or the file that you're looking for is not here.
. Please check to see that you've entered the correct URL.
. The owner of this site may have chosen to delete their membership.
. The site may have been removed due to a violation of Tripod's Terms of
Service.
. The site may have been moved to a different URL.

But I managed to correct the URL - thanks, lots useful! ',;~}~

"http://www.FoundCollection.com/~BRotter/CalcInfo/HydSugAl.htm"

(Hdy was instead of Hyd for anyone else's reference).

Shaun aRe