Cab Franc & elderberries

Cab Franc & elderberries

Post by jmreite » Mon, 20 May 2002 02:21:27



Hello all,
   I racked my Cab Franc yesterday and it seemed a little weak in color. I
have thrown in some oak beans to bring the oak up to speed but I doubt that
the oak beans alone will help with the weak color. I do have some dried
elderberries on hand. Would the dried elderberries help with the color? Your
thoughts and experiences please.
Joanne
 
 
 

Cab Franc & elderberries

Post by Lum » Mon, 20 May 2002 05:58:52



Quote:
> Hello all,
>    I racked my Cab Franc yesterday and it seemed a little weak in color. I
> have thrown in some oak beans to bring the oak up to speed but I doubt
that
> the oak beans alone will help with the weak color. I do have some dried
> elderberries on hand. Would the dried elderberries help with the color?
Your
> thoughts and experiences please.
> Joanne

Hi Joanne,

I am always surprised at how much color oak adds to light red wines.  I
would give the oak a chance.  You can add the dried elderberries later if
needed.

Good luck,
lum

 
 
 

Cab Franc & elderberries

Post by Zinf » Mon, 20 May 2002 07:10:30


Quote:

> Hello all,
>    I racked my Cab Franc yesterday and it seemed a little weak in color. I
> have thrown in some oak beans to bring the oak up to speed but I doubt that
> the oak beans alone will help with the weak color. I do have some dried
> elderberries on hand. Would the dried elderberries help with the color? Your
> thoughts and experiences please.
> Joanne

Hi Joanne,
I don't know if I would mess with a Cab Franc like that?  Color is not
required unless you are selling it.  Sure it looks pretty, but I think
taste, body, mouth-feel etc. is what is important.  If you are really
concerned about color, what about a color conditioner?  I have never
personally used one, but they say you can make your wine as dark as
you want without changing the flavor profile.

cheers,
Zinful

 
 
 

Cab Franc & elderberries

Post by jmreite » Mon, 20 May 2002 09:03:25


Zinful,
   I've never used a color conditioner, but that sounds rather artificial to
me. What are they made of? The reason I asked about elderberries is that
they are commonly used in Pinot Noir. The body of my Cab Franc appears to be
okay. It's just got weak color and I'd like to beef it up a bit. I check it
again after a week with the oak beans and see.
Joanne



Quote:
> > Hello all,
> >    I racked my Cab Franc yesterday and it seemed a little weak in color.
I
> > have thrown in some oak beans to bring the oak up to speed but I doubt
that
> > the oak beans alone will help with the weak color. I do have some dried
> > elderberries on hand. Would the dried elderberries help with the color?
Your
> > thoughts and experiences please.
> > Joanne

> Hi Joanne,
> I don't know if I would mess with a Cab Franc like that?  Color is not
> required unless you are selling it.  Sure it looks pretty, but I think
> taste, body, mouth-feel etc. is what is important.  If you are really
> concerned about color, what about a color conditioner?  I have never
> personally used one, but they say you can make your wine as dark as
> you want without changing the flavor profile.

> cheers,
> Zinful

 
 
 

Cab Franc & elderberries

Post by Eddie Vanderzeeu » Mon, 20 May 2002 10:26:37


Joanne,
Let the oak do its thing for a couple of weeks. Then make the decision to
add the elder berries or not. Wine colouring usually ends up in the bottom
of the bottle.
Eddie V.

--
Eddie V.
The Wine and Beer Factory.

1 (905) 791-347

Quote:
> Zinful,
>    I've never used a color conditioner, but that sounds rather artificial
to
> me. What are they made of? The reason I asked about elderberries is that
> they are commonly used in Pinot Noir. The body of my Cab Franc appears to
be
> okay. It's just got weak color and I'd like to beef it up a bit. I check
it
> again after a week with the oak beans and see.
> Joanne





> > > Hello all,
> > >    I racked my Cab Franc yesterday and it seemed a little weak in
color.
> I
> > > have thrown in some oak beans to bring the oak up to speed but I doubt
> that
> > > the oak beans alone will help with the weak color. I do have some
dried
> > > elderberries on hand. Would the dried elderberries help with the
color?
> Your
> > > thoughts and experiences please.
> > > Joanne

> > Hi Joanne,
> > I don't know if I would mess with a Cab Franc like that?  Color is not
> > required unless you are selling it.  Sure it looks pretty, but I think
> > taste, body, mouth-feel etc. is what is important.  If you are really
> > concerned about color, what about a color conditioner?  I have never
> > personally used one, but they say you can make your wine as dark as
> > you want without changing the flavor profile.

> > cheers,
> > Zinful

 
 
 

Cab Franc & elderberries

Post by Zinf » Mon, 20 May 2002 16:52:46


Quote:

> Zinful,
>    I've never used a color conditioner, but that sounds rather artificial to
> me. What are they made of?

I don't know?  I have never used one.
Quote:
> > cheers,
> > Zinful

 
 
 

Cab Franc & elderberries

Post by privat » Wed, 22 May 2002 00:50:59


Joanne,

I have never used these, but found them one day when I was searching for
wine supplies.  These descriptions are from Presque Isle:
http://shop.piwine.com/shopsite/prwc/add.html

XPRESS, Color and Tannin Intensifier for Red Wines.
1 oz dropper $2.20
16 oz dropper $17.80
3 liter $71.80
Produced by Vinovation Inc, Fresno, CA, this material is produced by
selective separation of monomeric grape tannins and color compounds from
dry red California wine. It is added to wine to adjust color and tannin
components. It will deepen and improve the color of any red or rose and
the increased tannins impart more of a sense of body to the wine. It
doesn't improve every wine, but it can often help. The recommended usage
would be 1 to 4% by volume. In our experience we have seldom wanted to
go above 1%. It should be stored at temperatures between 45oF and 70oF
and treated in storage like any other red wine: kept in filled
containers to minimize oxidation.

Exberry Grape Skin Extract, Food Color
1 oz dropper $4.10
4 oz dropper $11.55
16 oz dropper $39.20
This is a water soluble natural food color derived from grape skins. It
is mixed with invert sugar to produce a viscous dark red solution at 65o
to 70o Brix. It helps a great deal with increasing the depth of color in
red wines without a corresponding increase in tannins like the Xpress
listed above. The color is quite stable under most conditions, but
pigments have settled in a few cases. For that reason, we recommend
adding at least one week prior to bottling. It is produced by GNT
Nederland BV, Netherlands and meets FDA specifications as per Title 21
CFR, Part 73, Section 73.170. It should be stored in a freezer at 0o C
or colder. It has a shelf life of about a year at that temperature; less
if warmer. Since you will be working with small amounts of this
material, a Serological Pipet such as the SP5 or SP10 will permit
sufficient accuracy with your test samples so you can determine the
amount for the entire batch.

It looks like they are "all-natural", however, in the one case you are
adding a bit of sugar, in the other case extra tannins.  Don't know how
much the small amount of sugar would affect your wine.  Hope this helps,

Linda

Quote:

> Zinful,
>    I've never used a color conditioner, but that sounds rather artificial to
> me. What are they made of? The reason I asked about elderberries is that
> they are commonly used in Pinot Noir. The body of my Cab Franc appears to be
> okay. It's just got weak color and I'd like to beef it up a bit. I check it
> again after a week with the oak beans and see.
> Joanne

 
 
 

Cab Franc & elderberries

Post by Dave Drape » Wed, 22 May 2002 03:37:40


Might help with the colour, but I gave up trying to make an elderberry wine
that tastes any good some years ago now. I wouldn't risk screwing up a
decent grape wine this way!
Just my (v. occasional these days) 2 cents' worth.
Dave


Quote:
> Hello all,
>    I racked my Cab Franc yesterday and it seemed a little weak in color. I
> have thrown in some oak beans to bring the oak up to speed but I doubt
that
> the oak beans alone will help with the weak color. I do have some dried
> elderberries on hand. Would the dried elderberries help with the color?
Your
> thoughts and experiences please.
> Joanne