EARLIER Bottling vs LATER Bottling

EARLIER Bottling vs LATER Bottling

Post by Daniel Alfie » Tue, 15 Oct 1996 04:00:00



Without employing filtration equipment, is there difference in bottling
wines at an early stage (assuming it has already cleared) as opposed to
letting it sit in bulk a little longer? Any difference between Reds and
Whites?

If you have experienced the differences, could you explain why one is
preferable over the other?

I have noticed a 'flatter' taste, after about one year, with a portion of
the Red wines which I left in bulk compared to the bottled wine. No
oxidation noticed. Also, I noticed no difference between a jug with
airlock and a jug with airtight cap.

Why?

Thanks for any insights.     Giovanni.

 
 
 

EARLIER Bottling vs LATER Bottling

Post by Craig Colli » Thu, 24 Oct 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

> Without employing filtration equipment, is there difference in bottling
> wines at an early stage (assuming it has already cleared) as opposed to
> letting it sit in bulk a little longer? Any difference between Reds and
> Whites?

> If you have experienced the differences, could you explain why one is
> preferable over the other?

> I have noticed a 'flatter' taste, after about one year, with a portion of
> the Red wines which I left in bulk compared to the bottled wine. No
> oxidation noticed. Also, I noticed no difference between a jug with
> airlock and a jug with airtight cap.

> Why?

> Thanks for any insights.     Giovanni.

I am told wine ages faster in the bottle, but better in bulk.  To test
this, I delayed the bottling of my last pumpkin by four months.  Either
the pumpkins were significantly better, or it is true.  I found the wine
not as harsh and more flavorable after letting it sit in the carboy longer

Craig

 
 
 

EARLIER Bottling vs LATER Bottling

Post by Daniel Alfie » Fri, 25 Oct 1996 04:00:00




Quote:




Quote:

>> Without employing filtration equipment, is there difference in
bottling
>> wines at an early stage (assuming it has already cleared) as opposed
to
>> letting it sit in bulk a little longer? Any difference between Reds
and
>> Whites?

>> If you have experienced the differences, could you explain why one is
>> preferable over the other?

>> I have noticed a 'flatter' taste, after about one year, with a portion
of
>> the Red wines which I left in bulk compared to the bottled wine. No
>> oxidation noticed. Also, I noticed no difference between a jug with
>> airlock and a jug with airtight cap.

>> Why?

>> Thanks for any insights.     Giovanni.

>I am told wine ages faster in the bottle, but better in bulk.  To test
>this, I delayed the bottling of my last pumpkin by four months.  Either
>the pumpkins were significantly better, or it is true.  I found the wine
>not as harsh and more flavorable after letting it sit in the carboy
longer

>Craig

This confirms my experience. So, longer bulk aging for Reds. I guess,
also, that I should watch the length of the bulk-aging to prevent the
'flatter' taste. Matter of choice.

Is it the same for Whites?
Giovanni.

 
 
 

EARLIER Bottling vs LATER Bottling

Post by Don Schill » Tue, 29 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>Without employing filtration equipment, is there difference in bottling
>wines at an early stage (assuming it has already cleared) as opposed to
>letting it sit in bulk a little longer? Any difference between Reds and
>Whites?

Oh yes.  Big differences.

White wines, may be more 'fruity' then a dryer tannic red wine.  If
bottled sooner, the white will preserve that fresher flavor.  A red
wine will age better (in my opinion) bulk aged rather then bottle
aged.

Quote:
>If you have experienced the differences, could you explain why one is
>preferable over the other?

My opinion, bottle fruity whites early as possible, let red wines age.
I let them age until I need the carboy or until it tastes like I want
it to taste.

Quote:
>I have noticed a 'flatter' taste, after about one year, with a portion of
>the Red wines which I left in bulk compared to the bottled wine. No
>oxidation noticed. Also, I noticed no difference between a jug with
>airlock and a jug with airtight cap.

As far as the flatter taste is it flat or smooth?  Is the problem acid
or tannin?  If it is acid, adding acid will correct that problem.

Quote:
>Why?
>Thanks for any insights.     Giovanni.

Don

Winemaker, Landlord, Adventurer
Owner of "Flowers in the Village" flower shop.

 
 
 

EARLIER Bottling vs LATER Bottling

Post by Daniel Alfie » Wed, 30 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>>I have noticed a 'flatter' taste, after about one year, with a portion
of
>>the Red wines which I left in bulk compared to the bottled wine. No
>>oxidation noticed. Also, I noticed no difference between a jug with
>>airlock and a jug with airtight cap.

>As far as the flatter taste is it flat or smooth?  

This was my '94 Sauvignon. I bottled some one year later, in 1995, and
left some in a gallon jug with an airlock. Two years later, Sept.'96, I
opened a bottle and compared it to the jug ('bulk aged'). The jug wine
tasted 'flatter', more 'washed out' than the bottled wine. Definitely not
an acid problem, and not smoother. I was careful in making this
evaluation, and this is why I am puzzled!.. It doesn't make much sense
and I am trying to find out why.

Quote:
>Is the problem acid or tannin?  If it is acid, adding acid will correct

that problem.

My starting acidity, by the way, was 5.9 sulphuric: a little high,
perhaps. I also tried with this batch to prevent tannin extraction, to
see how the wine would turn out. I took it off the primary at SG 1.030.
So, no tannin either. The bottled Sauvignon tasted OK, still young, good
flavour and colour, a LITTLE taste of tannin. I am curious to see how
this wine will age.

Thanks for your comments, Don. I take heed of your opinion on the whites.
Cheers.  Giovanni.

 
 
 

EARLIER Bottling vs LATER Bottling

Post by Dan Razze » Wed, 30 Oct 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

> This was my '94 Sauvignon. I bottled some one year later, in 1995, and
> left some in a gallon jug with an airlock. Two years later, Sept.'96, I
> opened a bottle and compared it to the jug ('bulk aged'). The jug wine
> tasted 'flatter', more 'washed out' than the bottled wine.
> ...

Could it be due to oxidation?  Was there any difference in color between
the two?  And out of curiosity, was there any difference in aroma, or just
flavor?

The problem may be that airlocks are not perfect seals.  The ***
stopper that you would normally use with them is tapered and therefore
makes a fairly small contact area with the glass, but also the water in
the airlock slowly dissolves and releases gases in both directions.  Of
course you would use a sulphite solution rather than pure water, and I
think that helps to some degree control oxygen, but the solution
needs to be replaced every few weeks to be effective, and that is
something people often neglect during long term storage.

An airlock in a 50 gallon barrel is not a better seal, but its effect
is much smaller than on a 1 gallon jug.  I've read that the recommended
treatment for jugs is to cork or bung them, wire the bung in place, and
lay them on their sides to keep the wood moist.

--

    . o o .     Laboratory for Computational Intelligence
    . >v< .     University of British Columbia
_____mm.mm_____ http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

EARLIER Bottling vs LATER Bottling

Post by BillFi » Mon, 04 Nov 1996 04:00:00


Hello and HELP!

I recently bottled 24 bottles of Chianti from Vintners Reserve Kit and
noticed a slight offputting smell and ever so slight carbonation upon
tasting. Is this "normal" and if so, will they even out during bottling? I
followed the directions to the letter except for leaving wine in carboy an
extra 10 days because I was out of town.

Thanks for your time!

Sincerely,
Wm Olsen