Wines that will last for 10 years

Wines that will last for 10 years

Post by Fred » Thu, 28 Jun 2001 22:52:14



I want to make some wine that I can age for up to 10 years and will have
a shelf life of another 2 or 3 years after that.

What must I do to make a wine so it will be for the long term?

My thoughts are:

    just a little more tartness (which also gives us a lower pH)
    less harsh tannins (from seeds, stems and skins)
    more soft tannins (from French oak barrels)
    more concentration of flavors (saigner, extended cold soak, and
plenty of barrel aging)

Did I miss anything?

Thank you, Fred Barfarkel

 
 
 

Wines that will last for 10 years

Post by Tom » Fri, 29 Jun 2001 04:43:33



Quote:
> I want to make some wine that I can age for up to 10 years and will have
> a shelf life of another 2 or 3 years after that.

> What must I do to make a wine so it will be for the long term?

> My thoughts are:

>     just a little more tartness (which also gives us a lower pH)
>     less harsh tannins (from seeds, stems and skins)
>     more soft tannins (from French oak barrels)
>     more concentration of flavors (saigner, extended cold soak, and
> plenty of barrel aging)

I wouldn't go too low on the pH or you'll end up with an old wine that's
still too acidic to be pleasant drinking.  A pH of about 3.5 is about right
for most reds, but even 3.7 isn't too high to preclude aging well.

Cold soaking will help you get the best color extraction from the skins;
extended maceration before pressing will encourage the formation of soft
tannins.  You need to be on the alert, however, for H2S and spoilage
problems when extending the time after dryness and before pressing.  That
means stirring the lees until ML is finished and keeping air away from the
must.

Oak aging will not extend the longevity of the wine;  quite the converse.  A
well tended red wine should easily last more than ten years however - even
if it has been barrel aged.  I've even had some of my _white_ wines last
that long.

Tom S

 
 
 

Wines that will last for 10 years

Post by Kay Sexto » Fri, 29 Jun 2001 06:49:15



Quote:
> I want to make some wine that I can age for up to 10 years and will have
> a shelf life of another 2 or 3 years after that.

> What must I do to make a wine so it will be for the long term?

Develop a degree of patience normally reserved for saints and other kinds of
dead people?

K

 
 
 

Wines that will last for 10 years

Post by Tim ODonnel » Fri, 29 Jun 2001 06:50:25


Well said, Very well said.

Tim ODonnell

Quote:



> > I want to make some wine that I can age for up to 10 years and will have
> > a shelf life of another 2 or 3 years after that.

> > What must I do to make a wine so it will be for the long term?

> Develop a degree of patience normally reserved for saints and other kinds of
> dead people?

> K

 
 
 

Wines that will last for 10 years

Post by John DeFior » Fri, 29 Jun 2001 08:01:51


Very cute, Kay :)

I agree with what Tom said, but I would think that you would need lots of
tannins from at least the skins to give the wine enough structure to last.
The harsher tannins should soften and polymerize with age, no?

Regards,

St. John


Quote:



> > I want to make some wine that I can age for up to 10 years and will have
> > a shelf life of another 2 or 3 years after that.

> > What must I do to make a wine so it will be for the long term?

> Develop a degree of patience normally reserved for saints and other kinds
of
> dead people?

> K

 
 
 

Wines that will last for 10 years

Post by Gora » Fri, 29 Jun 2001 12:33:19




Quote:
> I want to make some wine that I can age for up to 10 years and will have
> a shelf life of another 2 or 3 years after that.

> What must I do to make a wine so it will be for the long term?

> My thoughts are:

>     just a little more tartness (which also gives us a lower pH)
>     less harsh tannins (from seeds, stems and skins)
>     more soft tannins (from French oak barrels)
>     more concentration of flavors (saigner, extended cold soak, and
> plenty of barrel aging)

The one essential item is concentration of flavor. If the wine is a little
thin on flavor, or even just average, it will be dead or on the decline
after 10 years. So it really starts with the grapes, and it's only when you
can taste them, or taste the must, that you can decide what style of wine
you should do. Of course a saigne will help a little for tannin extraction,
but you can concentrate the flavor by freezing part of the must to remove
some water, or by adding good quality grape concentrate. In both cases, the
limit will be the Brix degree and titrable acidity. Each year, my grapes
travel a long way from California to get here, and I never really know in
advance what they will be like. It is only after crushing that I can decide
what winemaking technique I will use, so I keep all options open.

Gorak