High acidity problem??

High acidity problem??

Post by TomS » Mon, 28 Sep 1998 04:00:00



I've found that high acidity can be corrected quite painlessly by  adding
potassium hydroxide.  You want to be careful when handling this, and don't
use too much.  You have to calculate the right amount, and tasting trials on
small samples would be wise.  Try it on a half bottle size batch by adding a
measured amount, refrigerating the sample to precipitate the potassium
bitartrate, and tasting the wine after several days of refrigeration.  I've
turned undrinkable Chardonnay into gold medal award winning wine with this
technique.  The commercial wineries are not permitted to use KOH.  They have
to use KHCO3 (potassium bicarbonate), which works OK, but creates lots of
foaming due to the release of carbon dioxide.

Tom S

 
 
 

High acidity problem??

Post by (s.. » Mon, 28 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>Early this summer I experimented with a recipe for strawberry wine. My
>problem came about when I checked the acid and it was very low. In all my
>brilliance I added a bit too much acid. The wine is pushing the limits of
max
>wine acidity. I was wondering if anyone has any suggestions as to how I
could
>go about lowering the acidity. I plan on adding suger to sweeten. Is that A
>solution. How about adding an amount of frozen strawberry concentrate. The
>wine has an excellent taste apart from the acid. Could I try to blend with
>grape juice?? Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

If you have access to some decent quality strawberries, you can mash some and
make some more juice according to your recipe and blend with your wine right
now if it's not in bottles yet.  This should help balance your acidity.

From the FAQ:

G21. ACID BALANCE

Finished wines usually should have the following acid levels (expressed
as tartaric acid):

Fruit wines       0.60%  6.0g/L  6000ppm
Red grape wines   0.65%  6.5g/L  6500ppm
White grape wines 0.75%  7.5g/L  7500ppm
Sherry types      0.50%  5.0g/L  5000ppm

Common fruits will have the following acid levels:

Apple:        1.0%- 6.5%
Apricot:      6.0%-15.0%
Black Cherry: 3.5%- 7.0%
Elderberry:   6.0%-15.0%
Orange:       0.0%-35.0%
Peach:        3.0%-10.0%
Pear:         1.0%- 3.5%

1 ounce of acid blend will raise 5 imp. gal. by 0.13%. 1/4 ounce
calcium carbonate chalk or 1/3 ounce potassium carbonate chalk per
gallon will lower acid by 0.15%. Maximum recommended chalk is 0.5 ounce
calcium chalk per gallon to avoid a faint chalky taste. Potassium
bicarbonate produces better results with less taste then calcium
carbonate, and will work better with cold stabilization.

If your wine is really high in acid (VERY low pH), add some water or
mix with a wine with a VERY high pH. Alternately, add a 0.5%
sugar solution to your carbouy about 1-2 days AFTER you have added
potassium sorbate to "stop" the fermentation. (0.5% = about 1 cup of
sugar/5 gal. of wine).

Here is an conversion table with tartaric to sulphuric equivalent:

ACID LEVEL (most useful range)

Tartaric Sulphuric
 (g/L)    (%)
  7.7     0.5
 15.3     1.0
 22.9     1.5
 30.6     2.0
 38.3     2.5
 45.9     3.0
 53.6     3.5
 61.2     4.0
 68.9     4.5
 76.5     5.0
 84.2     5.5
 91.9     6.0
 99.6     6.5
100.7     7.0

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High acidity problem??

Post by bart engelbee » Tue, 29 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Any idea why commercial wineries aren't permitted to use KOH?



Quote:
> I've found that high acidity can be corrected quite painlessly by  adding
> potassium hydroxide.  You want to be careful when handling this, and
don't
> use too much.  You have to calculate the right amount, and tasting trials
on
> small samples would be wise.  Try it on a half bottle size batch by
adding a
> measured amount, refrigerating the sample to precipitate the potassium
> bitartrate, and tasting the wine after several days of refrigeration.
I've
> turned undrinkable Chardonnay into gold medal award winning wine with
this
> technique.  The commercial wineries are not permitted to use KOH.  They
have
> to use KHCO3 (potassium bicarbonate), which works OK, but creates lots of
> foaming due to the release of carbon dioxide.

> Tom S

 
 
 

High acidity problem??

Post by TomS » Tue, 29 Sep 1998 04:00:00


I don't know why commercial wineries are not permitted to use KOH, but I am
well aware that it is a drastic treatment.  The sanctioning authorities tend
to look askance at using anything labeled "POISON" or "CORROSIVE" in the
production of food.

Tom S

 
 
 

High acidity problem??

Post by MnSR » Thu, 01 Oct 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>I've found that high acidity can be corrected quite painlessly by  adding
>potassium hydroxide.  You want to be careful when handling this, and don't
>use too much.  You have to calculate the right amount, and tasting trials on
>small samples would be wise.  Try it on a half bottle size batch by adding a
>measured amount, refrigerating the sample to precipitate the potassium
>bitartrate, and tasting the wine after several days of refrigeration.  I've
>turned undrinkable Chardonnay into gold medal award winning wine with this
>technique.  The commercial wineries are not permitted to use KOH.  They have
>to use KHCO3 (potassium bicarbonate), which works OK, but creates lots of
>foaming due to the release of carbon dioxide.

>Tom S

Can you give an example?  Say you're working with five gallons of strawberry
must and you want to reduce the acidity from 8000 ppm tartaric to 6500 ppm.
Approximately how much KOH would you add?  Thanks.
Martin J. Crane