Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by Charles » Thu, 19 Oct 2006 13:29:58



Other than minor acid reduction, are there any significant benefits to
cold stabilizing red wines? I'm working with several low pH / low acid
red wines this season. I might have to add tartaric acid later if I
cold stabilize. Is it worth it???

Thanks,
Charles Erwin

 
 
 

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by Doug » Fri, 20 Oct 2006 07:21:33


As far as I've ever heard, the point is mostly to avoid having tartaric
acid precipitate out after the wine has been bottled.  This is
generally considered more of a cosmetic issue, as the tartaric acid
crystals are really not harmful, and don't have any bad effects on the
wine.  Less often, it can be used to reduce the amount of acidity,
although I believe this only works with grape wines, since their acids
are pre***ly tartaric.  Fruit wines tend to have mostly malic and
citric acids, and those are more soluble (as I recall).

If you have low acidity, cold stabilizing may not precipitate any
tartaric.  If you feel pretty sure you are going to add some
afterwards, I can't think of any reason to bother with cold
stabilization.

Doug

 
 
 

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by Charles » Fri, 20 Oct 2006 12:31:33


That's exactly what I was thinking Doug. Thanks so much for your
comments...


Quote:
>As far as I've ever heard, the point is mostly to avoid having tartaric
>acid precipitate out after the wine has been bottled.  This is
>generally considered more of a cosmetic issue, as the tartaric acid
>crystals are really not harmful, and don't have any bad effects on the
>wine.  Less often, it can be used to reduce the amount of acidity,
>although I believe this only works with grape wines, since their acids
>are pre***ly tartaric.  Fruit wines tend to have mostly malic and
>citric acids, and those are more soluble (as I recall).

>If you have low acidity, cold stabilizing may not precipitate any
>tartaric.  If you feel pretty sure you are going to add some
>afterwards, I can't think of any reason to bother with cold
>stabilization.

>Doug

 
 
 

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by Jake Spee » Sat, 21 Oct 2006 21:18:58


It should help with clearing the wine.  I typically add a fining agent
before cold stabilization.  The cold temperatures supposedly help
precipitate fine sediment along with acid crystals.  The fining agent
just helps things along.

Bryan



Quote:
>Other than minor acid reduction, are there any significant benefits to
>cold stabilizing red wines? I'm working with several low pH / low acid
>red wines this season. I might have to add tartaric acid later if I
>cold stabilize. Is it worth it???

>Thanks,
>Charles Erwin

 
 
 

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by Ric » Sun, 22 Oct 2006 02:45:38


You might have that slightly backwards. The cold can presumably help the
fining agent precipitate. Not the other way around. The fining agent is a
positive or negatively charged particle, attracting an opposite charged
particle (such as a protein causing haziness, or suspended solids). The cold
stabilization is a tactic for precipitating tartrates.

If the OP writer has a cloudy red wine, he might want to consider egg white
fining. If he added tartaric, then cold stabilization might be appropriate.
IMHO, time is the best agent for clarifying red wines. Aging in bulk. If you
have added tartaric acid back at the beginning of fermentation, there is a
greater likelihood of tartrate crystals - and cold stabilizing will help get
those out before bottling. otherwise, seems pointless to me. I almost always
use bentonite and cold stabilization with white wines. Never used anyhting
other than time for reds - except once when I used egg whites just cause I
wanted to try it!

Quote:
> It should help with clearing the wine.  I typically add a fining agent
> before cold stabilization.  The cold temperatures supposedly help
> precipitate fine sediment along with acid crystals.  The fining agent
> just helps things along.

> Bryan



>>Other than minor acid reduction, are there any significant benefits to
>>cold stabilizing red wines? I'm working with several low pH / low acid
>>red wines this season. I might have to add tartaric acid later if I
>>cold stabilize. Is it worth it???

>>Thanks,
>>Charles Erwin

 
 
 

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by Charles » Thu, 26 Oct 2006 12:47:13


Good info Bryan. I'm more worried about precipitating out much needed
acid than aesthetic issues associated with tartrate crystals. I'm
dealing with low acid wines that were acid-adjusted prior to
fermentation. If I cold stabilize and then end up having to add more
tartaric afterwards to get the acid back up, I suppose I've defeated
the purpose of cold stabilization.

I'm I right??

Quote:

>You might have that slightly backwards. The cold can presumably help the
>fining agent precipitate. Not the other way around. The fining agent is a
>positive or negatively charged particle, attracting an opposite charged
>particle (such as a protein causing haziness, or suspended solids). The cold
>stabilization is a tactic for precipitating tartrates.

>If the OP writer has a cloudy red wine, he might want to consider egg white
>fining. If he added tartaric, then cold stabilization might be appropriate.
>IMHO, time is the best agent for clarifying red wines. Aging in bulk. If you
>have added tartaric acid back at the beginning of fermentation, there is a
>greater likelihood of tartrate crystals - and cold stabilizing will help get
>those out before bottling. otherwise, seems pointless to me. I almost always
>use bentonite and cold stabilization with white wines. Never used anyhting
>other than time for reds - except once when I used egg whites just cause I
>wanted to try it!

>> It should help with clearing the wine.  I typically add a fining agent
>> before cold stabilization.  The cold temperatures supposedly help
>> precipitate fine sediment along with acid crystals.  The fining agent
>> just helps things along.

>> Bryan



>>>Other than minor acid reduction, are there any significant benefits to
>>>cold stabilizing red wines? I'm working with several low pH / low acid
>>>red wines this season. I might have to add tartaric acid later if I
>>>cold stabilize. Is it worth it???

>>>Thanks,
>>>Charles Erwin

 
 
 

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by Joe Sallusti » Fri, 27 Oct 2006 06:11:38


. I'm more worried about precipitating out much needed

Quote:
> acid than aesthetic issues associated with tartrate crystals. I'm
> dealing with low acid wines that were acid-adjusted prior to
> fermentation. If I cold stabilize and then end up having to add more
> tartaric afterwards to get the acid back up, I suppose I've defeated
> the purpose of cold stabilization.

Not exactly; those tartrate crystals will still form over time at
cellar temperatures in my experience so you are going to lose the
acidity no matter what.  If you have low acid and low pH it sound like
you have more tartaric than malic so it certainly won't hurt to cold
stabilize from the pH perspective (depending on what you mean by low
acid).  If the TA were 5.0 on a red, I would do nothing but let it sit
if it tasted balanced.  If it were less than that and my pH was not
above 3.6 I might use citric acid over tartaric.  That might be another
option open to you.  Use a different acid.

Joe  

 
 
 

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by pp » Fri, 27 Oct 2006 07:30:52



Quote:
> Not exactly; those tartrate crystals will still form over time at
> cellar temperatures in my experience so you are going to lose the
> acidity no matter what.  If you have low acid and low pH it sound like
> you have more tartaric than malic so it certainly won't hurt to cold
> stabilize from the pH perspective (depending on what you mean by low
> acid).  If the TA were 5.0 on a red, I would do nothing but let it sit
> if it tasted balanced.  If it were less than that and my pH was not
> above 3.6 I might use citric acid over tartaric.  That might be another
> option open to you.  Use a different acid.

> Joe  

I think citric acid might cause problems in wines that went through ML
- or is it only when they are going through ML? In any case, if the pH
is low, there is not much potassium in the wine, so there might not be
any tartrate precipitation to speak of. It's really not a big deal on
reds anyway, I wouldn't do the second cold stabilization if the acid
needed correction after the first one.

The one good reason for cold stabilization on reds I can think of is
when the acid was adjusted to high levels to lower down the pH. In that
case the acid reduction is usually quite significant, so cold
stabilization is often needed to make the wine balanced. Again, that's
not the case here, just answering the more general question on
potential benefits of CS.

Pp

 
 
 

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by Jake Spee » Fri, 27 Oct 2006 11:38:07


My understanding is that cold stabilization precipitates out excess
acid.  It's that same excess acid that results in crystals.  If your
wine is low in acid I don't expect anything will precipitate.

My cold stabilization experience comes from making white wines from
Finger Lakes, NY grapes, which are typically high in acid.  Cold
stabilization reduced acid to acceptable levels.  In no case did it
reduce the levels below anything desired.

Please note that this is anecdotal evidence; it's hardly scientific.
Hopefully someone who's done (or read) the reseach can chime in.

Bryan



Quote:
>Good info Bryan. I'm more worried about precipitating out much needed
>acid than aesthetic issues associated with tartrate crystals. I'm
>dealing with low acid wines that were acid-adjusted prior to
>fermentation. If I cold stabilize and then end up having to add more
>tartaric afterwards to get the acid back up, I suppose I've defeated
>the purpose of cold stabilization.

>I'm I right??


>>You might have that slightly backwards. The cold can presumably help the
>>fining agent precipitate. Not the other way around. The fining agent is a
>>positive or negatively charged particle, attracting an opposite charged
>>particle (such as a protein causing haziness, or suspended solids). The cold
>>stabilization is a tactic for precipitating tartrates.

>>If the OP writer has a cloudy red wine, he might want to consider egg white
>>fining. If he added tartaric, then cold stabilization might be appropriate.
>>IMHO, time is the best agent for clarifying red wines. Aging in bulk. If you
>>have added tartaric acid back at the beginning of fermentation, there is a
>>greater likelihood of tartrate crystals - and cold stabilizing will help get
>>those out before bottling. otherwise, seems pointless to me. I almost always
>>use bentonite and cold stabilization with white wines. Never used anyhting
>>other than time for reds - except once when I used egg whites just cause I
>>wanted to try it!

>>> It should help with clearing the wine.  I typically add a fining agent
>>> before cold stabilization.  The cold temperatures supposedly help
>>> precipitate fine sediment along with acid crystals.  The fining agent
>>> just helps things along.

>>> Bryan



>>>>Other than minor acid reduction, are there any significant benefits to
>>>>cold stabilizing red wines? I'm working with several low pH / low acid
>>>>red wines this season. I might have to add tartaric acid later if I
>>>>cold stabilize. Is it worth it???

>>>>Thanks,
>>>>Charles Erwin

 
 
 

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by Charles » Mon, 30 Oct 2006 13:05:05


How do you know if a low pH and/or low acid wine is low in malic
instead of tartaric without conducting a paper chromatography test?

My pre-fermentation, post-adjusted pH was nearly ideal at .65 with a
pH of about 3.3. It was .50 with pH of 3.7 before adjustment with
tartaric acid. I expect acid to be between .55-.60 after ML which is
right where I want it. I fear cold stabilization could take me out of
the desired range.


Quote:


>> Not exactly; those tartrate crystals will still form over time at
>> cellar temperatures in my experience so you are going to lose the
>> acidity no matter what.  If you have low acid and low pH it sound like
>> you have more tartaric than malic so it certainly won't hurt to cold
>> stabilize from the pH perspective (depending on what you mean by low
>> acid).  If the TA were 5.0 on a red, I would do nothing but let it sit
>> if it tasted balanced.  If it were less than that and my pH was not
>> above 3.6 I might use citric acid over tartaric.  That might be another
>> option open to you.  Use a different acid.

>> Joe  

>I think citric acid might cause problems in wines that went through ML
>- or is it only when they are going through ML? In any case, if the pH
>is low, there is not much potassium in the wine, so there might not be
>any tartrate precipitation to speak of. It's really not a big deal on
>reds anyway, I wouldn't do the second cold stabilization if the acid
>needed correction after the first one.

>The one good reason for cold stabilization on reds I can think of is
>when the acid was adjusted to high levels to lower down the pH. In that
>case the acid reduction is usually quite significant, so cold
>stabilization is often needed to make the wine balanced. Again, that's
>not the case here, just answering the more general question on
>potential benefits of CS.

>Pp

 
 
 

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by William Frazie » Mon, 30 Oct 2006 23:55:35


Charles E "How do you know if a low pH and/or low acid wine is low in malic

Quote:
> instead of tartaric without conducting a paper chromatography test?"

Paper chromatography won't tell you how much malic or tartaric is in your
wine...it will just tell you if either acid is in the wine.  I guess you
could make a guess by the size of the spots compared to each other but it's
really a yes or no type test.
" My pre-fermentation, post-adjusted pH was nearly ideal at .65 with a

Quote:
> pH of about 3.3. It was .50 with pH of 3.7 before adjustment with
> tartaric acid. I expect acid to be between .55-.60 after ML which is
> right where I want it. I fear cold stabilization could take me out of
> the desired range."

That 0.55 to 0.60%TA is a nice target for a red wine.  Why don't you wait
until ML is finished, test (be sure to get the CO2 out of your sample) and
then decide.  There's no hurry.  If you're still concerned put a bottle of
the wine in the frig (I like to cold condition at 32F) for a week and test.
Then you will know what to expect with the bulk wine.   I've done reds with
and without cold conditioning...at worst you will get some tartrate crystals
in your bottles but they don't affect taste.

Bill Frzaier
Olathe, Kansas USA

 
 
 

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by pp » Wed, 01 Nov 2006 02:35:33



Quote:
> How do you know if a low pH and/or low acid wine is low in malic
> instead of tartaric without conducting a paper chromatography test?

It's a rule of thumb - as grapes ripen, the TA goes down and pH goes
up. The change in TA is due to a loss of malic acid while the tartaric
acid stays stable. So riper grapes will have a lower ratio of
malic:tartaric acid. In your case of starting values of 5g/L TA (low
acid) and 3.7pH (relatively high pH), my guess is there should not be
much malic acid - I would definitely not expect the pH to go up by 0.25
as was the avg rise reported by Bill.

It's really a guesswork no matter how you look at it. Personally, I
prefer to err on the lower side of additions rather that add too much
and then having to correct the other way later. Bill's advice is good -
do a cold stabilization test on a sample and that will telly you what
if any adjustments need to be made.

Pp

Quote:
> My pre-fermentation, post-adjusted pH was nearly ideal at .65 with a
> pH of about 3.3. It was .50 with pH of 3.7 before adjustment with
> tartaric acid. I expect acid to be between .55-.60 after ML which is
> right where I want it. I fear cold stabilization could take me out of
> the desired range.

 
 
 

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by Davi » Wed, 01 Nov 2006 03:02:08


Hi Charles,

Quote:
> How do you know if a low pH and/or low acid wine is low in malic
> instead of tartaric without conducting a paper chromatography test?

AccuVin produces some really easy-to-use testers for specific acid
levels in your wine. It's not scientifically accurate to a specific
mg/L amount, but they work great to tell you if you've attained a "safe
level" (e.g. no Malic) remaining.

http://www.accuvin.com/

Cheers,

David

 
 
 

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by Charles » Tue, 07 Nov 2006 13:30:17


This is good practical advice Bill. Sometimes the obvious eludes me.
I'll try a single bottle to see benefits (if any) before commiting the
entire lot. Thanks!
Quote:
>That 0.55 to 0.60%TA is a nice target for a red wine.  Why don't you wait
>until ML is finished, test (be sure to get the CO2 out of your sample) and
>then decide.  There's no hurry.  If you're still concerned put a bottle of
>the wine in the frig (I like to cold condition at 32F) for a week and test.
>Then you will know what to expect with the bulk wine.   I've done reds with
>and without cold conditioning...at worst you will get some tartrate crystals
>in your bottles but they don't affect taste.

>Bill Frzaier
>Olathe, Kansas USA

 
 
 

Benefits of Red Wine Cold Stabilization

Post by Charles » Tue, 07 Nov 2006 13:34:49


Unfortunately these are relatively expensive due to the minimum number
you must buy even if your just doing one test. I think I'll try Bill's
recommendation of a single bottle test. Thanks!


Quote:
>Hi Charles,

>> How do you know if a low pH and/or low acid wine is low in malic
>> instead of tartaric without conducting a paper chromatography test?

>AccuVin produces some really easy-to-use testers for specific acid
>levels in your wine. It's not scientifically accurate to a specific
>mg/L amount, but they work great to tell you if you've attained a "safe
>level" (e.g. no Malic) remaining.

>http://www.accuvin.com/

>Cheers,

>David