Bacteria?

Bacteria?

Post by David Besne » Mon, 13 Oct 1997 04:00:00



I'm new to wine making. I started a new batch using a Grand Cru wine
kit. My primary fermenter (a Pur Vin bucket) overflowed slightly during
the fermentation, and I was away and didn't notice until 2 weeks after
the fact. I do notice that there was some, well, bacteria around the
outside of the lid. Basically some small organisms. When I opened the
lid (which seems to fit very loosely), I could see some small patches of
white on the top of the wine. I didn't notice any bad smell or anything
else. I then siphoned it into my glass carboy. I do notice some stuff
floating to the top when I shake it, but I think it is just sediment
that came through during the transfer. I am really not in the mood to
toss a $60 Canadian wine kit out. What else can I look for to make sure
the wine is OK? Any tests I should do? When I first started the kit, I
didn't add any chemicals, just the yeast and water. When I transfered it
to the carboy, I added 1.5 tsp of metab. sulphite, 1 tsp bentonite, and
1 tsp Iso-Kleer. Anything else I should add? Thanks very much for any
help.

Kevin Besner

 
 
 

Bacteria?

Post by Bryan Fazek » Tue, 14 Oct 1997 04:00:00


On Sun, 12 Oct 1997 17:47:06 -0300, David Besner

Quote:

>I'm new to wine making. I started a new batch using a Grand Cru wine
>kit. My primary fermenter (a Pur Vin bucket) overflowed slightly during
>the fermentation, and I was away and didn't notice until 2 weeks after
>the fact. I do notice that there was some, well, bacteria around the
>outside of the lid. Basically some small organisms. When I opened the
>lid (which seems to fit very loosely), I could see some small patches of
>white on the top of the wine. I didn't notice any bad smell or anything
>else. I then siphoned it into my glass carboy. I do notice some stuff
>floating to the top when I shake it, but I think it is just sediment
>that came through during the transfer. I am really not in the mood to
>toss a $60 Canadian wine kit out. What else can I look for to make sure
>the wine is OK? Any tests I should do? When I first started the kit, I
>didn't add any chemicals, just the yeast and water. When I transfered it
>to the carboy, I added 1.5 tsp of metab. sulphite, 1 tsp bentonite, and
>1 tsp Iso-Kleer. Anything else I should add? Thanks very much for any
>help.

If you found stuff growing on the fermenter, this is a VERY bad sign.
If there is anything like a fungus or slime on top of the wine, the
answer is most likely yes - the wine is bad.  Your nose should tell
you if this is so.  A bad smell is very indicative of bad wine.

If you are unsure, let the wine age a bit.  If it's bad it will get
worse and you will know for sure.  As a newcomer, you probably don't
recognize all the smells and don't want to make a premature decision.

The problem is hygiene.  You have to keep EVERYTHING sterile.  The
best solution is to purchase sodium metabisulphite.  Two oz dissolved
in 1 gallon (4 liters) of water make a sterilizing solution that can
be reused.

Make new if the solution become cloudy, or if it stops stinking of
sulphure.

Rinse ALL equipment with this before use, and DO NOT rinse with water.
The sulphur is benficial to the wine in terms of preventing the growth
of microorganisms and as an antioxidant.

Bryan

"Thought is a beneficial process for human beings,
Excellence.  You should try it yourself on occasion."
  --Alexander Antonescu in "At Any Price", David Drake

 
 
 

Bacteria?

Post by (wino » Tue, 14 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I'm new to wine making. I started a new batch using a Grand Cru wine
> kit. My primary fermenter (a Pur Vin bucket) overflowed slightly during
> the fermentation, and I was away and didn't notice until 2 weeks after
> the fact. I do notice that there was some, well, bacteria around the
> outside of the lid. Basically some small organisms. When I opened the
> lid (which seems to fit very loosely), I could see some small patches of
> white on the top of the wine. I didn't notice any bad smell or anything
> else. I then siphoned it into my glass carboy. I do notice some stuff
> floating to the top when I shake it, but I think it is just sediment
> that came through during the transfer. I am really not in the mood to
> toss a $60 Canadian wine kit out. What else can I look for to make sure
> the wine is OK? Any tests I should do? When I first started the kit, I
> didn't add any chemicals, just the yeast and water. When I transfered it
> to the carboy, I added 1.5 tsp of metab. sulphite, 1 tsp bentonite, and
> 1 tsp Iso-Kleer. Anything else I should add? Thanks very much for any
> help.

> Kevin Besner


Hi Kevin;
If this white stuff is floating on top of the wine in the carboy, it is
probably "flowers of wine", ( a spoilage yeast thet requires oxygen).
The wine can be saved:

1.top the carboy to overflow, and remove the white junk that will rise
to the top. If some of the stuff is attached to the glass under the wine
level, GENTLY break it loose with a coat hanger, it should slowly float
to the top. remove all you can over about a 1/2 hour session.
2. Rack, adding at lest 30 ppm KMS, (sulphite) per gallon.
3. Always make sure the carboy is topped to within 1 " from the top.
4. The small air space, the sulphite, and time will tell.....

5. If the wine has no bad smell and no more "stuff" on top, the wine
should be OK.
For the record; very *** things can not exist in solutions over 10%
***.
Murph

 
 
 

Bacteria?

Post by Harry A. Demidavici » Fri, 24 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Something isn't right here.

What ever primary fermentation container that you use should have had
plenty of "headroom" for the most vigorous primary fermentation that
you could develop.  So ... did you "overfill"? Anyhow that was not
your question.  I guess I would try a tongue test on the mixture, by
trying just a bit to see if it was tasting like a primary/secondary
should be expected to be like.  If OK and the SG was down around .990,
I would proceed to terminate fermentation and go to the next step.  By
way of "editorial comment" [personal opinion], unless you live in
Calgary and it's mid January, two week seems like a long time to have
a kit in primary fermentation, especially one that seems to be so
active as to overflow a primary container.  What temp did you start it
at?  After 72 deg F the action becomes more ***, but should still
be well within the ability of a suitable container to do the job.
Don't know if that helped , or not ...

Harry Demidavicius
Calgary Alberta

On Sun, 12 Oct 1997 17:47:06 -0300, David Besner

Quote:

>I'm new to wine making. I started a new batch using a Grand Cru wine
>kit. My primary fermenter (a Pur Vin bucket) overflowed slightly during
>the fermentation, and I was away and didn't notice until 2 weeks after
>the fact. I do notice that there was some, well, bacteria around the
>outside of the lid. Basically some small organisms. When I opened the
>lid (which seems to fit very loosely), I could see some small patches of
>white on the top of the wine. I didn't notice any bad smell or anything
>else. I then siphoned it into my glass carboy. I do notice some stuff
>floating to the top when I shake it, but I think it is just sediment
>that came through during the transfer. I am really not in the mood to
>toss a $60 Canadian wine kit out. What else can I look for to make sure
>the wine is OK? Any tests I should do? When I first started the kit, I
>didn't add any chemicals, just the yeast and water. When I transfered it
>to the carboy, I added 1.5 tsp of metab. sulphite, 1 tsp bentonite, and
>1 tsp Iso-Kleer. Anything else I should add? Thanks very much for any
>help.

>Kevin Besner