What temperature kills yeast?

What temperature kills yeast?

Post by sean » Fri, 17 May 1996 04:00:00



I was wondering what temperature is needed to kill off yeast after
fermentation.   This sounds like a weird idea but its just an idea for
now.  What I want to do is to prevent it from fermenting in the bottles
but I want to avoid using sulfites.  Any comments?  L8R...Sean

 
 
 

What temperature kills yeast?

Post by Maison de Chevalie » Fri, 17 May 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> I was wondering what temperature is needed to kill off yeast after
> fermentation.   This sounds like a weird idea but its just an idea for
> now.  What I want to do is to prevent it from fermenting in the bottles
> but I want to avoid using sulfites.  Any comments?  L8R...Sean

You can make wine "organically" wihtout cooling or heating the wine to
control the yeast.  To eliminate sulfites used to control bacteria,
simply pour boiling water over the fruit/herb/whatever to kill the
bacteria (let me know if you want details on how to do this without
sacrificing flavor - which you will no doubtly get as an argument for
using sulfites).  As far as controlling the yeast, by using the right
yeast for the wine, proper racking procedures, and proper stabilization,
you do not need to expose the wine to extreme temperatures.

If you are interested in trying this, post and I will reply...

Edward Chevalier
Maison de Chevalier

 
 
 

What temperature kills yeast?

Post by Kevin Ry » Sat, 18 May 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>I was wondering what temperature is needed to kill off yeast after
>fermentation.   This sounds like a weird idea but its just an idea for
>now.  What I want to do is to prevent it from fermenting in the bottles
>but I want to avoid using sulfites.  Any comments?  L8R...Sean

If it is the same as beer, then about 6-10 PU's will kill the yeast.

a PU = Pasteurisation Unit is the equivalent of 1 minute at 60 deg C.
The scale is logartithmic and the effect is an order of magnitude
every 7 deg C so that 10PUs is 1 minute at 67 deg C.  These numbers
are from memory but close enough.  One of the main problems is not to
get reinfected after pasteurisation.

Another method of removing the yeast is to filter very fine (about 1
micron) - but this also removes some other flavour compounds.

Kevin Ryan

 
 
 

What temperature kills yeast?

Post by Chickengrr » Sat, 18 May 1996 04:00:00


Pasteurization depends on time and temperature.  Some of the large cider
producers do it in a flash at near boiling temps, and then immediately
cooled.  I read somewhere that a .5 hours at 145F works as well as 5 min
at 165F.   I don't have a photographic memory, so you may want to check
the library yourself.  Some cookbooks have this info too, if the have
sections for jam or juices.
BrewWard

 
 
 

What temperature kills yeast?

Post by sean » Sun, 19 May 1996 04:00:00


Hmm, from what you guys/gals have said it seems like a temp of 145
degrees F for about 30 minutes should kill it off.  I'm just wondering
because I'm going to try an experiment to make a sweet mead with
champaign yeast.  The idea is to ferment 12lbs of honey in a total
volume of 2.5 gallons.  When it is done fermenting I'll pour in 2.5
gallons of hot water.  It sounds strange but its just an idea I want to
try out.  I do know that the *** level won't be as high but I like a
sweet mead with an *** content around 8%.  L8R...Sean

 
 
 

What temperature kills yeast?

Post by mshapi » Mon, 20 May 1996 04:00:00


: I was wondering what temperature is needed to kill off yeast after
: fermentation.   This sounds like a weird idea but its just an idea for
: now.  What I want to do is to prevent it from fermenting in the bottles
: but I want to avoid using sulfites.  Any comments?  L8R...Sean

The June '95 issue of _Inside_Mead_ has an article:

_Chemical_Analysis_of_Honey_Wines_-_Part 2_

by Roger Morse & Keith Steinkraus at Cornell University.

They did a lot of analysis on the evects of yeast nutrients and
methodology on fermentation speed and completeness.  They then list a
step by step procedure for making "a dry, light, almost colorless mead,
devoid of harsh or bitter plavor, and with good stability in the
bottle."  The last step in this procedure was to pasturize at 63 C (145
F) for 5 minutes.

This is pretty much in line  with the reponse detailing Pasturization
Units.  (5 minutes sounds a lot better to me than 30 minutes at 145 F - I
would be afraid of losing *** to evaporation if holding the temp for
that long.)

I haven't tried this method myself, yet, but I am thinking of running a
few experiments along these lines as soon as I have the space and time to
do so.  (Some time in the next few years I hope to open my own meadery
and I wouold also like to avoid the use of sulfites.)

Check out my WEB page and tell me what you think.

Wassail!

--

                                The Meadery:
                                http://www.FoundCollection.com/~mshapiro/index.html

THL Alexander Mareschal         Canton of Kappelenburg
                                Barony of Windmasters Hill
                                Kingdom of Atlantia
_____________________________________________________________________________
No poem was ever written by a drinker of water. - Horace (63 BCE - 8 BCE)  
  In Wine there is truth. - Pliny the Elder (23 CE - 79 CE)
    Good wine praises itself. - Arab proverb
      Water separates the people of the world, wine unites them. - Anonymous

 
 
 

What temperature kills yeast?

Post by GREATFE » Thu, 23 May 1996 04:00:00


45 degrees C, 113 degrees F.

You don't need to go all the way to Pasteurization just to kill yeast.

Greatferm

 
 
 

What temperature kills yeast?

Post by Chickengrr » Thu, 23 May 1996 04:00:00


But we want to make sure we kill nasties too.  Don't they require a bit
higher temps?  I know if they form spores, you can forget it!
BrewWard


Quote:
> 45 degrees C, 113 degrees F.

> You don't need to go all the way to Pasteurization just to kill yeast.

> Greatferm

 
 
 

What temperature kills yeast?

Post by GREATFE » Thu, 23 May 1996 04:00:00


Pasteurization goes far beyond the temperatures necessary to kill yeast.

Yeast begin to die at about 45 degrees C, 113 degrees F.  I think if you
reach 120 F,you could cool immediately and all the yeast would be dead.

If you want to go beyond that, and also kill all the bacteria, then the
answers about Pasteurization, already posted, would apply.

Greatferm