Looking for a good corkscrew!

Looking for a good corkscrew!

Post by NomDeNett » Sun, 28 Jun 1998 04:00:00



Invest about  $ 5.00 - 10.00 on a good "waiter's cork-screw".

It looks alot like a pocket knife & works as follows:

-On the side opposite the auger is a somewhat dull, short-bladed knife for
removing the foil.

-At the end of the auger side of the***is a hingded metal brace.  Swing
out that brace, open the auger and drill it to the final spiral into the
cork.  Now pivot the corkscrew so that the opened brace is above the bottle.

-Now, lower the brace (swing it down on the hinge) and rest its lip on the
mouth of the bottle.

-Gently apply upward pressure to the bottom of the non-hinged side of the
cork***& voila!!

-The waiter's corkscrew has several features which make it the best, by far
to use:

-It is small & inexpensive.
-It does not mangle corks.  As a matter of fact, once you get good at using
it, it will leave only a small hole in the top of the cork.  - It will not
leave the "tension fissures" on the cork often associated with other
corkscrews.
-& most importantly; once you are good at the technique; the use of the
waiters' corkscrew NEVER fails to impress women!

-Ed

 
 
 

Looking for a good corkscrew!

Post by rm dascen » Tue, 30 Jun 1998 04:00:00



Quote:

> I am in the market for a good corkscrew.  Any suggestions on what I should
> look for and how much should I pay?

There is a wide range of styles and prices...from a few dollars and into
the hundreds.

Don't skimp if you use the thing often. As soon as you mangle even one
cork you probably will wish you had spent the extra money.

One very basic thing to look for is a "hollow screw". Your***should
look like a spring with the coil wrapping around an empty center. It
should not look like a nail with super wide threads. The hollow***is
far less likely to pull out of a cork, and less likely to deposit cork
flakes in your wine if you happen to insert too far.

You might also look for something that has an attached capsule cutter.
This is certainly not required since almost any kitchen or pocket knife
will do, but it can be convienient especially if you keep a***handy
when traveling.

My personal preference is toward the waiter's style made from some
enduring metal.

As an alternative, the "Screwpull" (25.00US) by le creuset should be
available in most kitchen stores It is very simple to use, and will handle
a wide variety of corks and bottle necks. It is lacking a bit in the
"style" area though.

 
 
 

Looking for a good corkscrew!

Post by Bryan Caspe » Tue, 30 Jun 1998 04:00:00


You may want to check out the corkscrew sold at Pampered Chef parties.  It is a
hollow***types that extracts the corks perfectly and then a reverse turn
will eject the cork from the corkscrew. Got one for Fathers Day from my wife and
I really like it. It is inexpensive.

Bryan Casper

 
 
 

Looking for a good corkscrew!

Post by Jon Dola » Tue, 30 Jun 1998 04:00:00


My favorite is an English made LAZY FISH.  It is aestetically pleasing  and
has a very smooth action that has yet to mangle a cork.  It looks like
stainless steel fish bones with the***coming out of the mouth of the fish,
you***the fish on and pull the tail.  I love it.  I think it ran somewhere
around $40 US and is carried by my local cooking store.

Jon.

Quote:

> I am in the market for a good corkscrew.  Any suggestions on what I should
> look for and how much should I pay?

> Thanks...

 
 
 

Looking for a good corkscrew!

Post by Greg Ruetsc » Wed, 01 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> I am in the market for a good corkscrew.  Any suggestions on what I should
> look for and how much should I pay?

> Thanks...

Although not a corkscrew, I was under the impression that the
"preferred" way of opening a bottle of wine is to use a device
that has two thin blades attached to a handle.  The blades are
a cork's diameter apart, and one shoves the blades between the
cork and the glass of the bottle.  When all the way inserted,
the cork is extracted by pulling the blades out while turning
the handle.  I think the idea is that the cork is left intact,
thus no bit of cork floating around in the wine.  These are
very inexpensive, and have worked well for me.  On all the Napa
and Sonoma winery tours I've taken, this is the only method of
opening a bottle of wine I've seen.
 
 
 

Looking for a good corkscrew!

Post by rm dascen » Wed, 01 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Quote:


> > I am in the market for a good corkscrew.  Any suggestions on what I should
> > look for and how much should I pay?

> > Thanks...

> Although not a corkscrew, I was under the impression that the
> "preferred" way of opening a bottle of wine is to use a device
> that has two thin blades attached to a handle.  The blades are
> a cork's diameter apart, and one shoves the blades between the
> cork and the glass of the bottle.  When all the way inserted,
> the cork is extracted by pulling the blades out while turning
> the handle.  I think the idea is that the cork is left intact,
> thus no bit of cork floating around in the wine.  These are
> very inexpensive, and have worked well for me.  On all the Napa
> and Sonoma winery tours I've taken, this is the only method of
> opening a bottle of wine I've seen.

This type of opener has been problematic for me with dry corks, loose
corks, and some of the synthetics. Dry corks will crumble along the prong
entry points. Loose corks will start to descend into the neck as a result
of the pressure. And depending on the synthetic, they will tear and shred
along the prong entry points. These experiences have been consistant with
several different tools and quality levels.

For the most part though I would agree that this types of opener does work
quite well and is certainly the most economical. However, I have seen
people struggle with them. Often they don't insert the prongs far enough
and, after withdrawing the tool, still have a portion of the cork still in
the bottle.

-ron

 
 
 

Looking for a good corkscrew!

Post by Shannon Wheele » Wed, 01 Jul 1998 04:00:00


That is my preferred 'corkscrew'. Works great.

Quote:


>> I am in the market for a good corkscrew.  Any suggestions on what I
should
>> look for and how much should I pay?

>> Thanks...

>Although not a corkscrew, I was under the impression that the
>"preferred" way of opening a bottle of wine is to use a device
>that has two thin blades attached to a handle.  The blades are
>a cork's diameter apart, and one shoves the blades between the
>cork and the glass of the bottle.  When all the way inserted,
>the cork is extracted by pulling the blades out while turning
>the handle.  I think the idea is that the cork is left intact,
>thus no bit of cork floating around in the wine.  These are
>very inexpensive, and have worked well for me.  On all the Napa
>and Sonoma winery tours I've taken, this is the only method of
>opening a bottle of wine I've seen.

 
 
 

Looking for a good corkscrew!

Post by MONROE3 » Thu, 02 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>> > I am in the market for a good corkscrew.  Any suggestions on what I
>should
>> > look for and how much should I pay?

>> > Thanks...

>> Although not a corkscrew, I was under the impression that the
>> "preferred" way of opening a bottle of wine is to use a device
>> that has two thin blades attached to a handle.  The blades are
>> a cork's diameter apart, and one shoves the blades between the
>> cork and the glass of the bottle.  When all the way inserted,
>> the cork is extracted by pulling the blades out while turning
>> the handle.  I think the idea is that the cork is left intact,
>> thus no bit of cork floating around in the wine.  These are
>> very inexpensive, and have worked well for me.  On all the Napa
>> and Sonoma winery tours I've taken, this is the only method of
>> opening a bottle of wine I've seen.

>This type of opener has been problematic for me with dry corks, loose
>corks, and some of the synthetics. Dry corks will crumble along the prong
>entry points. Loose corks will start to descend into the neck as a result
>of the pressure. And depending on the synthetic, they will tear and shred
>along the prong entry points. These experiences have been consistant with
>several different tools and quality levels.

>For the most part though I would agree that this types of opener does work
>quite well and is certainly the most economical. However, I have seen
>people struggle with them. Often they don't insert the prongs far enough
>and, after withdrawing the tool, still have a portion of the cork still in
>the bottle.

I never use a cork screw. It mangles the cork. I only use a cork puller. You
must use the "rock & twist" method. When inserting the cork puller, put the
long blade in first then the short blade and rock the handle back and forth
until its all the way in. Then twist the puller while applying an upward pull.
It will work every time without damaging the cork.

CS

 
 
 

Looking for a good corkscrew!

Post by Harry A. Demidavici » Thu, 02 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Got one; love it. It's perfect for the synthetic "corqs".  But have never
had any success with trying to open Australian wines.  Those puppies are in
there but TIGHT.
Harry Demidavicius

On Tue, 30 Jun 1998 12:58:07 -0700, Greg Ruetsch

Quote:


>> I am in the market for a good corkscrew.  Any suggestions on what I should
>> look for and how much should I pay?

>> Thanks...

>Although not a corkscrew, I was under the impression that the
>"preferred" way of opening a bottle of wine is to use a device
>that has two thin blades attached to a handle.  The blades are
>a cork's diameter apart, and one shoves the blades between the
>cork and the glass of the bottle.  When all the way inserted,
>the cork is extracted by pulling the blades out while turning
>the handle.  I think the idea is that the cork is left intact,
>thus no bit of cork floating around in the wine.  These are
>very inexpensive, and have worked well for me.  On all the Napa
>and Sonoma winery tours I've taken, this is the only method of
>opening a bottle of wine I've seen.