What to do?

What to do?

Post by Matthew Burnha » Sat, 28 Aug 1999 04:00:00



Okay, I was happily flying (trying to) my heli, nice calm evening, then
suddenly lost control (this was on the ground luckily). Engine sped up,
rotors spinning faster and faster, but didn't take off (luckily), rotors
veered right and forward (towards me!) - I think the training gear caught on
something so it didn't slip (though the fact that there was no pitch
probably helped too!)

I thought it was radio interference and hoped I'd be able to regain control
and bring the throttle down but nothing seemed to be happening so we managed
to hold it down with a plank of wood (on top of the training gear). Then we
tried to pull the fuel line out with a stick to no avail. Then from the
other side tried to move the throttle, difficult being as the throttle servo
was still attached (though we weren't sure at the time). We decided to
retreat and wait for the fuel to run out (there was probably about 1/2 - 3/4
tank in there, though it didn't take long to burn at full throttle).

After investigation with a voltmeter and charger it transpires that the
batteries ran out quicker than I thought they would (probably due to the
mechanical gyro) so the receiver decided to pack up and kick the servos to
various positions before completely dying... luckily the pitch was thrown to
full low (ie. 0 degrees pitch on my setup while I'm learning) otherwise it
would have probably taken off and cartwheeled.

Anyway, what's the best thing to do in this situation (esp. if it's likely
to be running longer, or possibly going to take off under no control)? I
think it'd be useful to have some method of cutting the fuel line, but how
to do it - anything easy to make - something like a pair of 'remote control
scissors' on the end of the cane. Or a self-destruct button? :-) Obviously
the best idea's to make sure the batteries are charged, so I'm off to find a
battery indicator circuit to build...

Oh, and just to satisfy my dad, what's the funny thing at the front of a
Hirobo Shuttle ZX - it's a metal bar with a thumb hold on one end and piece
of *** on the other; 3in long through the servo tray (horizontally)
in-between the throttle and pitch servos. He seems to think it's some sort
of safety device... anyone know?

--
Matthew Burnham

 
 
 

What to do?

Post by reckless_lo.. » Sun, 29 Aug 1999 04:00:00


Always fly the heli in large open spaces such as found at a flying
club. Flying in the back yard not recommended. No am I not saying that
you did. Basically I consider the heli as expendable. If the heli is
there on the ground without any control for whatever reason I would not
go even near it. All it takes is a gust of wind or whatever and it can
come straight at you resulting in serious injury to yourself. Helis
are quick and easy to fix (although not cheap) unlike the human body
which takes a long time to heal and does not always heal completely.
Best as you did in the end leave it and let it run out of fuel. If the
heli did lift they generally dont go that far however there are
exceptions including one over here when the crystal fell out from the
Rx and flew a long way off landing on top of a house. Throwing an
object at the heli may result in the shattering of the blade and thus
result in blade shrapnel flying at you or a bystander. Have seen a
piece of broken blade fly for over 200m.
What size battery pack are you using ?. 600 mah packs are too small for
helis. Here we run 1400 mah packs some even use 2000 mah packs (C
size).
Always check the battery under load. Hobby shops sell such battery
checkers. Check before the first flight and check after every flight.
You may also purchase an on board battery checker which shows battery
condition by means of a row of LEDs.
It is highly recommended for a beginner to seek the assistance from
your local helicopter club. They will point out the correct method of
setting up the heli and its maintenance.
Dont know about the metal bar. It won't be a safety device.

Reckless Loony
More reckless and loonier than ever !!



Quote:
> Okay, I was happily flying (trying to) my heli, nice calm evening,
then
> suddenly lost control (this was on the ground luckily). Engine sped
up,
> rotors spinning faster and faster, but didn't take off (luckily),
rotors
> veered right and forward (towards me!) - I think the training gear
caught on
> something so it didn't slip (though the fact that there was no pitch
> probably helped too!)

> I thought it was radio interference and hoped I'd be able to regain
control
> and bring the throttle down but nothing seemed to be happening so we
managed
> to hold it down with a plank of wood (on top of the training gear).
Then we
> tried to pull the fuel line out with a stick to no avail. Then from
the
> other side tried to move the throttle, difficult being as the
throttle servo
> was still attached (though we weren't sure at the time). We decided to
> retreat and wait for the fuel to run out (there was probably about
1/2 - 3/4
> tank in there, though it didn't take long to burn at full throttle).

> After investigation with a voltmeter and charger it transpires that
the
> batteries ran out quicker than I thought they would (probably due to
the
> mechanical gyro) so the receiver decided to pack up and kick the
servos to
> various positions before completely dying... luckily the pitch was
thrown to
> full low (ie. 0 degrees pitch on my setup while I'm learning)
otherwise it
> would have probably taken off and cartwheeled.

> Anyway, what's the best thing to do in this situation (esp. if it's
likely
> to be running longer, or possibly going to take off under no
control)? I
> think it'd be useful to have some method of cutting the fuel line,
but how
> to do it - anything easy to make - something like a pair of 'remote
control
> scissors' on the end of the cane. Or a self-destruct button? :-)
Obviously
> the best idea's to make sure the batteries are charged, so I'm off to
find a
> battery indicator circuit to build...

> Oh, and just to satisfy my dad, what's the funny thing at the front
of a
> Hirobo Shuttle ZX - it's a metal bar with a thumb hold on one end and
piece
> of *** on the other; 3in long through the servo tray (horizontally)
> in-between the throttle and pitch servos. He seems to think it's some
sort
> of safety device... anyone know?

> --
> Matthew Burnham


Sent via Deja.com http://www.FoundCollection.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

 
 
 

What to do?

Post by FlyBar0 » Sun, 29 Aug 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>, but how
>to do it - anything easy to make - something like a pair of 'remote control
>scissors' on the end of the cane. Or a self-destruct button? :-) Obviously
>the best idea's to make sure the batteries are charged, so I'm off to find a
>battery indicator circuit to build...

 How abot a string tied around the fuel ine and routed out to the the tip of
one of the training gear ?  Just pull the string to to pop of the fuel line.
Quote:

>--
>Matthew Burnham


 
 
 

What to do?

Post by RCKRZ » Sun, 29 Aug 1999 04:00:00



Quote:

>Anyway, what's the best thing to do in this situation

CHECK YOUR BATT VOLTAGE, is the BEST thing to do. DO not get into
that situation.

Adam Tucker                
AMA 520901
Hurst Tx
ICQ#27191334
Remove "NOSPAM" to Reply by Email

 
 
 

What to do?

Post by Brian and Aleci » Sun, 29 Aug 1999 04:00:00


I have a filter installed in my fuel line so there is a breakable point.  I
use a pole with a hook on it because this happened to me once.  I grabbed
the fuel line with the hook and walla helicopter quit.

--
Brian and Alecia Bowers
Psc 79 Box 20441
Apo Ap 96364


Quote:
> Okay, I was happily flying (trying to) my heli, nice calm evening, then
> suddenly lost control (this was on the ground luckily). Engine sped up,
> rotors spinning faster and faster, but didn't take off (luckily), rotors
> veered right and forward (towards me!) - I think the training gear caught
on
> something so it didn't slip (though the fact that there was no pitch
> probably helped too!)

> I thought it was radio interference and hoped I'd be able to regain
control
> and bring the throttle down but nothing seemed to be happening so we
managed
> to hold it down with a plank of wood (on top of the training gear). Then
we
> tried to pull the fuel line out with a stick to no avail. Then from the
> other side tried to move the throttle, difficult being as the throttle
servo
> was still attached (though we weren't sure at the time). We decided to
> retreat and wait for the fuel to run out (there was probably about 1/2 -
3/4
> tank in there, though it didn't take long to burn at full throttle).

> After investigation with a voltmeter and charger it transpires that the
> batteries ran out quicker than I thought they would (probably due to the
> mechanical gyro) so the receiver decided to pack up and kick the servos to
> various positions before completely dying... luckily the pitch was thrown
to
> full low (ie. 0 degrees pitch on my setup while I'm learning) otherwise it
> would have probably taken off and cartwheeled.

> Anyway, what's the best thing to do in this situation (esp. if it's likely
> to be running longer, or possibly going to take off under no control)? I
> think it'd be useful to have some method of cutting the fuel line, but how
> to do it - anything easy to make - something like a pair of 'remote
control
> scissors' on the end of the cane. Or a self-destruct button? :-) Obviously
> the best idea's to make sure the batteries are charged, so I'm off to find
a
> battery indicator circuit to build...

> Oh, and just to satisfy my dad, what's the funny thing at the front of a
> Hirobo Shuttle ZX - it's a metal bar with a thumb hold on one end and
piece
> of *** on the other; 3in long through the servo tray (horizontally)
> in-between the throttle and pitch servos. He seems to think it's some sort
> of safety device... anyone know?

> --
> Matthew Burnham


 
 
 

What to do?

Post by Matthew Burnha » Sun, 29 Aug 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
> CHECK YOUR BATT VOLTAGE, is the BEST thing to do. DO not get into
> that situation.

Well yeah, I guessed that and am in the process of building an on-board
battery monitor!

--
Matthew Burnham

 
 
 

What to do?

Post by Matthew Burnha » Sun, 29 Aug 1999 04:00:00




Quote:
> I have a filter installed in my fuel line so there is a breakable point.
I
> use a pole with a hook on it because this happened to me once.  I grabbed
> the fuel line with the hook and walla helicopter quit.

Sounds like if we'd had something better to hand than a branch of a nearby
tree that had been chopped down we might have been able to yank it off at
the filter (comes off easily enough by hand without the rotos going round!).

--
Matthew Burnham

 
 
 

What to do?

Post by Matthew Burnha » Sun, 29 Aug 1999 04:00:00



[snipped]
Quote:
> Best as you did in the end leave it and let it run out of fuel. If the
> heli did lift they generally don't go that far however there are
> exceptions including one over here when the crystal fell out from the
> Rx and flew a long way off landing on top of a house.

[snipped]
It was a big enough field, just didn't know how far it would go if it took
off with the speed the rotors were going at. With hindsight, it was more
than likely to tip over and break it's rotors (thus not fly off) but this
wasn't obvious in the heat of the moment. We were a little worried about
what it might hit (though there were only trees in the immediate vicinity)
if it did take off though.

Quote:
> What size battery pack are you using ?. 600 mah packs are too small for
> heli's. Here we run 1400 mah packs some even use 2000 mah packs (C
> size).

I've got a feeling it's a 600mAh pack (not checked atm as it's in the other
room, but I will do) - it's the one that came with the radio - so I'll
probably get another one. Can I wire another 600mAh pack in parallel
provided there the same voltage (if so, what about a larger pack, ie. two
different sizes eg. 600mAh and 1400mAh?)

Quote:
> Always check the battery under load. Hobby shops sell such battery
> checkers. Check before the first flight and check after every flight.
> You may also purchase an on board battery checker which shows battery
> condition by means of a row of LED's.

I'm going to build one ASAP.

Quote:
> Don't know about the metal bar. It won't be a safety device.

Right, that's the argument with my dad sorted then. I've seen similar things
on other stuff (various semi-electronic semi-mechanical equipment eg. tape
recorders etc.) before and am as much in the dark about those too.

--
Matthew Burnham

 
 
 

What to do?

Post by Dave Feltne » Sun, 29 Aug 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>Obviously
>the best idea's to make sure the batteries are charged, so I'm off to >find

a battery indicator circuit to build...

Or better yet, just buy one. There are many commercial Rx batt monitors
available now. I also feel it's important to cycle your batteries to avoid a
memory which would otherwise cause your batteries to dump sooner than they
should.

If the helicopter had taken off without control, it probably wouldn't have
stayed in the air long, unlike a runaway plane which can fly for miles. The
best thing to do is the safest thing to do which is usually just back off
and don't take chances. Better to lose the helicopter than suffer major
injuries trying to save it and all the more reason not to fly in a
residential neighborhood for those who like to do so, not you obviously.
Glad your okay.

-Dave

http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Launchpad/6328/
Federal restrictions require substantial penalty for early withdrawal,
member FDIC.

 
 
 

What to do?

Post by reckless_lo.. » Mon, 30 Aug 1999 04:00:00




Quote:
> I have a filter installed in my fuel line so there is a breakable
point.  I
> use a pole with a hook on it because this happened to me once.  I
grabbed
> the fuel line with the hook and walla helicopter quit.

> --
> Brian and Alecia Bowers
> Psc 79 Box 20441
> Apo Ap 96364


The trouble with this method is that you need to get close to the heli.
You dont know what has caused the malfunction. Recently had two fixed
wing aircraft over here play up. One throttled up and took off by
itself while the Tx throttle was still at idle luckily it was very
early in the morning with just the two of us there. Turned out to be a
broken PCB where the Tx antenna secures to the board. The other plane
went to full power staying on the ground it proceeded straight towards
the pits veering off at the last moment stopping upon hitting an
obstruction (luckily not human). Cause still unknown. Picture this
happening as you are nice and close to the heli concentrating on trying
to pull that fuel line off while the heli is not secured in anyway. If
the Tx has stopped transmitting (remember at the time you dont know
what the fault is) and you are using a PPM Rx then that leaves the Rx
wide open to any glitch/noise thereby making the heli very
unpredictable as to what it will do next.

Reckless Loony
More reckless and loonier than ever !!

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

 
 
 

What to do?

Post by Glen Kimpto » Mon, 30 Aug 1999 04:00:00


I often wonder how a big blanket throne over the heli would go??
not that we carry blankets around with ua


Quote:
> Okay, I was happily flying (trying to) my heli, nice calm evening, then
> suddenly lost control (this was on the ground luckily). Engine sped up,
> rotors spinning faster and faster, but didn't take off (luckily), rotors
> veered right and forward (towards me!) - I think the training gear caught
on
> something so it didn't slip (though the fact that there was no pitch
> probably helped too!)

> I thought it was radio interference and hoped I'd be able to regain
control
> and bring the throttle down but nothing seemed to be happening so we
managed
> to hold it down with a plank of wood (on top of the training gear). Then
we
> tried to pull the fuel line out with a stick to no avail. Then from the
> other side tried to move the throttle, difficult being as the throttle
servo
> was still attached (though we weren't sure at the time). We decided to
> retreat and wait for the fuel to run out (there was probably about 1/2 -
3/4
> tank in there, though it didn't take long to burn at full throttle).

> After investigation with a voltmeter and charger it transpires that the
> batteries ran out quicker than I thought they would (probably due to the
> mechanical gyro) so the receiver decided to pack up and kick the servos to
> various positions before completely dying... luckily the pitch was thrown
to
> full low (ie. 0 degrees pitch on my setup while I'm learning) otherwise it
> would have probably taken off and cartwheeled.

> Anyway, what's the best thing to do in this situation (esp. if it's likely
> to be running longer, or possibly going to take off under no control)? I
> think it'd be useful to have some method of cutting the fuel line, but how
> to do it - anything easy to make - something like a pair of 'remote
control
> scissors' on the end of the cane. Or a self-destruct button? :-) Obviously
> the best idea's to make sure the batteries are charged, so I'm off to find
a
> battery indicator circuit to build...

> Oh, and just to satisfy my dad, what's the funny thing at the front of a
> Hirobo Shuttle ZX - it's a metal bar with a thumb hold on one end and
piece
> of *** on the other; 3in long through the servo tray (horizontally)
> in-between the throttle and pitch servos. He seems to think it's some sort
> of safety device... anyone know?

> --
> Matthew Burnham


 
 
 

What to do?

Post by Eric Jaakko » Tue, 31 Aug 1999 04:00:00


A guy mailed me who did this.  It bent his feathering shaft, may have
damaged a blade and burnt out his clutch liner too.

On Sun, 29 Aug 1999 18:54:15 +1000, "Glen Kimpton"

Quote:

>I often wonder how a big blanket throne over the heli would go??
>not that we carry blankets around with ua



>> Okay, I was happily flying (trying to) my heli, nice calm evening, then
>> suddenly lost control (this was on the ground luckily). Engine sped up,
>> rotors spinning faster and faster, but didn't take off (luckily), rotors
>> veered right and forward (towards me!) - I think the training gear caught
>on
>> something so it didn't slip (though the fact that there was no pitch
>> probably helped too!)

>> I thought it was radio interference and hoped I'd be able to regain
>control
>> and bring the throttle down but nothing seemed to be happening so we
>managed
>> to hold it down with a plank of wood (on top of the training gear). Then
>we
>> tried to pull the fuel line out with a stick to no avail. Then from the
>> other side tried to move the throttle, difficult being as the throttle
>servo
>> was still attached (though we weren't sure at the time). We decided to
>> retreat and wait for the fuel to run out (there was probably about 1/2 -
>3/4
>> tank in there, though it didn't take long to burn at full throttle).

>> After investigation with a voltmeter and charger it transpires that the
>> batteries ran out quicker than I thought they would (probably due to the
>> mechanical gyro) so the receiver decided to pack up and kick the servos to
>> various positions before completely dying... luckily the pitch was thrown
>to
>> full low (ie. 0 degrees pitch on my setup while I'm learning) otherwise it
>> would have probably taken off and cartwheeled.

>> Anyway, what's the best thing to do in this situation (esp. if it's likely
>> to be running longer, or possibly going to take off under no control)? I
>> think it'd be useful to have some method of cutting the fuel line, but how
>> to do it - anything easy to make - something like a pair of 'remote
>control
>> scissors' on the end of the cane. Or a self-destruct button? :-) Obviously
>> the best idea's to make sure the batteries are charged, so I'm off to find
>a
>> battery indicator circuit to build...

>> Oh, and just to satisfy my dad, what's the funny thing at the front of a
>> Hirobo Shuttle ZX - it's a metal bar with a thumb hold on one end and
>piece
>> of *** on the other; 3in long through the servo tray (horizontally)
>> in-between the throttle and pitch servos. He seems to think it's some sort
>> of safety device... anyone know?

>> --
>> Matthew Burnham


 
 
 

What to do?

Post by Gianmarc » Tue, 31 Aug 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> I often wonder how a big blanket throne over the heli would go??
> not that we carry blankets around with ua

well don't count on me for such experiment

i had a battery failure twice, first time due to my dumbness, but was my
first try with an heli. i just stepped back and waited for the fuel to
finish.

second time due to a faulty battery pack on an hirobo eagle. the voltage
dropped and while i still had the control of all the servos the throttle
servo went full power and stayed there. let me tell u that the view of a
60 heli full power and out of control is not very nice. i just stepped
back and waited. luckily i could control cyclic anc collective. just
before the fuel finished the rotor accellerated to an unbelievable
speed!! but i think engine and mechanics survived without harm.

i am considering the installation of a spring that would pull the
throttle to idle if the servo let go. we used to do it on car models to
avoid cars running around full speed ( 60 mph) out of control. that
could be a better solution than pulling the fuel line ( u don't want to
be around a rotor spinning out of control)

ciao

gm

 
 
 

What to do?

Post by Glen Kimpto » Wed, 01 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Much better than having the heli fly away!!


Quote:
> A guy mailed me who did this.  It bent his feathering shaft, may have
> damaged a blade and burnt out his clutch liner too.

> On Sun, 29 Aug 1999 18:54:15 +1000, "Glen Kimpton"

> >I often wonder how a big blanket throne over the heli would go??
> >not that we carry blankets around with ua



> >> Okay, I was happily flying (trying to) my heli, nice calm evening, then
> >> suddenly lost control (this was on the ground luckily). Engine sped up,
> >> rotors spinning faster and faster, but didn't take off (luckily),
rotors
> >> veered right and forward (towards me!) - I think the training gear
caught
> >on
> >> something so it didn't slip (though the fact that there was no pitch
> >> probably helped too!)

> >> I thought it was radio interference and hoped I'd be able to regain
> >control
> >> and bring the throttle down but nothing seemed to be happening so we
> >managed
> >> to hold it down with a plank of wood (on top of the training gear).
Then
> >we
> >> tried to pull the fuel line out with a stick to no avail. Then from the
> >> other side tried to move the throttle, difficult being as the throttle
> >servo
> >> was still attached (though we weren't sure at the time). We decided to
> >> retreat and wait for the fuel to run out (there was probably about
1/2 -
> >3/4
> >> tank in there, though it didn't take long to burn at full throttle).

> >> After investigation with a voltmeter and charger it transpires that the
> >> batteries ran out quicker than I thought they would (probably due to
the
> >> mechanical gyro) so the receiver decided to pack up and kick the servos
to
> >> various positions before completely dying... luckily the pitch was
thrown
> >to
> >> full low (ie. 0 degrees pitch on my setup while I'm learning) otherwise
it
> >> would have probably taken off and cartwheeled.

> >> Anyway, what's the best thing to do in this situation (esp. if it's
likely
> >> to be running longer, or possibly going to take off under no control)?
I
> >> think it'd be useful to have some method of cutting the fuel line, but
how
> >> to do it - anything easy to make - something like a pair of 'remote
> >control
> >> scissors' on the end of the cane. Or a self-destruct button? :-)
Obviously
> >> the best idea's to make sure the batteries are charged, so I'm off to
find
> >a
> >> battery indicator circuit to build...

> >> Oh, and just to satisfy my dad, what's the funny thing at the front of
a
> >> Hirobo Shuttle ZX - it's a metal bar with a thumb hold on one end and
> >piece
> >> of *** on the other; 3in long through the servo tray (horizontally)
> >> in-between the throttle and pitch servos. He seems to think it's some
sort
> >> of safety device... anyone know?

> >> --
> >> Matthew Burnham


 
 
 

What to do?

Post by Beavi » Wed, 01 Sep 1999 04:00:00




Quote:
>I often wonder how a big blanket throne over the heli would go??
>not that we carry blankets around with ua

BANG!!

Beav

You can E-MAil me at the usual place (Beavis at nachos dot demon dot co dot uk)

Or you can visit my website (although why you'd want to I have NO idea) at

www.nachos.demon.co.uk