WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by conferenceroo.. » Tue, 26 Feb 2013 07:37:08



Hello,

The other day I decided to use my GE.World Monitor (1968 radio) and listen to SW. (by the way its a great radio! very sensitive)

I know it was during the day, but I used to be able to pick stuff up even before sundown.

When I try at night, there seems to nothing but more  interfence and hardly any programming other than religous programing and China. Whats happend to Radio Moscow? the BBC? radio Nederlands? Albania?

Is Shortwave going away too? When the powers out ain't nothing gonna beat a radio.

Your thoughts are appreciated.

Thanks. Barry

 
 
 

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by Brenda Dye » Tue, 26 Feb 2013 08:23:52




Hello,

The other day I decided to use my GE.World Monitor (1968 radio) and listen
to SW. (by the way its a great radio! very sensitive)

I know it was during the day, but I used to be able to pick stuff up even
before sundown.

When I try at night, there seems to nothing but more  interfence and hardly
any programming other than religous programing and China. Whats happend to
Radio Moscow? the BBC? radio Nederlands? Albania?

Is Shortwave going away too? When the powers out ain't nothing gonna beat a
radio.

Your thoughts are appreciated.

Thanks. Barry

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Radio Moscow is no more. Taking their place is Voice of Russia. I receive
them fine here on 40m (~7.2 MHz, not sure of the exact frequency).  The BBC
no longer transmits to N. America, but can be heard at some times in various
parts of the country. You have to look carefully for them, though, as there
is no strong signal. R. Netherlands is no longer on the air.

Best times to listen:

Morning:
5-7 MHz
Afternoon:
10-25 MHz
Evening:
5-15 MHz

This is a bit of an oversimplification, but good enough for a rule of thumb.

 
 
 

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by conferenceroo.. » Tue, 26 Feb 2013 10:22:58


Quote:

----- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Radio Moscow is no more. Taking their place is Voice of Russia. I receive them fine here on 40m (~7.2 MHz, not sure of the exact frequency). The BBC no longer transmits to N. America, but can be heard at some times in various parts of the country. You have to look carefully for them, though, as there is no strong signal. R. Netherlands is no longer on the air. Best times to listen: Morning: 5-7 MHz Afternoon: 10-25 MHz Evening: 5-15 MHz This is a bit of an oversimplification, but good enough for a rule of thumb.

Thank you Brenda...do you think that SW will survive?
 
 
 

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by Michael Blac » Tue, 26 Feb 2013 10:58:53


Quote:

> Hello,

> The other day I decided to use my GE.World Monitor (1968 radio) and
> listen to SW. (by the way its a great radio! very sensitive)

> I know it was during the day, but I used to be able to pick stuff up
> even before sundown.

> When I try at night, there seems to nothing but more interfence and
> hardly any programming other than religous programing and China. Whats
> happend to Radio Moscow? the BBC? radio Nederlands? Albania?

> Is Shortwave going away too? When the powers out ain't nothing gonna
> beat a radio.

Shortwave of course was traditionally national broadcasters (with a bit of
religious and a slight bit of commercial).  Forty years ago there was talk
of it being the end of shortwave, but that didn't happen, it certainly got
better from the standpoint of the receiver as Sony and other Japanese
companies came in with "modern" receivers, so much easier to tune, and to
figure out the frequency than those that came before (except if you paid a
lot of  money).

But over the past decade or so, a lot of national broadcasters have
abandoned shortwave.  They don't see the listenership there, they realize
that for many, they can reach them with other means (I gather many NPR
stations in the US carry BBC programming overnight, something that wasn't
available in the past, and of course there's the internet).  They look at
the cost of keeping the transmitters going, and decide there is better
ways to spend the money.

So a lot of the countries that used to be on are no longer there.

It's a compliated thing, since there were the hobbyists who were maybe
most interested in hearing distant stations (so some of the prime
programming was the programs about shortwave listening), while a whole
other branch wasn't interested in the hobby, they either wanted news from
"the old country", or they had an interest in world news or some specific
country, or perhaps they were interested in the cultural aspects.

The news is available elsewhere.  Shortwave suffers badly from fading,
which really puts a damper on listenig to music (so once the cultural
types could get it elsewhere, "world music" CDs or the internet, there
went another chunk of people).  The hobbyists were never quite the market
for the shortwave stations, though I suppose when propaganda was an
important concept, getting any listeners helped in that way.

So the same people who bought into shortwave when Sony and the rest
started making nice portable receivers have mostly gone elsewhere.  That's
surely why I keep finding interesting transistor shortwave receivers at
garage sales for a few dollars.

The Source here in Canada (what had previously been Radio Shack in Canada)
has virtually nothing in the way of shortwave receivers now.  Even a few
years ago they carried about six models, now they have one of those 30.00
analog radios that happen to have a frequency counter for a dial,
maybe a windup radio that incidentally carries shortwave (I"m not sure if
any of the windups do cover sw now, and it always seemed more like a
marketing thing for those radios, "get shortwave for emergencies" since
they really weren't great radios at the price level), the Grundig/Eton G8
that seems to get good reviews as an FM receiver but the sw specs seem not
so great  and a recent Grundig/Eton that seems more interesting because it
is also an MP3 player than because it covers shortwave.  None of the
current shortwave radios have BFOs.  Even about five years ago, the chain
still had the Grundig Satellite 800 and then the 750, better than portable
radios.

So it's now back to the specialty stores to buy shortwave radios in
Canada.

   Michael

 
 
 

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by conferenceroo.. » Tue, 26 Feb 2013 12:35:53


Quote:

> Hello, The other day I decided to use my GE.World Monitor (1968 radio) and listen to SW. (by the way its a great radio! very sensitive) I know it was during the day, but I used to be able to pick stuff up even before sundown. When I try at night, there seems to nothing but more interfence and hardly any programming other than religous programing and China. Whats happend to Radio Moscow? the BBC? radio Nederlands? Albania? Is Shortwave going away too? When the powers out ain't nothing gonna beat a radio. Your thoughts are appreciated. Thanks. Barry

Very interesting reply. Thanks!  I own  very simple radios with SW bands. My GE World Monitor doesn't have a BFO but there was so much to listen to.

What about Isreal? I picked them up last year. I used to listen to Cario too.

I much prefer radio towers to streaming. I'm such a dinosour.

 
 
 

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by Brenda Dye » Tue, 26 Feb 2013 12:49:43




Quote:

> Hello, The other day I decided to use my GE.World Monitor (1968 radio) and
> listen to SW. (by the way its a great radio! very sensitive) I know it was
> during the day, but I used to be able to pick stuff up even before
> sundown. When I try at night, there seems to nothing but more interfence
> and hardly any programming other than religous programing and China. Whats
> happend to Radio Moscow? the BBC? radio Nederlands? Albania? Is Shortwave
> going away too? When the powers out ain't nothing gonna beat a radio. Your
> thoughts are appreciated. Thanks. Barry

Very interesting reply. Thanks!  I own  very simple radios with SW bands. My
GE World Monitor doesn't have a BFO but there was so much to listen to.

What about Isreal? I picked them up last year. I used to listen to Cario
too.

I much prefer radio towers to streaming. I'm such a dinosour.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

One of the things I forgot to mention, that has a huge bearing on the
difficulty of SWL in N. America is that the primary relay station in Canada
(Sackville) has been taken offline, so now we have to try to hear things
direct or through other relays.

 
 
 

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by conferenceroo.. » Tue, 26 Feb 2013 13:57:35


Quote:

> Hello, The other day I decided to use my GE.World Monitor (1968 radio) and listen to SW. (by the way its a great radio! very sensitive) I know it was during the day, but I used to be able to pick stuff up even before sundown. When I try at night, there seems to nothing but more interfence and hardly any programming other than religous programing and China. Whats happend to Radio Moscow? the BBC? radio Nederlands? Albania? Is Shortwave going away too? When the powers out ain't nothing gonna beat a radio. Your thoughts are appreciated. Thanks. Barry

Will AM broadcast radio go the same way as SW? Will SW make a comeback?
 
 
 

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by conferenceroo.. » Tue, 26 Feb 2013 21:33:54


Quote:

> Hello, The other day I decided to use my GE.World Monitor (1968 radio) and listen to SW. (by the way its a great radio! very sensitive) I know it was during the day, but I used to be able to pick stuff up even before sundown. When I try at night, there seems to nothing but more interfence and hardly any programming other than religous programing and China. Whats happend to Radio Moscow? the BBC? radio Nederlands? Albania? Is Shortwave going away too? When the powers out ain't nothing gonna beat a radio. Your thoughts are appreciated. Thanks. Barry

My house is overflowing with restored tube radios and 3000 vinyl jazz-swing-blues records..(my son only buys 78s!) I have an FM transmitter connected to my pc, an AM transmitter connected to my Stereo Amp. We listen to all of our music on the radios.

In my living room, I have a restored 1941 RCA 29K console radio. My aunt gave it to me when I was 15 in 1970, I've been caring for it ever since.

Long live old Tech!!!

 
 
 

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by philo » Tue, 26 Feb 2013 23:31:27



Quote:
> Hello,

> The other day I decided to use my GE.World Monitor (1968 radio) and listen to SW. (by the way its a great radio! very sensitive)

> I know it was during the day, but I used to be able to pick stuff up even before sundown.

> When I try at night, there seems to nothing but more  interfence and hardly any programming other than religous programing and China. Whats happend to Radio Moscow? the BBC? radio Nederlands? Albania?

> Is Shortwave going away too? When the powers out ain't nothing gonna beat a radio.

> Your thoughts are appreciated.

> Thanks. Barry

Interesting thread here.

I have a house full of restored vacuum radios that have not been turned
on in years...Think I will have a listen tonight.

--
https://www.createspace.com/3707686

 
 
 

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by conkli » Wed, 27 Feb 2013 07:07:43


Quote:

> x-no-archive: yes

>>Will AM broadcast radio go the same way as SW? Will SW make a comeback?

> Good quality low cost receivers will keep SW alive. I just bought a
> Sony - ICF-SW7600GR and I love it, don't let the small size fool you. The
> world is a
> smaller place and people what to learn more about eachother and radio will
> always
> be a  more "user friendly" technology than the internet.

> FM is pretty much dead. Where are the stations that play country or
> standards
> or album sides or songs that weren't released as singels ? New York's
> 1071ThePeak.com is independatatly owned, they're pretty good.

> I want to hear Alice's Restaurant !!!

> I think there will always be a place for shows like Coast to Coast AM.

> My 1950 Emerson 8 tube AM/FM receiver is my favorite piece of technology.
> I through out my Polaroid camera when they stopped making film for it.
> I'm perfectly happy with Widows XP and Office 2000.
> I own laser disks and have to remember to convert them to DVD before the
> LD player breaks.
> I don't own a DVR, my high end JVC VCR works just fine thank you very
> much.
> I still have my LPs even though I can't remember where I put the
> turntable, I think it's in the closet behind
> the 4 pairs of shoes that make my feet hurt.

 I tried listening to shortwave a few years ago and mostly found screaming
evangelists.  When BBC stopped broadcasting to North America, and then the
Intenet came along, I put the receivers away and listen to the Internet for
radio reception.
 
 
 

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by conkli » Wed, 27 Feb 2013 07:18:45



Quote:

> Hello, The other day I decided to use my GE.World Monitor (1968 radio) and
> listen to SW. (by the way its a great radio! very sensitive) I know it was
> during the day, but I used to be able to pick stuff up even before
> sundown. When I try at night, there seems to nothing but more interfence
> and hardly any programming other than religous programing and China. Whats
> happend to Radio Moscow? the BBC? radio Nederlands? Albania? Is Shortwave
> going away too? When the powers out ain't nothing gonna beat a radio. Your
> thoughts are appreciated. Thanks. Barry

My house is overflowing with restored tube radios and 3000 vinyl
jazz-swing-blues records..(my son only buys 78s!) I have an FM transmitter
connected to my pc, an AM transmitter connected to my Stereo Amp. We listen
to all of our music on the radios.

In my living room, I have a restored 1941 RCA 29K console radio. My aunt
gave it to me when I was 15 in 1970, I've been caring for it ever since.

Long live old Tech!!!

================

Ok, folks, you want old-tech?  This group originally had a phonograph
section, but it ceased.  Right now I am listening to my Edison Long Play
phonograph.  Yes, there were only 12 LPs made, in 1926.  And just a few
thousand players.  But they were so well made, they still work.   I have a
40 minute record playing, one of the few 12" records he made.  Edison was
just too far ahead of his time, with 400 grooves per inch at 80 rpm.  That
is twice as fine as a modern LP.  Radio was just getting started then.

 
 
 

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by Joe Bent » Wed, 27 Feb 2013 09:15:16



Quote:

> I want to hear Alice's Restaurant !!!

Every Thanksgiving on most any Community Radio station I've ever
listened to.  :-)

Joe

 
 
 

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by Michael Blac » Wed, 27 Feb 2013 09:59:53


Quote:


>> I want to hear Alice's Restaurant !!!

> Every Thanksgiving on most any Community Radio station I've ever
> listened to. :-)

He was here in December of 1996, just him and his band (but his son Abe
was in the band) and that was soon after the show he was on, "Byrds of
Paradise" was cancelled.  But it was also the period when he seemed to be
circulating the notion that the 18 minute gap in the Nixon tape was
because Alice's Restaurant had been in that gap, and erased.  I don't know
whether he'd been doing that schtick before that, but by the time he came
back, 2009, he either didn't mention it or it was just in passing  (while
in 1996, it was a major story he was telling).

When he was here in 2009, a week after my fiftieth birthday, he brought
his children and grandchildren, so everyone performed. He didn't get much
time, he seemed to content to sit on stage and be the patriarch of the
family.

(So of the three times I've seen him, only in 1996 did he get the full
concert, in 1985 he came with Pete Seeger).

And then I realized that he was doing something Woody never got to to, do
grow old and watch the kids grow up.  The weird thing was he was 62 in
2009, three years older than Pete Seeger was when I saw him first in 1978.
Yet Pete seemed old in 78, and just got older, while Arlo still looks
young (relatively speaking, he sure looks older than he does in
"Woodstock".

There were a bunch of books about Woody last year, it being the hundredth
anniversary of his birth.  But just a few weeks ago an interesting book
hit the shelves (I can't remember the title), it's a novel written by
Woody and never published before.  I glanced at it, can't decide if I
shoud grab it in hardcover (something I pretty much never do) or wait till
paperback.  It similar in style to Bound For Glory and Seeds of Man which
was published about 1976,  but doesn't seem to include any reality (unlike
the other two).

Woody didnt' get to radio till the late thirties, but it was still the
time of sponsored shows and each show having a personality connected with
it.

I also notice, but haven't grabbed it, that archives.org has a radio
recording of Woody and Leadbelly from some New York City radio station
that might be interesting.

   Michael

 
 
 

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by conkli » Wed, 27 Feb 2013 11:38:23



Quote:

>> I want to hear Alice's Restaurant !!!

> Every Thanksgiving on most any Community Radio station I've ever listened
> to.  :-)

> Joe

Do you have Alice's Restaurant: The Multicolored Rainbow Roach Incident?
 
 
 

WHAT"S HAPPENING TO SHORTWAVE RADIO?

Post by . » Wed, 27 Feb 2013 12:33:47



Quote:



>>> I want to hear Alice's Restaurant !!!

>> Every Thanksgiving on most any Community Radio station I've ever listened
>> to.  :-)

>> Joe

> Do you have Alice's Restaurant: The Multicolored Rainbow Roach Incident?

FWIW, I saw Arlo last year, he is a far better entertainer now than when
he was new to Alice and the restaurant, and the 27 eight by ten color
photographs with circles and arrows and a paragraph on the back of each
one to be used as .....