Newbie fruit wine question

Newbie fruit wine question

Post by Jim K. Robertso » Thu, 10 Apr 2003 13:26:47



I have added cold water (10 imperial gallons) to my frozen
strawberries (48lbs.) only to have been told by a friend that I should
have added hot water to melt the sugar that I plan on adding after the
strawberries melt. I think I will have approximately 12 imperial
gallons of juice after I strain out the fruit and seeds. My question
is can I add sugar to my room temperature juice stir it well and then
add my 1118 yeast? Does the sugar have to be completely melted for the
yeast to convert it to ***?    
 
 
 

Newbie fruit wine question

Post by Roge » Fri, 11 Apr 2003 01:38:32


Jim,
    The reason I put hot water on strawberries is to help break them down.
Adding the sugar to the hot water helps dissolve the sugar quicker.  I
believe the yeast will break down the sugar even if it was a big lump,
though not as fast.  Just stir your sugar in before adding the yeast.  If
you already added the yeast, then add a couple of cups of sugar every day
until you get it all in.  BE CAREFUL if your wine is already fermenting.  It
may create a "volcanic" reaction, especially in a carboy
Good Luck to ya :}

Rog



Quote:
> I have added cold water (10 imperial gallons) to my frozen
> strawberries (48lbs.) only to have been told by a friend that I should
> have added hot water to melt the sugar that I plan on adding after the
> strawberries melt. I think I will have approximately 12 imperial
> gallons of juice after I strain out the fruit and seeds. My question
> is can I add sugar to my room temperature juice stir it well and then
> add my 1118 yeast? Does the sugar have to be completely melted for the
> yeast to convert it to ***?


 
 
 

Newbie fruit wine question

Post by Ben Rott » Fri, 11 Apr 2003 21:01:25


Quote:
> I have added cold water (10 imperial gallons) to my frozen
> strawberries (48lbs.) only to have been told by a friend that I should
> have added hot water to melt the sugar that I plan on adding after the
> strawberries melt. I think I will have approximately 12 imperial
> gallons of juice after I strain out the fruit and seeds. My question
> is can I add sugar to my room temperature juice stir it well and then
> add my 1118 yeast? Does the sugar have to be completely melted for the
> yeast to convert it to ***?

The sugar should be fully dissolved, but you don't need to use hot
water to achieve this. A warmer temperature will make it easier to
dissolve the sugar, but at room temperature it doesn't take a great
deal of effort to dissolve the normal concentrations of sugar used for
table wine anyway.

Actually, there are some winemakers who are positively against using
heat in must preparation. They feel it can release valuable volatile
aromas, and extract unwanted phenolics.

Ben
Improved Winemaking
http://www.FoundCollection.com/~BRotter/

 
 
 

Newbie fruit wine question

Post by Jim K. Robertso » Sat, 12 Apr 2003 02:53:14


So it sounds if I can raise the must up to room temperature and give
it a few good stirs I will dissolve the sugar. Thank you for the
advise.



Quote:
>> I have added cold water (10 imperial gallons) to my frozen
>> strawberries (48lbs.) only to have been told by a friend that I should
>> have added hot water to melt the sugar that I plan on adding after the
>> strawberries melt. I think I will have approximately 12 imperial
>> gallons of juice after I strain out the fruit and seeds. My question
>> is can I add sugar to my room temperature juice stir it well and then
>> add my 1118 yeast? Does the sugar have to be completely melted for the
>> yeast to convert it to ***?

>The sugar should be fully dissolved, but you don't need to use hot
>water to achieve this. A warmer temperature will make it easier to
>dissolve the sugar, but at room temperature it doesn't take a great
>deal of effort to dissolve the normal concentrations of sugar used for
>table wine anyway.

>Actually, there are some winemakers who are positively against using
>heat in must preparation. They feel it can release valuable volatile
>aromas, and extract unwanted phenolics.

>Ben
>Improved Winemaking
>http://www.FoundCollection.com/~BRotter/