Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Post by Dany P. Ghozal » Mon, 26 Nov 2001 05:27:00



I seem to recall seeing a post about that. Just out of curiosity, why is
that a big no-no?

D.

--
Dany P. Ghozali
Dept. of Geological Sciences
University of Canterbury
Private Bag 4800
Christchurch 8020
New Zealand
Tel: +64 3 364 2987 ext. 7301
Fax: +64 3 364 2769

 
 
 

Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Post by Andrew Werb » Mon, 26 Nov 2001 06:13:22




Quote:
> I seem to recall seeing a post about that. Just out of curiosity, why is
> that a big no-no?

> D.

> --
> Dany P. Ghozali
> Dept. of Geological Sciences
> University of Canterbury
> Private Bag 4800
> Christchurch 8020
> New Zealand
> Tel: +64 3 364 2987 ext. 7301
> Fax: +64 3 364 2769


[The worst effect I noticed when I tried this was a lot of the solution
being squeezed out of the corks, and into the works of the corker, which is
made of steel. The rusty liquid that then dripped into the wine was rather
unappealing- and iron ions are the last things you want in there (it
destroys the wine, and creates a *** taste as well). If you are nervous
about cork sterility, use only fresh corks in a sealed bag, which have
usually been treated with SO2 gas or ozone. If your corks have been lying
around a while, see if it's possible to get them re-gassed by the supplier.]

Andrew Werby
http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Post by tallgobli » Mon, 26 Nov 2001 08:51:59


Well I buy corks in bags of 100. The guy at my local wine supply shop bags
them himself from his megasack of thousands. My feeling is that he doesnt
wear plastic gloves for this operation and since he could have anything from
chicken pox to malaria I think I'm gonna continue to give my corks a soak in
mild sulphite. If a bit of the sulphite squeezes out ino the wine its not
gonna be noticible. I rinse my corker when i'm finished with it so rust
hasnt been a problem for me and well I feel better with the extra
sanitation.

Quote:


message

> > I seem to recall seeing a post about that. Just out of curiosity, why is
> > that a big no-no?

> > D.

> > --
> > Dany P. Ghozali
> > Dept. of Geological Sciences
> > University of Canterbury
> > Private Bag 4800
> > Christchurch 8020
> > New Zealand
> > Tel: +64 3 364 2987 ext. 7301
> > Fax: +64 3 364 2769

> [The worst effect I noticed when I tried this was a lot of the solution
> being squeezed out of the corks, and into the works of the corker, which
is
> made of steel. The rusty liquid that then dripped into the wine was rather
> unappealing- and iron ions are the last things you want in there (it
> destroys the wine, and creates a *** taste as well). If you are nervous
> about cork sterility, use only fresh corks in a sealed bag, which have
> usually been treated with SO2 gas or ozone. If your corks have been lying
> around a while, see if it's possible to get them re-gassed by the
supplier.]

> Andrew Werby
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Post by J Reite » Mon, 26 Nov 2001 09:00:29


when I am bottling, after compacting the cork in the corker, I always dab
the underside of the cork with a paper towel to remove that drip of sulphite
solution from the bottom of the cork brfore it goes into the bottle.
Joanne


Quote:
> Well I buy corks in bags of 100. The guy at my local wine supply shop bags
> them himself from his megasack of thousands. My feeling is that he doesnt
> wear plastic gloves for this operation and since he could have anything
from
> chicken pox to malaria I think I'm gonna continue to give my corks a soak
in
> mild sulphite. If a bit of the sulphite squeezes out ino the wine its not
> gonna be noticible. I rinse my corker when i'm finished with it so rust
> hasnt been a problem for me and well I feel better with the extra
> sanitation.



> message

> > > I seem to recall seeing a post about that. Just out of curiosity, why
is
> > > that a big no-no?

> > > D.

> > > --
> > > Dany P. Ghozali
> > > Dept. of Geological Sciences
> > > University of Canterbury
> > > Private Bag 4800
> > > Christchurch 8020
> > > New Zealand
> > > Tel: +64 3 364 2987 ext. 7301
> > > Fax: +64 3 364 2769

> > [The worst effect I noticed when I tried this was a lot of the solution
> > being squeezed out of the corks, and into the works of the corker, which
> is
> > made of steel. The rusty liquid that then dripped into the wine was
rather
> > unappealing- and iron ions are the last things you want in there (it
> > destroys the wine, and creates a *** taste as well). If you are
nervous
> > about cork sterility, use only fresh corks in a sealed bag, which have
> > usually been treated with SO2 gas or ozone. If your corks have been
lying
> > around a while, see if it's possible to get them re-gassed by the
> supplier.]

> > Andrew Werby
> > http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Post by Tom » Mon, 26 Nov 2001 10:31:21



Quote:
> when I am bottling, after compacting the cork in the corker, I always dab
> the underside of the cork with a paper towel to remove that drip of
sulphite
> solution from the bottom of the cork brfore it goes into the bottle.

My corker doesn't allow for that to occur.  The bottle has to be in place
before you bring down the handle, because the bottle platform locks when you
swing the handle and before the cork gets compressed.

Anyway, I think you folks are being too anal-retentive about cork sterility.
No pathogens grow in wine, and you _do_ use sulfite in your wines anyway,
right?  A simple warm water rinse is sufficient, and even that might be
overkill.

Tom S

 
 
 

Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Post by W. L. Eisenma » Mon, 26 Nov 2001 11:02:32



Quote:

>snip.....
> Anyway, I think you folks are being too anal-retentive about cork
sterility.
> No pathogens grow in wine, and you _do_ use sulfite in your wines anyway,
> right?  A simple warm water rinse is sufficient, and even that might be
> overkill.

> Tom S

I'm with Tom on this issue.
There isn't much growing on corks that can survive in wine, and nothing
growing in wine can hurt you.
Regards,
lum
 
 
 

Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Post by Bill Bake » Mon, 26 Nov 2001 13:03:59


Doesn't the gas vapor from sufphite do the dirty work?
I mean all that your need to do is put them in a large zip lock bag with just a
little S02 right?
Soaking isn't really necessary is it.
Just the smell of S02 drives me out of the room.
Bill
Quote:

> Well I buy corks in bags of 100. The guy at my local wine supply shop bags
> them himself from his megasack of thousands. My feeling is that he doesnt
> wear plastic gloves for this operation and since he could have anything from
> chicken pox to malaria I think I'm gonna continue to give my corks a soak in
> mild sulphite. If a bit of the sulphite squeezes out ino the wine its not
> gonna be noticible. I rinse my corker when i'm finished with it so rust
> hasnt been a problem for me and well I feel better with the extra
> sanitation.



> message

> > > I seem to recall seeing a post about that. Just out of curiosity, why is
> > > that a big no-no?

> > > D.

> > > --
> > > Dany P. Ghozali
> > > Dept. of Geological Sciences
> > > University of Canterbury
> > > Private Bag 4800
> > > Christchurch 8020
> > > New Zealand
> > > Tel: +64 3 364 2987 ext. 7301
> > > Fax: +64 3 364 2769

> > [The worst effect I noticed when I tried this was a lot of the solution
> > being squeezed out of the corks, and into the works of the corker, which
> is
> > made of steel. The rusty liquid that then dripped into the wine was rather
> > unappealing- and iron ions are the last things you want in there (it
> > destroys the wine, and creates a *** taste as well). If you are nervous
> > about cork sterility, use only fresh corks in a sealed bag, which have
> > usually been treated with SO2 gas or ozone. If your corks have been lying
> > around a while, see if it's possible to get them re-gassed by the
> supplier.]

> > Andrew Werby
> > http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Post by Dany P. Ghozal » Mon, 26 Nov 2001 13:06:14




Quote:



> >snip.....
> > Anyway, I think you folks are being too anal-retentive about cork
> sterility.
> > No pathogens grow in wine, and you _do_ use sulfite in your wines
anyway,
> > right?  A simple warm water rinse is sufficient, and even that might be
> > overkill.

> > Tom S

> I'm with Tom on this issue.
> There isn't much growing on corks that can survive in wine, and nothing
> growing in wine can hurt you.

I wasn't thinking of something hurting myself - more of something hurting
the wine :o)

So far I haven't seen a strong reason NOT to soak. Unless someone can come
up with it I'll keep entertaining my paranoia. I've always thought a little
sulphite wouldn't hurt the wine too much. Since I use an el-cheapo plastic
hand-corker I won't have the worry of damage to my corker to think about.
It's hard work using a hand corker but works just fine for me.

Cheers everyone,
D.

--
Dany P. Ghozali
Dept. of Geological Sciences
University of Canterbury
Private Bag 4800
Christchurch 8020
New Zealand
Tel: +64 3 364 2987 ext. 7301
Fax: +64 3 364 2769

 
 
 

Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Post by Tom » Mon, 26 Nov 2001 16:05:16



Quote:
> Doesn't the gas vapor from sufphite do the dirty work?
> I mean all that your need to do is put them in a large zip lock bag with
just a
> little S02 right?
> Soaking isn't really necessary is it.
> Just the smell of S02 drives me out of the room.

SO2 is not effective as a bacterial inhibitor unless there is moisture
present.  Cork holds a certain amount of water, even when it appears to be
dry, so gassing a bagful of corks _should_ work - but how do you propose to
do that?

BTW, the reason SO2 is so obnoxious to be around is that it dissolves
readily in the water in your mucous membranes and lungs, forming sulfurous
acid - a reasonably active reducing agent.

Tom S

 
 
 

Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Post by Edwin Pawlowsk » Mon, 26 Nov 2001 22:55:14



Quote:
> Since I use an el-cheapo plastic
> hand-corker I won't have the worry of damage to my corker to think about.
> It's hard work using a hand corker but works just fine for me.

> Cheers everyone,
> D.

With that corker you probably HAVE to soak the corks to get them into the
bottle.  Fresh corks go in easily with any corker, but once they are dried
out a bit, the small corkers are much more difficult.

I've done both way and in cases that I soaked, I had some small seepage that
never showed up in dry corks.  I'm using synthetics right now and they seem
to work even better.
Ed

http://pages.cthome.net/edhome

 
 
 

Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Post by Greg Coo » Mon, 26 Nov 2001 22:42:09


On 11/25/01 1:05 AM, in article

Quote:



>> Doesn't the gas vapor from sufphite do the dirty work?
>> I mean all that your need to do is put them in a large zip lock bag with
> just a
>> little S02 right?
>> Soaking isn't really necessary is it.
>> Just the smell of S02 drives me out of the room.

> SO2 is not effective as a bacterial inhibitor unless there is moisture
> present.  Cork holds a certain amount of water, even when it appears to be
> dry, so gassing a bagful of corks _should_ work - but how do you propose to
> do that?

> BTW, the reason SO2 is so obnoxious to be around is that it dissolves
> readily in the water in your mucous membranes and lungs, forming sulfurous
> acid - a reasonably active reducing agent.

I put my corks into a pail with a tight fitting lid along with a glass
containing a strong sulfite solution.  The SO2 permeates the atmosphere
inside the bucket.  It works well.  I haven't done this lately as I just
insert them out of the bag.  Never had a problem with spoilage in my 1+
years of winemaking!  :)

----Greg

http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/instruct/grcook/wine/

 
 
 

Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Post by news.houston.sbcglobal.ne » Tue, 27 Nov 2001 07:54:00


What about boiling or steaming the corks for 5 min.  I have seen that
recommended and have not had any trouble with it when I did it.

Ray



Quote:
> I seem to recall seeing a post about that. Just out of curiosity, why is
> that a big no-no?

> D.

> --
> Dany P. Ghozali
> Dept. of Geological Sciences
> University of Canterbury
> Private Bag 4800
> Christchurch 8020
> New Zealand
> Tel: +64 3 364 2987 ext. 7301
> Fax: +64 3 364 2769


 
 
 

Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Post by Dewey & Lucy Thompso » Tue, 27 Nov 2001 12:15:26


Dany:

The problem doesn't show up for a couple of years.  The corks are "weak",
and the corkscrews tend to pull out.  You are MUCH better off corking dry,
or dab a bit of liquid onto the cork.  Of course, if all you have is a hand
corker, you are pretty much stuck.

I fought with corks for years until I finally got smart and went out and
bought a floor corker.  If you make more than about three gallons a year,
the floor corker is a good investment.

Dewey

Dewey


Quote:
> What about boiling or steaming the corks for 5 min.  I have seen that
> recommended and have not had any trouble with it when I did it.

> Ray



> > I seem to recall seeing a post about that. Just out of curiosity, why is
> > that a big no-no?

> > D.

> > --
> > Dany P. Ghozali
> > Dept. of Geological Sciences
> > University of Canterbury
> > Private Bag 4800
> > Christchurch 8020
> > New Zealand
> > Tel: +64 3 364 2987 ext. 7301
> > Fax: +64 3 364 2769


 
 
 

Soaking corks in sulphite solution?

Post by Tom » Tue, 27 Nov 2001 13:01:51



Quote:
> What about boiling or steaming the corks for 5 min.  I have seen that
> recommended and have not had any trouble with it when I did it.

I would recommend against boiling, but steaming should be OK.

I still think that's going too far, however.  I repeat:  warm water rinse,
until the water is clear.  I've been doing this for almost 20 years, without
corkage problems.  (Jeez, I hate it when I have to drag out my credentials!
:-/   )

Tom S