Painting question

Painting question

Post by Eddi » Mon, 01 Oct 2001 17:55:13



Hi guys,
            I'm in the process of painting a canopy with automotive acrylic
lacquer type paints and was just wondering what would be recommended for the
clear coat to fuel proof it?
If I just use clear lacquer it won't be fuel proof will it?
I was told by one guy that epoxy 2pac will not be compatible with the
lacquer ??????(not sure if the guy knew what he was talking about)
What else is available? How would Urethane go?

Any suggestions most welcome.

Thanks
Eddie

 
 
 

Painting question

Post by Biggie from P » Mon, 01 Oct 2001 23:41:29


Is you canopy fiberglass or stock plastic.  If it is the plastic, you need
to prep it like auto body guys do plastic bumper on cars.  Otherwise no
paint will stick.


Quote:
> Hi guys,
>             I'm in the process of painting a canopy with automotive
acrylic
> lacquer type paints and was just wondering what would be recommended for
the
> clear coat to fuel proof it?
> If I just use clear lacquer it won't be fuel proof will it?
> I was told by one guy that epoxy 2pac will not be compatible with the
> lacquer ??????(not sure if the guy knew what he was talking about)
> What else is available? How would Urethane go?

> Any suggestions most welcome.

> Thanks
> Eddie


 
 
 

Painting question

Post by Beavi » Tue, 02 Oct 2001 07:24:30




Quote:
> Is you canopy fiberglass or stock plastic.  If it is the
plastic, you need
> to prep it like auto body guys do plastic bumper on cars.
Otherwise no
> paint will stick.

Not exactly the question though Biggie. The question was what to
use to fuel proof an already painted canopy.

Beav

--
Please note my E-mail address is now
beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com (with the obvious
changes) and

Beavisland now lives at
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/kevin.maxfield/

 
 
 

Painting question

Post by Jim Nunnalle » Tue, 02 Oct 2001 07:29:18


Here's what I have been using with excellent results.
Primer:  Rust-oleum auto primer, light gray #2081
White base coat and color coat: PPG Deltron 2000 DBC (pretty sure it is
an acrylic lacquer paint)
Clear coat:  PPG Delclear DAU 75 Acrylic Urethane Clear with 5 Star 5108
acrylic enamel hardener. (extremely fuel proof and won't yellow)
I've also had very good luck using Testors Pactra Racing Finish paints
for the color coat.

Jim Nunnallee
Ft. Meade, FL  USA


Quote:
> Hi guys,
>             I'm in the process of painting a canopy with automotive
acrylic
> lacquer type paints and was just wondering what would be recommended
for the
> clear coat to fuel proof it?
> If I just use clear lacquer it won't be fuel proof will it?
> I was told by one guy that epoxy 2pac will not be compatible with the
> lacquer ??????(not sure if the guy knew what he was talking about)
> What else is available? How would Urethane go?

> Any suggestions most welcome.

> Thanks
> Eddie

 
 
 

Painting question

Post by Beavi » Tue, 02 Oct 2001 07:30:40



Quote:
> Hi guys,
>             I'm in the process of painting a canopy with
automotive acrylic
> lacquer type paints and was just wondering what would be
recommended for the
> clear coat to fuel proof it?

2 pack acrylic lacquer does a good job of fuel proofing up to 15%
and that's when you lay the canopy IN the fuel (or ON the fuel
that's run all over the place like I did.. ONCE!)

I've also heard it's good for 30% if it's not soaked in it. It
will CERTAINLY stand up to 30% nitor fuel being burnt and shoved
out of the exhaust.

Quote:
> If I just use clear lacquer it won't be fuel proof will it?

It will.

Quote:
> I was told by one guy that epoxy 2pac will not be compatible
with the
> lacquer ??????

2 pack epoxy is just about as compatible with ANYTHING as you're
ever likely to find. Epoxy is pretty smelly, but "destructive"
and it's not not the eopxy you need concern yourself with anyway,
it's the toluene that we use to thin it. Don't overthin the clear
coat and you shouldn't have any problems going over an acrylic
base.

(not sure if the guy knew what he was talking about)

Quote:
> What else is available? How would Urethane go?

Urethane (poly) is excellent. Fuel proof and hard, but hells
teeth it stinks :-)

Beav

--
Please note my E-mail address is now
beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com (with the obvious
changes) and

Beavisland now lives at
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/kevin.maxfield/

 
 
 

Painting question

Post by Eddi » Tue, 02 Oct 2001 21:03:55


Thanx guys.
As always.....very helpful

Eddie


Quote:
> Hi guys,
>             I'm in the process of painting a canopy with automotive
acrylic
> lacquer type paints and was just wondering what would be recommended for
the
> clear coat to fuel proof it?
> If I just use clear lacquer it won't be fuel proof will it?
> I was told by one guy that epoxy 2pac will not be compatible with the
> lacquer ??????(not sure if the guy knew what he was talking about)
> What else is available? How would Urethane go?

> Any suggestions most welcome.

> Thanks
> Eddie

 
 
 

Painting question

Post by John W Jackso » Tue, 02 Oct 2001 22:05:12


Pactra paints, which is available where most plastic models are sold, will
generally adhear well to plastics and can be convered with automotive clear
coat.
Quote:

> Is you canopy fiberglass or stock plastic.  If it is the plastic, you need
> to prep it like auto body guys do plastic bumper on cars.  Otherwise no
> paint will stick.



> > Hi guys,
> >             I'm in the process of painting a canopy with automotive
> acrylic
> > lacquer type paints and was just wondering what would be recommended for
> the
> > clear coat to fuel proof it?
> > If I just use clear lacquer it won't be fuel proof will it?
> > I was told by one guy that epoxy 2pac will not be compatible with the
> > lacquer ??????(not sure if the guy knew what he was talking about)
> > What else is available? How would Urethane go?

> > Any suggestions most welcome.

> > Thanks
> > Eddie

 
 
 

Painting question

Post by Robert Klenk » Wed, 03 Oct 2001 01:50:13


Quote:



> > Hi guys,
> >             I'm in the process of painting a canopy with
> automotive acrylic
> > lacquer type paints and was just wondering what would be
> recommended for the
> > clear coat to fuel proof it?

> 2 pack acrylic lacquer does a good job of fuel proofing up to 15%
> and that's when you lay the canopy IN the fuel (or ON the fuel
> that's run all over the place like I did.. ONCE!)

> I've also heard it's good for 30% if it's not soaked in it. It
> will CERTAINLY stand up to 30% nitor fuel being burnt and shoved
> out of the exhaust.

> > If I just use clear lacquer it won't be fuel proof will it?

> It will.

> > I was told by one guy that epoxy 2pac will not be compatible
> with the
> > lacquer ??????

> 2 pack epoxy is just about as compatible with ANYTHING as you're
> ever likely to find. Epoxy is pretty smelly, but "destructive"
> and it's not not the eopxy you need concern yourself with anyway,
> it's the toluene that we use to thin it. Don't overthin the clear
> coat and you shouldn't have any problems going over an acrylic
> base.

> (not sure if the guy knew what he was talking about)
> > What else is available? How would Urethane go?

> Urethane (poly) is excellent. Fuel proof and hard, but hells
> teeth it stinks :-)

Yea, and if its the DuPont stuff, with isocyanates, it will kill you
too! From the MSDS sheets:

"If this product contains isocyanates or is used with an isocyanate
activator/hardener, wear a positive-pressure, supplied-air respirator
(NIOSH approved TC-19C) during spray application."

and:

"Exposure to isocyanates may cause respiratory sensitization. This
effect may be permanent. Symptoms include an asthma-like reaction with
shortness of breath, wheezing, cough or permanent lung sensitization.
This effect may be delayed for several hours after exposure. Repeated
overexposure to isocyanates may cause a decrease in lung function, which
may be permanent. Individuals with lung or breathing problems or prior
reactions to isocyanates must not be exposed to vapors or spray mist of
this product."

I talked with a guy who used it on a giant scale airplane without a
respirator and the next day found himself in the hospital with shortness
of breath and bleeding lungs.

        I hope you're not smelling this stuff! The stuff is rock hard and
crystal clear though as long as you have the equipment to use it
right...

Bob

Quote:

> Beav

> --
> Please note my E-mail address is now
> beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com (with the obvious
> changes) and

> Beavisland now lives at
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------
 Bob Klenke, Associate Professor     Dept. of Electrical Engineering
                                     School of Engineering
 Phone: (804) 827-7007               601 West Main St., Room 222
 Fax:   (804) 828-4269               ***ia Commonwealth University

----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 

Painting question

Post by Beavi » Wed, 03 Oct 2001 04:06:16



Quote:



> > > Hi guys,
> > >             I'm in the process of painting a canopy with
> > automotive acrylic
> > > lacquer type paints and was just wondering what would be
> > recommended for the
> > > clear coat to fuel proof it?

> > 2 pack acrylic lacquer does a good job of fuel proofing up to
15%
> > and that's when you lay the canopy IN the fuel (or ON the
fuel
> > that's run all over the place like I did.. ONCE!)

> > I've also heard it's good for 30% if it's not soaked in it.
It
> > will CERTAINLY stand up to 30% nitor fuel being burnt and
shoved
> > out of the exhaust.

> > > If I just use clear lacquer it won't be fuel proof will it?

> > It will.

> > > I was told by one guy that epoxy 2pac will not be
compatible
> > with the
> > > lacquer ??????

> > 2 pack epoxy is just about as compatible with ANYTHING as
you're
> > ever likely to find. Epoxy is pretty smelly, but
"destructive"
> > and it's not not the eopxy you need concern yourself with
anyway,
> > it's the toluene that we use to thin it. Don't overthin the
clear
> > coat and you shouldn't have any problems going over an
acrylic
> > base.

> > (not sure if the guy knew what he was talking about)
> > > What else is available? How would Urethane go?

> > Urethane (poly) is excellent. Fuel proof and hard, but hells
> > teeth it stinks :-)

> Yea, and if its the DuPont stuff, with isocyanates, it will
kill you
> too! From the MSDS sheets:

> "If this product contains isocyanates or is used with an
isocyanate
> activator/hardener, wear a positive-pressure, supplied-air
respirator
> (NIOSH approved TC-19C) during spray application."

> and:

> "Exposure to isocyanates may cause respiratory sensitization.
This
> effect may be permanent. Symptoms include an asthma-like
reaction with
> shortness of breath, wheezing, cough or permanent lung
sensitization.
> This effect may be delayed for several hours after exposure.
Repeated
> overexposure to isocyanates may cause a decrease in lung
function, which
> may be permanent. Individuals with lung or breathing problems
or prior
> reactions to isocyanates must not be exposed to vapors or spray
mist of
> this product."

> I talked with a guy who used it on a giant scale airplane
without a
> respirator and the next day found himself in the hospital with
shortness
> of breath and bleeding lungs.

> I hope you're not smelling this stuff! The stuff is rock hard
and
> crystal clear though as long as you have the equipment to use
it
> right...

I won't touch it without wearing an air-fed, and anyone who does
is a fool.

I've made mention of this on my website where I discuss various
bits and pieces about painting.

Beav

--
Please note my E-mail address is now
beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com (with the obvious
changes) and

Beavisland now lives at
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/kevin.maxfield/

 
 
 

Painting question

Post by Robert Klenk » Wed, 03 Oct 2001 04:30:37


Quote:



[snip]
> > > Urethane (poly) is excellent. Fuel proof and hard, but hells
> > > teeth it stinks :-)

> > Yea, and if its the DuPont stuff, with isocyanates, it will
> kill you
> > too! From the MSDS sheets:

> > "If this product contains isocyanates or is used with an
> isocyanate
> > activator/hardener, wear a positive-pressure, supplied-air
> respirator
> > (NIOSH approved TC-19C) during spray application."

> > and:

> > "Exposure to isocyanates may cause respiratory sensitization.
> This
> > effect may be permanent. Symptoms include an asthma-like
> reaction with
> > shortness of breath, wheezing, cough or permanent lung
> sensitization.
> > This effect may be delayed for several hours after exposure.
> Repeated
> > overexposure to isocyanates may cause a decrease in lung
> function, which
> > may be permanent. Individuals with lung or breathing problems
> or prior
> > reactions to isocyanates must not be exposed to vapors or spray
> mist of
> > this product."

> > I talked with a guy who used it on a giant scale airplane
> without a
> > respirator and the next day found himself in the hospital with
> shortness
> > of breath and bleeding lungs.

> > I hope you're not smelling this stuff! The stuff is rock hard
> and
> > crystal clear though as long as you have the equipment to use
> it
> > right...

> I won't touch it without wearing an air-fed, and anyone who does
> is a fool.

I would agree with that. My problem with using it is that my only heated
spray area is in the garage in which also resides the air handling unit
for the 1st floor of my house! The only solution to that has been to get
a professional to apply the clear coat in the few instances that I've
used it. This tends to get quite expensive. Chevron Perfect one-part
urethane from a spray can is fairly durable and not as deadly as the
2-part stuff, unless you live in California (sorry, U.S. joke).
Unfortunately, its not nearly as clear and does not go on as well
either...

Bob

Quote:

> I've made mention of this on my website where I discuss various
> bits and pieces about painting.

> Beav

> --
> Please note my E-mail address is now
> beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com (with the obvious
> changes) and

> Beavisland now lives at
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------
 Bob Klenke, Associate Professor     Dept. of Electrical Engineering
                                     School of Engineering
 Phone: (804) 827-7007               601 West Main St., Room 222
 Fax:   (804) 828-4269               ***ia Commonwealth University

----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 

Painting question

Post by Beavi » Wed, 03 Oct 2001 19:50:12



Quote:




> [snip]
> > > > Urethane (poly) is excellent. Fuel proof and hard, but
hells
> > > > teeth it stinks :-)

> > > Yea, and if its the DuPont stuff, with isocyanates, it will
> > kill you
> > > too! From the MSDS sheets:

> > > "If this product contains isocyanates or is used with an
> > isocyanate
> > > activator/hardener, wear a positive-pressure, supplied-air
> > respirator
> > > (NIOSH approved TC-19C) during spray application."

> > > and:

> > > "Exposure to isocyanates may cause respiratory
sensitization.
> > This
> > > effect may be permanent. Symptoms include an asthma-like
> > reaction with
> > > shortness of breath, wheezing, cough or permanent lung
> > sensitization.
> > > This effect may be delayed for several hours after
exposure.
> > Repeated
> > > overexposure to isocyanates may cause a decrease in lung
> > function, which
> > > may be permanent. Individuals with lung or breathing
problems
> > or prior
> > > reactions to isocyanates must not be exposed to vapors or
spray
> > mist of
> > > this product."

> > > I talked with a guy who used it on a giant scale airplane
> > without a
> > > respirator and the next day found himself in the hospital
with
> > shortness
> > > of breath and bleeding lungs.

> > > I hope you're not smelling this stuff! The stuff is rock
hard
> > and
> > > crystal clear though as long as you have the equipment to
use
> > it
> > > right...

> > I won't touch it without wearing an air-fed, and anyone who
does
> > is a fool.

> I would agree with that. My problem with using it is that my
only heated
> spray area is in the garage in which also resides the air
handling unit
> for the 1st floor of my house! The only solution to that has
been to get
> a professional to apply the clear coat in the few instances
that I've
> used it. This tends to get quite expensive.

You're going to the wrong places to get it top coated Bob. I've
taken one or two canopies to a local car repair shop in the past
and just asked them to squirt the lacquer on when they next do a
job.

All they've ever charged me (and it's not really a charge) is a
drink. Canopies don't even take "a tenth" (1/10th litre) which is
pretty hard to measure for costing purposes, so it gets chalked
up to spillage. I've even done other folks' canopies using the
same "rule".

If  I'm lacquering a big job, then including spraying a canopy
costs less than *** all, so I do it as I would a boot spoiler
or a wing mirror, hang it up and give it a squirt as I wander
around the car:-)

In your case, I wouldn't be spraying in the garage though, not if
you feed air from there to some other part of your house.

Beav

--
Please note my E-mail address is now
beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com (with the obvious
changes) and

Beavisland now lives at
http://www.FoundCollection.com/