bulk aging vs. bottle aging

bulk aging vs. bottle aging

Post by od.. » Wed, 23 Oct 1996 04:00:00



     I was talking with someone who runs a wine making business about
time required to brew the kits that they supply to their customers, and
about  bulk aging vs bottle aging.  He said that they have their kits ready
for thier customers to bottle in 4 weeks even if they used a '6 week kit'.
      His belief is that wine ages in the bottle better than in bulk.  I
have always thought the opposite but I have been making wine only
for 2 and a bit years and therefore am unclear on this.

     Does anyone have any comments regarding this topic?

Patti

 
 
 

bulk aging vs. bottle aging

Post by John Soane » Thu, 24 Oct 1996 04:00:00




Quote:
>      I was talking with someone who runs a wine making business about
> time required to brew the kits that they supply to their customers, and
> about  bulk aging vs bottle aging.  He said that they have their kits
ready
> for thier customers to bottle in 4 weeks even if they used a '6 week kit'

Many operators that run on-premise shops are clueless about wine making.
Their first batch is often made when they open their doors for business.

Quote:
>       His belief is that wine ages in the bottle better than in bulk.  I
> have always thought the opposite but I have been making wine only
> for 2 and a bit years and therefore am unclear on this.

Real wine benefits from both types of aging, but it typically does better
in bulk, which is why many good commercial wines are held in bulk 2 years
or more.  If it wasn't of great benefit wineries would bottle for economic
reasons, their inventory doesn't generate any revenue sitting in their
cellar and their casks represent a huge expense.

I just bottled my 1995 Chardonnay a few days ago and other my other whites
in September.  I will be bottling red varieties this week to free up
storage for my 1996 efforts.  Personally, I think rushing wine into the
bottle is a mistake; the further wine develops in bulk, the quicker it will
come around in the bottle.

I have little use for wine kits. I don't think it matters much what you do
to them, after concentrating and pasteurization there is very little of
what makes the grape distinctive left.  Which is why they taste pretty much
the same.