Haze Identification in Plum Wine

Haze Identification in Plum Wine

Post by jim » Sat, 13 Jan 2007 04:01:17



I made a Victoria Plum wine at the beginning of last Autumn.  It fermented a little quicker than I would have expected
but then I suppose it was unseasonally warm.  It finished but after the first few weeks, failed to throw down
significant sediment.  I know plum is reputed to take forever to clear, but it looked like something was wrong.  A
couple of weeks ago I smelled the wine and it smelled slightly sulphuric maybe even a tad eggy.   I know the plums
weren't treated with anything because they are from my grandmother's Victoria Plum tree and she leaves it alone.  Anyway
I gave the wine a bit of a thrashing as I read might work and that seemed to sort out the smell, but the odd look to the
wine remained.

I gave the wine a swirl and saw that it seemed to contain a 'haze' within (like mother of pearl in it).  The closes
match I have been able to find was on Jack Keller's site where he describes Lactic Acid Bacteria Haze.   I can only
pressume it is this as nothing else that I have read fits.

Anyway in my experiments so far I tried pectic enzyme in case it was a pectic haze and recently tried fining with
insinglass.  Neither have had even a tiny hint of success. The temperature where the wine is currently sitting is low
(10C / 50F - 15C / 60F) but I figured it wasn't so low as to denature enzymes.

Well I am unsure how to proceed.  Keller says to dose it with campden tablets 3 per Gallon and rack after 10 days.  I
hope to goodness that works.  It was my second winemaking attempt and a 5 gallon, it would be a shame to have to waste
it if it is savable. Does anyone have any other ideas as to what the problem might be?

 
 
 

Haze Identification in Plum Wine

Post by RD » Sat, 13 Jan 2007 04:29:32


It could be a protein haze.  Have you fined with Bentonite?  

RD

 
 
 

Haze Identification in Plum Wine

Post by jim » Sat, 13 Jan 2007 07:15:04


I didn't no.  I could try that.  Thanks.

Cheers, Jim

Quote:

> It could be a protein haze.  Have you fined with Bentonite?

> RD

 
 
 

Haze Identification in Plum Wine

Post by Joe Sallusti » Sat, 13 Jan 2007 07:54:11


I would try that too, but I never made plum.  Bentonite works wonders
on mead though.

Joe

Quote:

> I didn't no.  I could try that.  Thanks.

> Cheers, Jim


> > It could be a protein haze.  Have you fined with Bentonite?

> > RD

 
 
 

Haze Identification in Plum Wine

Post by jim » Sat, 13 Jan 2007 09:47:20


I never made plum either yet.  I made glossy pink *** soup so far!
Thanks for the reinforcement Joe
Quote:

>I would try that too, but I never made plum.  Bentonite works wonders
> on mead though.

> Joe


>> I didn't no.  I could try that.  Thanks.

>> Cheers, Jim


>> > It could be a protein haze.  Have you fined with Bentonite?

>> > RD

 
 
 

Haze Identification in Plum Wine

Post by jim » Sat, 13 Jan 2007 20:44:58


Fabulously this seems to be working rather well!  I wish I'd identified it properly in the first place.  Leaning towards
the mid-heavier dosage of bentonite I currently have precipitation to make Snowmen jealous.
 
 
 

Haze Identification in Plum Wine

Post by Joe Sallusti » Sat, 13 Jan 2007 20:52:06


I can't speak for plum but I have seen meads just fall before my eyes
after waiting for year for them to clear so I know what you mean.  It's
good when it _looks_ edible too...  :)

I bet that has something to do with the electrical charge of the haze
inducing particles.  Bentonite is opposite of a lot of fining agents.
The lees never really firm up, so just rack off and resettle those lees
again in a small full container and you will get a lot back.  You can
chill it after a day or so to speed it up.

Joe

Quote:

> Fabulously this seems to be working rather well!  I wish I'd identified it properly in the first place.  Leaning towards
> the mid-heavier dosage of bentonite I currently have precipitation to make Snowmen jealous.