Not Fermenting

Not Fermenting

Post by Joe Frederic » Tue, 08 Aug 2000 04:00:00



I am making a blueberry wine for the first time and it appears that the
fermentation will not start. here are some ingredents from the recipe I
followed

12 lbs fruit
8 campden tabs
tannin
2 tsp acid blend
2 tsp yeast nutrient
1 package Premier Cuvee yeast
about 10 lbs sugar
1 1/2 quart grape juice concentrate
13 quarts of water.

My primary fermentor is at about 5 gals. I waited 24 hours and the
fermntation still has not started. I followed the instruction to start
another pack of yeast. it bubbled in the bowl but did not when I added it to
the must. My temp is Around 82 and s.g. 1.100. The only other thinkg I can
think of is that I have too much sulphite. If this is true how do I correct
the balance of sulphite? I am wiating another day or so and then what. Any
ideas??

Joe

 
 
 

Not Fermenting

Post by jackkelle » Wed, 09 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Joe, you gave it a healthy dose of Campden, but not too much.  I would
add 3 more teaspoons of yeast nutrient, another teaspoon of acid blend,
and stir that in well.  It will give your must a better balance.

Take a half cup of your must and put it in a bowl with one-and-a-half
cups of warm water and stir to mix.  Open a new packet of yeast and
sprinkle it over the top of the mixture, but do not stir the yeast in.
Just let it sit on top and absorb the moisture.  It should start
bubbling within a half hour.  Lightly stir the yeast just enough to
break the surface.  Give it another half hour and then stir in another
half-cup of must.  Let it sit about an hour.  It should really be going
well by now.  Stir in another half-cup of must and wait another hour.
If it is still working well, gently pour it over the surface of your
must.  Do not stir.  Cover the primary and let it sit 10-12 hours, then
stir to a depth of 6-8 inches.  Recover the primary and wait another
10-12 hours.  Then stir it deeply.  It should take off.

Jack Keller, The Winemaking Home Page,
http://www.geocities.com/NapaValley/1172/

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

Not Fermenting

Post by Scot Mc Pherso » Wed, 09 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Joe,
    Did you get this recipe from Stanely Andersen's Winemaking? This looks
suspiciously like one of his recipes.

That is a lot of camden...5 Tablets is more than sufficient in most 5 gallon
recipes, 6 if you really want to be on the "safe" side. 5 really is already
a very safe quantity.

Scot


Quote:
> I am making a blueberry wine for the first time and it appears that the
> fermentation will not start. here are some ingredents from the recipe I
> followed

> 12 lbs fruit
> 8 campden tabs
> tannin
> 2 tsp acid blend
> 2 tsp yeast nutrient
> 1 package Premier Cuvee yeast
> about 10 lbs sugar
> 1 1/2 quart grape juice concentrate
> 13 quarts of water.

> My primary fermentor is at about 5 gals. I waited 24 hours and the
> fermntation still has not started. I followed the instruction to start
> another pack of yeast. it bubbled in the bowl but did not when I added it
to
> the must. My temp is Around 82 and s.g. 1.100. The only other thinkg I can
> think of is that I have too much sulphite. If this is true how do I
correct
> the balance of sulphite? I am wiating another day or so and then what. Any
> ideas??

> Joe

 
 
 

Not Fermenting

Post by Jack Kelle » Wed, 09 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Scot, I'll admit that 8 tabs is more than I would add to 5
gallons, but he said he's using Red Star Premier Curvee yeast,
which is a very strong yeast, so it should be able to handle the
large dose of Campden.  I imagine what he did is stir in the
yeast, which is something I learned a very long time ago only
retards a good start.  Yeast should be surface started, where it
gets plenty of oxygen, and slowly--very slowly--coaxed deeper and
deeper into the must.  I always do it this way and I usually have
a roaring ferment withing 2-3 hours of activation.

Jack Keller, The Winemaking Home Page
http://www.geocities.com/winemaking/

-----------------------------------------------------------

Got questions?  Get answers over the phone at Keen.com.
Up to 100 minutes free!
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Not Fermenting

Post by Julian R Frankli » Wed, 09 Aug 2000 04:00:00


I read that west coast blueberries contain a natural sorbate which inhibits
fermentation whereas the east coat varieties do not contain the natural
sorbate.
Regards,
Rex

Quote:
> Scot, I'll admit that 8 tabs is more than I would add to 5
> gallons, but he said he's using Red Star Premier Curvee yeast,
> which is a very strong yeast, so it should be able to handle the
> large dose of Campden.  I imagine what he did is stir in the
> yeast, which is something I learned a very long time ago only
> retards a good start.  Yeast should be surface started, where it
> gets plenty of oxygen, and slowly--very slowly--coaxed deeper and
> deeper into the must.  I always do it this way and I usually have
> a roaring ferment withing 2-3 hours of activation.

> Jack Keller, The Winemaking Home Page
> http://www.geocities.com/winemaking/

> -----------------------------------------------------------

> Got questions?  Get answers over the phone at Keen.com.
> Up to 100 minutes free!
> http://www.keen.com

 
 
 

Not Fermenting

Post by ploegma » Wed, 09 Aug 2000 04:00:00


The eastern wild blueberry DOES contain this inhibitor !!  This is why so
many have problems with blueberry wine.  I have found the solution to be
to reduce the acid instead of increasing it.  If you haven't yet added the
extra acid that JK recommended,  don't.  Instead, reduce it to a PH of
3.7-3.8   Cuvee is a very strong yeast which should then take it all the way
to dryness (SG ~0.990).  At this point you can readjust the acid/sugar
ballance during finishing/polishing steps.


Quote:
> I read that west coast blueberries contain a natural sorbate which
inhibits
> fermentation whereas the east coat varieties do not contain the natural
> sorbate.
> Regards,
> Rex


> > Scot, I'll admit that 8 tabs is more than I would add to 5
> > gallons, but he said he's using Red Star Premier Curvee yeast,
> > which is a very strong yeast, so it should be able to handle the
> > large dose of Campden.  I imagine what he did is stir in the
> > yeast, which is something I learned a very long time ago only
> > retards a good start.  Yeast should be surface started, where it
> > gets plenty of oxygen, and slowly--very slowly--coaxed deeper and
> > deeper into the must.  I always do it this way and I usually have
> > a roaring ferment withing 2-3 hours of activation.

> > Jack Keller, The Winemaking Home Page
> > http://www.geocities.com/winemaking/

> > -----------------------------------------------------------

> > Got questions?  Get answers over the phone at Keen.com.
> > Up to 100 minutes free!
> > http://www.keen.com

 
 
 

Not Fermenting

Post by Scot Mc Pherso » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Hey Jack,
    Yes of course I know this about starting a packet of dry yeast. I am not
exactly sure why it works that way though. Maybe its because the additional
available oxygen helps the survival rate at rehydration, or at least a
speedy recovery from hybernation shock. When I feel inclined, or I am using
a strain of yeast which I haven't extra supply, I make a starter culture,
and that certainly kicks in a good ferment very quickly. Usually within a
few hours.

Most books I have read suggest allow the starter 48 hour to fully develop,
but in most cases I have found that cultures of 2 to 4 hours of age are the
strongest starters, and waiting 48 hours produces a culture that is
apparently more "spent", and takes longer to start the ferment in the
primary. What's your experience with this Jack?

Scot


Quote:
> Scot, I'll admit that 8 tabs is more than I would add to 5
> gallons, but he said he's using Red Star Premier Curvee yeast,
> which is a very strong yeast, so it should be able to handle the
> large dose of Campden.  I imagine what he did is stir in the
> yeast, which is something I learned a very long time ago only
> retards a good start.  Yeast should be surface started, where it
> gets plenty of oxygen, and slowly--very slowly--coaxed deeper and
> deeper into the must.  I always do it this way and I usually have
> a roaring ferment withing 2-3 hours of activation.

> Jack Keller, The Winemaking Home Page
> http://www.geocities.com/winemaking/

> -----------------------------------------------------------

> Got questions?  Get answers over the phone at Keen.com.
> Up to 100 minutes free!
> http://www.keen.com

 
 
 

Not Fermenting

Post by jackkelle » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
> I read that west coast blueberries contain a natural sorbate which
> inhibits fermentation whereas the east coat varieties do not....

I have heard something similar, but have never seen authoritative
confirmation of this.  But, for the record, all my blueberry wines have
been made with western blueberries and I have never had a problem
initiating fermentation.

Jack Keller, The Winemaking Home Page,
http://www.geocities.com/NapaValley/1172/

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

Not Fermenting

Post by ploegma » Wed, 16 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Did you ever get it started?


Quote:
> I am making a blueberry wine for the first time and it appears that the
> fermentation will not start. here are some ingredents from the recipe I
> followed

> 12 lbs fruit
> 8 campden tabs
> tannin
> 2 tsp acid blend
> 2 tsp yeast nutrient
> 1 package Premier Cuvee yeast
> about 10 lbs sugar
> 1 1/2 quart grape juice concentrate
> 13 quarts of water.

> My primary fermentor is at about 5 gals. I waited 24 hours and the
> fermntation still has not started. I followed the instruction to start
> another pack of yeast. it bubbled in the bowl but did not when I added it
to
> the must. My temp is Around 82 and s.g. 1.100. The only other thinkg I can
> think of is that I have too much sulphite. If this is true how do I
correct
> the balance of sulphite? I am wiating another day or so and then what. Any
> ideas??

> Joe