2nd pressing of Blueberry wine not starting fermentation.

2nd pressing of Blueberry wine not starting fermentation.

Post by c.. » Fri, 10 Aug 2001 09:09:07



Hi all,

My first batch of blueberry wine is doing fine, but the second batch I
started with 2nd pressing of the blueberries does not want to start
fermentation.  I have been waiting for almost 5 days.  The room is
around 25 deg C and the SG at 1.090.  This is the same as the first
batch.  Any ideas.  (I have added 2 tsp of yeast energizer to the 23 L
container fo must.)

Any suggestions?

Chris...

 
 
 

2nd pressing of Blueberry wine not starting fermentation.

Post by Mark Wachenschwa » Fri, 10 Aug 2001 14:10:11


Quote:

> Hi all,

> My first batch of blueberry wine is doing fine, but the second batch I
> started with 2nd pressing of the blueberries does not want to start
> fermentation.  I have been waiting for almost 5 days.  The room is
> around 25 deg C and the SG at 1.090.  This is the same as the first
> batch.  Any ideas.  (I have added 2 tsp of yeast energizer to the 23 L
> container fo must.)

> Any suggestions?

> Chris...

Chris,

Please be aware that the SG readings on 2nd run will be low due to
residual *** present in the fruit skins.  This may, or may not be
a factor.  I would recommend introducing a fresh yeast, aeration and
ensuring the temp is 75+F.  The yeast for 2nd run should be fairly
*** tolerant due to the residual mentioned before.  Therefore try,
Champagne, Port or Montpellier yeast.  IMHO.

 
 
 

2nd pressing of Blueberry wine not starting fermentation.

Post by Jack Kell » Fri, 10 Aug 2001 21:53:19


Chris, I commend you on your patience.  This happens every once in a
while.  The yeast in the pomace may have died of *** toxicity at
the end of the first run or it may simply be dormant because of the
abrupt changes in its environment.  Yeast have been known to do that.

You ought to prepare a new yeast starter and feed it a little of the
must every few hours until the culture is obviously going well in a
media of at least half must.  I usually use a cup of warm (not hot)
water with a little sugar and nutrient dissolved in it, introduce the
yeast, and a few hours later add 1/4 cup of must every hour or two,
depending on how well the yeast are doing.  When total additions equal
1 to 1-1/2 cups of must and the yeast seem healthy, I then pour half
of this very gently on top of the must (I want it to be at the top,
where there is plenty of air) and wait a few hours.  If it doesn't
take, I add a little of the must to the half of the starter I held
back and try again later, but it usually works.  When the fermentation
is going strong on top of the must, I stir shallowly.  A few hours
later I stir deeply.

Good luck, amigo, and keep at it.

Jack Keller, The Winemaking Home Page
http://www.FoundCollection.com/