couple of fruit wine questions

couple of fruit wine questions

Post by pete ro » Sat, 03 May 2003 23:50:02



Hi, I've started making a few fruit wines.. a couple of questions.

Typically, I dump the fruit (cherries or whatever) into a mesh bag..
The bag of fruit tends to float on the top of the primary fermentor
with kind of an "iceberg" effect, leaving some fruit out of the
liquid.. Is the fruit typically wieghted down so the yeast can work on
all the fruit? (I do move the bag around during daily stirring to
circulate it a bit)..

Also, if you are using something like cherries or pineapple
"tidbits".. is it best to use as is, or should you put them through a
blender or something (to give the yeast more surface area to work
on/better extract juices)..

Thanks again for all the help.. This is one of the most friendly
newsgroups on the net.

 
 
 

couple of fruit wine questions

Post by Dar » Sun, 04 May 2003 02:44:13


Good description "iceberg" effect....  I keep my fruit in a mesh bag as
well, and when I stir the must I generally turn the bag over, swish it
around, and submerge it into the must.  I will cut fruit up for the mesh
bag, but I have not put the fruit through a blender.  Which doesn't mean it
can't be done, but all of the fruit looks pretty bad and mushy by the time
I'm done with the primary ferment, so I don't know that I would do it.  I
would be interested it what others have to say.
Darlene


Quote:
> Hi, I've started making a few fruit wines.. a couple of questions.

> Typically, I dump the fruit (cherries or whatever) into a mesh bag..
> The bag of fruit tends to float on the top of the primary fermentor
> with kind of an "iceberg" effect, leaving some fruit out of the
> liquid.. Is the fruit typically wieghted down so the yeast can work on
> all the fruit? (I do move the bag around during daily stirring to
> circulate it a bit)..

> Also, if you are using something like cherries or pineapple
> "tidbits".. is it best to use as is, or should you put them through a
> blender or something (to give the yeast more surface area to work
> on/better extract juices)..

> Thanks again for all the help.. This is one of the most friendly
> newsgroups on the net.


 
 
 

couple of fruit wine questions

Post by Guy » Sun, 04 May 2003 04:23:56


Quote:

> I've started making a few fruit wines.. a couple of questions.
> Typically, I dump the fruit (cherries or whatever) into a mesh bag.

The bag of fruit tends to float on the top of the primary fermentor
with kind of an "iceberg" effect, leaving some fruit out of the
liquid.. Is the fruit typically wieghted down so the yeast can work on
all the fruit? (I do move the bag around during daily stirring to
circulate it a bit)..
I include enough marbles in the mesh bag to submerge it.

Guy

 
 
 

couple of fruit wine questions

Post by cartercathe » Wed, 07 May 2003 07:09:33


ditto.  A handful of cleaned and sanitized marbles drags it to the bottom or
perhaps to the middle, but regardless, it is fully submerged.

Carter


Quote:

> > I've started making a few fruit wines.. a couple of questions.

> > Typically, I dump the fruit (cherries or whatever) into a mesh bag.
> The bag of fruit tends to float on the top of the primary fermentor
> with kind of an "iceberg" effect, leaving some fruit out of the
> liquid.. Is the fruit typically wieghted down so the yeast can work on
> all the fruit? (I do move the bag around during daily stirring to
> circulate it a bit)..

> I include enough marbles in the mesh bag to submerge it.

> Guy

 
 
 

couple of fruit wine questions

Post by PMyer » Wed, 07 May 2003 09:00:45



Quote:
> Good description "iceberg" effect....  I keep my fruit in a mesh bag as
> well, and when I stir the must I generally turn the bag over, swish it
> around, and submerge it into the must.  I will cut fruit up for the mesh
> bag, but I have not put the fruit through a blender.  Which doesn't mean
it
> can't be done, but all of the fruit looks pretty bad and mushy by the time
> I'm done with the primary ferment, so I don't know that I would do it.  I
> would be interested it what others have to say.
> Darlene

    I make relatively small batches (15L), and don't use a mesh bag in the
way the rest of you seem to. I simply let the fruit float in the must during
pulp fermentation. When it comes time to transfer off the fruit, I rack into
another fermenter with a mesh bag around the far end of the racking tube,
collecting any fruit particles that may come through the tap (I do my pulp
fermentations in HDPE 15 litre "barrels"). When the bulk of the must has
been strained from the fruit, I then empty the remaining contents of the
primary fermenter into the mesh bag, now positioned over the funnel leading
to the glass secondary. When all the remaining fruit is in the mesh bag, I
give it a light squeeze to get as much juice out of the fruit as possible.
It's a little primitive, but I have been doing it for quite a while now with
no problems. Everything, including my hands, is naturally sterilised
thoroughly before the transfer process.
    BTW, I am investing in a small fruit press within the next two months or
so, in an effort to remove the manual hand pressing method. I will still
allow the fruit to free-float during fermentation though.

Cheers,
Pete

 
 
 

couple of fruit wine questions

Post by KENT MC LELLA » Wed, 07 May 2003 11:46:33


I very rarely use a mesh bag. I usually just throw everything in & stir at
least once a day. When the fermentation begins to slow I use a fine mesh
strainer to "scoop" the floating fruit/pulp into a mesh bag. I then squeeze
the pulp to get any juice out of it, return the juice to the primary. I then
let it set for a day to settle out before racking. I put a fine mesh
strainer into my funnel & rack.

Dr. Mac
--


Quote:


> > Good description "iceberg" effect....  I keep my fruit in a mesh bag as
> > well, and when I stir the must I generally turn the bag over, swish it
> > around, and submerge it into the must.  I will cut fruit up for the mesh
> > bag, but I have not put the fruit through a blender.  Which doesn't mean
> it
> > can't be done, but all of the fruit looks pretty bad and mushy by the
time
> > I'm done with the primary ferment, so I don't know that I would do it.
I
> > would be interested it what others have to say.
> > Darlene

>     I make relatively small batches (15L), and don't use a mesh bag in the
> way the rest of you seem to. I simply let the fruit float in the must
during
> pulp fermentation. When it comes time to transfer off the fruit, I rack
into
> another fermenter with a mesh bag around the far end of the racking tube,
> collecting any fruit particles that may come through the tap (I do my pulp
> fermentations in HDPE 15 litre "barrels"). When the bulk of the must has
> been strained from the fruit, I then empty the remaining contents of the
> primary fermenter into the mesh bag, now positioned over the funnel
leading
> to the glass secondary. When all the remaining fruit is in the mesh bag, I
> give it a light squeeze to get as much juice out of the fruit as possible.
> It's a little primitive, but I have been doing it for quite a while now
with
> no problems. Everything, including my hands, is naturally sterilised
> thoroughly before the transfer process.
>     BTW, I am investing in a small fruit press within the next two months
or
> so, in an effort to remove the manual hand pressing method. I will still
> allow the fruit to free-float during fermentation though.

> Cheers,
> Pete

 
 
 

couple of fruit wine questions

Post by gsmit.. » Wed, 07 May 2003 12:51:24


Have you considered building a press?  I have a book called Woodwork
for Winemakers.  It has plans for several presses.  The book cost
about $12 which is a ton cheaper than the press itself.  Might want to
take a look at your local wine supply store and see if  the presses
would suit your needs.  

Greg

Quote:



>> Good description "iceberg" effect....  I keep my fruit in a mesh bag as
>> well, and when I stir the must I generally turn the bag over, swish it
>> around, and submerge it into the must.  I will cut fruit up for the mesh
>> bag, but I have not put the fruit through a blender.  Which doesn't mean
>it
>> can't be done, but all of the fruit looks pretty bad and mushy by the time
>> I'm done with the primary ferment, so I don't know that I would do it.  I
>> would be interested it what others have to say.
>> Darlene

>    I make relatively small batches (15L), and don't use a mesh bag in the
>way the rest of you seem to. I simply let the fruit float in the must during
>pulp fermentation. When it comes time to transfer off the fruit, I rack into
>another fermenter with a mesh bag around the far end of the racking tube,
>collecting any fruit particles that may come through the tap (I do my pulp
>fermentations in HDPE 15 litre "barrels"). When the bulk of the must has
>been strained from the fruit, I then empty the remaining contents of the
>primary fermenter into the mesh bag, now positioned over the funnel leading
>to the glass secondary. When all the remaining fruit is in the mesh bag, I
>give it a light squeeze to get as much juice out of the fruit as possible.
>It's a little primitive, but I have been doing it for quite a while now with
>no problems. Everything, including my hands, is naturally sterilised
>thoroughly before the transfer process.
>    BTW, I am investing in a small fruit press within the next two months or
>so, in an effort to remove the manual hand pressing method. I will still
>allow the fruit to free-float during fermentation though.

>Cheers,
>Pete

 
 
 

couple of fruit wine questions

Post by PMyer » Thu, 08 May 2003 09:27:47




Quote:
> I very rarely use a mesh bag. I usually just throw everything in & stir at
> least once a day. When the fermentation begins to slow I use a fine mesh
> strainer to "scoop" the floating fruit/pulp into a mesh bag. I then
squeeze
> the pulp to get any juice out of it, return the juice to the primary. I
then
> let it set for a day to settle out before racking. I put a fine mesh
> strainer into my funnel & rack.

> Dr. Mac

    Such a simple process I had not even considered! That will make life
even easier until I get my fruit press. Thanks.

Pete

 
 
 

couple of fruit wine questions

Post by KENT MC LELLA » Thu, 08 May 2003 11:07:11


Actually I made one mistake in my description of my racking process. Instead
of putting the fine mesh strainer in the funnel during the final rack I put
it in the primary & siphon out of the strainer. That way I don't get my
siphon hose plugged up with any fruit I missed when scooping out the fruit
the day before.

Dr. MaC
--


Quote:



> > I very rarely use a mesh bag. I usually just throw everything in & stir
at
> > least once a day. When the fermentation begins to slow I use a fine mesh
> > strainer to "scoop" the floating fruit/pulp into a mesh bag. I then
> squeeze
> > the pulp to get any juice out of it, return the juice to the primary. I
> then
> > let it set for a day to settle out before racking. I put a fine mesh
> > strainer into my funnel & rack.

> > Dr. Mac

>     Such a simple process I had not even considered! That will make life
> even easier until I get my fruit press. Thanks.

> Pete

 
 
 

couple of fruit wine questions

Post by Ray » Wed, 21 May 2003 05:28:25


I really enjoy making fruit wines but I make grape wines as well.  (Yes,
grapes are fruit but I separate them in my mind.)  I do both the same.  I
just dump the fruit in the fermenter with water if called for and anything
else required and ferment it together.  Then a couple of times a day I stir
down the cape and press it a bit with my hands to help juice extraction.
When the cap falls I pour it through a mesh bag and either squeeze it with
my hands or with a little press.  Somehow I would rather have the fruit free
floating than in the bag.  Maybe just a personal preference.

Ray


Quote:
> Hi, I've started making a few fruit wines.. a couple of questions.

> Typically, I dump the fruit (cherries or whatever) into a mesh bag..
> The bag of fruit tends to float on the top of the primary fermentor
> with kind of an "iceberg" effect, leaving some fruit out of the
> liquid.. Is the fruit typically wieghted down so the yeast can work on
> all the fruit? (I do move the bag around during daily stirring to
> circulate it a bit)..

> Also, if you are using something like cherries or pineapple
> "tidbits".. is it best to use as is, or should you put them through a
> blender or something (to give the yeast more surface area to work
> on/better extract juices)..

> Thanks again for all the help.. This is one of the most friendly
> newsgroups on the net.