These old tubes are a real TRIP...

These old tubes are a real TRIP...

Post by Brenda Dye » Tue, 29 Jan 2013 23:21:23



I'm working on a Radiola 26 (third one I've picked up). It had a full
compliment of burned out tubes when it got here, plus the 2uF cap was as
leaky as could be. After replacing the cap, and doing all the continuity
tests on the catacomb, I got to scrounging up enough tubes to test it out.

At first, I could find only four that were usable, but that was enough to
see if the battery and volume pots were working properly. Later, I found one
more tube that I had reglued the base on, that was questionable.

Putting that tube in, I plugged a speaker into the headphone jacks (since
the first AF tube drives the phones). The radio crackled to life, with very
good sensitivity and not bad selectivity, albeit low and distorted volume. I
just wish these radios would tune past 1300 or so..

Well, tired of listening to the low volume from the headphone outputs, I
thought I would try a tube I KNEW to be bad in the final (2nd AF) socket.
The reason I know this tube to be bad is that it's gassy as
aitch-eee-double-toothpicks (almost all of the getter flash is now white and
powdery from the air).

Imagine my total surprise when I connected the speaker to the output lugs
and actually got a decent loud and much less distorted audio! I'm just
waiting for the filament to finally melt open on that tube, but it's a total
blast to see it actually functioning as an amplifier in that condition!

Good thing I've bought more UV-199's.. will be interesting to see how much
better it performs with an intact tube.

 
 
 

These old tubes are a real TRIP...

Post by Michael Blac » Wed, 30 Jan 2013 00:28:20


Quote:

> Well, tired of listening to the low volume from the headphone outputs, I
> thought I would try a tube I KNEW to be bad in the final (2nd AF) socket. The
> reason I know this tube to be bad is that it's gassy as
> aitch-eee-double-toothpicks (almost all of the getter flash is now white and
> powdery from the air).

> Imagine my total surprise when I connected the speaker to the output lugs and
> actually got a decent loud and much less distorted audio! I'm just waiting
> for the filament to finally melt open on that tube, but it's a total blast to
> see it actually functioning as an amplifier in that condition!

That's why it's hard to throw things away. Either you think you might be
able to make use of it in the future (if nothing else, the tube base might
be used somewhere else) or "Maybe it's not really bad".  It's safer to be
sorry than to toss out something that might still have some life in it.

Of course, sometimes I've tested things planning to junk the bad ones,
only to get them mixed up again so I give up.

    Michael

 
 
 

These old tubes are a real TRIP...

Post by oldcoot7.. » Wed, 30 Jan 2013 00:52:53


Brenda,
Check this out.. http://www.sparkbangbuzz.com/els/vt-vac-el.htm

Also the guy's home page.

Bill(oc)

 
 
 

These old tubes are a real TRIP...

Post by Michael A. Terrel » Wed, 30 Jan 2013 01:39:19


Quote:


> > Well, tired of listening to the low volume from the headphone outputs, I
> > thought I would try a tube I KNEW to be bad in the final (2nd AF) socket. The
> > reason I know this tube to be bad is that it's gassy as
> > aitch-eee-double-toothpicks (almost all of the getter flash is now white and
> > powdery from the air).

> > Imagine my total surprise when I connected the speaker to the output lugs and
> > actually got a decent loud and much less distorted audio! I'm just waiting
> > for the filament to finally melt open on that tube, but it's a total blast to
> > see it actually functioning as an amplifier in that condition!

> That's why it's hard to throw things away. Either you think you might be
> able to make use of it in the future (if nothing else, the tube base might
> be used somewhere else) or "Maybe it's not really bad".  It's safer to be
> sorry than to toss out something that might still have some life in it.

> Of course, sometimes I've tested things planning to junk the bad ones,
> only to get them mixed up again so I give up.

>     Michael

   That's why I put a tiny dot of red paint on tested items. It is the
least used color on what I worked on, and I used a specific spot to
reduce the chances of mixing good with bad again. I used to use the
point of a straight pin or medium needle.  Now, I have a steady supply
of used insulin syringes to apply the paint before I clip the needles &
dispose of them.

   I had one 'customer' try to rip me off years ago. He wanted an
estimate.  I found the problem, and marked the parts I'd tested.  A week
later he refused the estimate, so I gave it back.  A week after that he
stormed into the meeting and started yelling, You stupid bastard!  I
replaced every part you marked bad and it still doesn't work.  I smiled
and told him I didn't mark bad parts, only good ones.  He started
screaming that if they were good, I had to use green.  I told him red
was my favorite color so I used it.  Everyone in the club started
laughing as he stormed out of the meeting, and never came back.

   Another reason I picked red was I had over a dozen bottles of red
Testor's enamel model paint that I bought for ten cents each when
Zayre's went bankrupt.

 
 
 

These old tubes are a real TRIP...

Post by philo » Wed, 30 Jan 2013 01:41:07



Quote:



>>> Well, tired of listening to the low volume from the headphone outputs, I
>>> thought I would try a tube I KNEW to be bad in the final (2nd AF) socket. The
>>> reason I know this tube to be bad is that it's gassy as
>>> aitch-eee-double-toothpicks (almost all of the getter flash is now white and
>>> powdery from the air).

>>> Imagine my total surprise when I connected the speaker to the output lugs and
>>> actually got a decent loud and much less distorted audio! I'm just waiting
>>> for the filament to finally melt open on that tube, but it's a total blast to
>>> see it actually functioning as an amplifier in that condition!

>> That's why it's hard to throw things away. Either you think you might be
>> able to make use of it in the future (if nothing else, the tube base might
>> be used somewhere else) or "Maybe it's not really bad".  It's safer to be
>> sorry than to toss out something that might still have some life in it.

>> Of course, sometimes I've tested things planning to junk the bad ones,
>> only to get them mixed up again so I give up.

>>      Michael

>     That's why I put a tiny dot of red paint on tested items. It is the
> least used color on what I worked on, and I used a specific spot to
> reduce the chances of mixing good with bad again. I used to use the
> point of a straight pin or medium needle.  Now, I have a steady supply
> of used insulin syringes to apply the paint before I clip the needles &
> dispose of them.

>     I had one 'customer' try to rip me off years ago. He wanted an
> estimate.  I found the problem, and marked the parts I'd tested.  A week
> later he refused the estimate, so I gave it back.  A week after that he
> stormed into the meeting and started yelling, You stupid bastard!  I
> replaced every part you marked bad and it still doesn't work.  I smiled
> and told him I didn't mark bad parts, only good ones.  He started
> screaming that if they were good, I had to use green.  I told him red
> was my favorite color so I used it.  Everyone in the club started
> laughing as he stormed out of the meeting, and never came back.

Great story!!!!
 
 
 

These old tubes are a real TRIP...

Post by John Robertso » Wed, 30 Jan 2013 04:13:27


Quote:

> Brenda,
> Check this out.. http://www.sparkbangbuzz.com/els/vt-vac-el.htm

> Also the guy's home page.

> Bill(oc)

Great stuff, have you heard about collectors who rebuild their old
vacuum tubes? All you need is some glass experience and something to
become the filament and getter and you have a shot at rebuilding many of
the old tubes that had large enough elements for human handling...

Man there are times I wish I was a twin or triplet! Cloning anyone?

John :-#)#
--
    (Please post followups or tech enquiries to the newsgroup)
  John's Jukes Ltd. 2343 Main St., Vancouver, BC, Canada V5T 3C9
  Call (604)872-5757 or Fax 872-2010 (Pinballs, Jukes, Video Games)
                     www.flippers.com
       "Old pinballers never die, they just flip out."

 
 
 

These old tubes are a real TRIP...

Post by Michael Blac » Wed, 30 Jan 2013 07:17:51


Quote:


>> Brenda, Check this out.. http://www.sparkbangbuzz.com/els/vt-vac-el.htm

>> Also the guy's home page.
>> Bill(oc)

> Great stuff, have you heard about collectors who rebuild their old vacuum
> tubes? All you need is some glass experience and something to become the
> filament and getter and you have a shot at rebuilding many of the old tubes
> that had large enough elements for human handling...

> Man there are times I wish I was a twin or triplet! Cloning anyone?

It's probably easier to work on the earliest tubes with all that space
than miniature or subminiature tubes.

I saw recently, again, a reference to something on the internet where
someone builds their own tubes.  The problem with the internet is that it
generally has such a short memory.  There was an article in QST in 1964
(it popped up here a couple of months ago but then got buried again before
I posted about it) where someone in South America was building his own
tubes.  Some were his own design, some were clones, they all were mostly
power tubes, which again has the benefit of more working room.  And in
1964, there was something in building power tubes, while the average
receiving tube was so common it likely wasn't worth it.  He blew his own
glass.

I don't think building your own tubes was ever a common thing, but I
suspect most of the information readily available dates from the early
days. Back then it meant something, need if nothing else, while later
things became more available.  There was a time, apparently, when people
made their own quartz crystals (for controlling frequency) by taking a
piece of quarts and starting from scratch.  That's the sort of information
that isn't there in the current books.

   Michael

 
 
 

These old tubes are a real TRIP...

Post by Paul » Wed, 30 Jan 2013 11:09:04



Quote:


>>> Brenda, Check this out.. http://www.sparkbangbuzz.com/els/vt-vac-el.htm

>>> Also the guy's home page. Bill(oc)

>> Great stuff, have you heard about collectors who rebuild their old vacuum
>> tubes? All you need is some glass experience and something to become the
>> filament and getter and you have a shot at rebuilding many of the old
>> tubes that had large enough elements for human handling...

>> Man there are times I wish I was a twin or triplet! Cloning anyone?

> It's probably easier to work on the earliest tubes with all that space
> than miniature or subminiature tubes.

> I saw recently, again, a reference to something on the internet where
> someone builds their own tubes.  The problem with the internet is that it
> generally has such a short memory.  There was an article in QST in 1964
> (it popped up here a couple of months ago but then got buried again before
> I posted about it) where someone in South America was building his own
> tubes.  Some were his own design, some were clones, they all were mostly
> power tubes, which again has the benefit of more working room.  And in
> 1964, there was something in building power tubes, while the average
> receiving tube was so common it likely wasn't worth it.  He blew his own
> glass.

> I don't think building your own tubes was ever a common thing, but I
> suspect most of the information readily available dates from the early
> days. Back then it meant something, need if nothing else, while later
> things became more available.  There was a time, apparently, when people
> made their own quartz crystals (for controlling frequency) by taking a
> piece of quarts and starting from scratch.  That's the sort of information
> that isn't there in the current books.

>   Michael

I once found this guy in Hong Kong making audio tubes.  When I read the $ us
I nearly choked.

Paul

 
 
 

These old tubes are a real TRIP...

Post by Michael A. Terrel » Thu, 31 Jan 2013 08:15:22


Quote:




> >>> Well, tired of listening to the low volume from the headphone outputs, I
> >>> thought I would try a tube I KNEW to be bad in the final (2nd AF) socket. The
> >>> reason I know this tube to be bad is that it's gassy as
> >>> aitch-eee-double-toothpicks (almost all of the getter flash is now white and
> >>> powdery from the air).

> >>> Imagine my total surprise when I connected the speaker to the output lugs and
> >>> actually got a decent loud and much less distorted audio! I'm just waiting
> >>> for the filament to finally melt open on that tube, but it's a total blast to
> >>> see it actually functioning as an amplifier in that condition!

> >> That's why it's hard to throw things away. Either you think you might be
> >> able to make use of it in the future (if nothing else, the tube base might
> >> be used somewhere else) or "Maybe it's not really bad".  It's safer to be
> >> sorry than to toss out something that might still have some life in it.

> >> Of course, sometimes I've tested things planning to junk the bad ones,
> >> only to get them mixed up again so I give up.

> >>      Michael

> >     That's why I put a tiny dot of red paint on tested items. It is the
> > least used color on what I worked on, and I used a specific spot to
> > reduce the chances of mixing good with bad again. I used to use the
> > point of a straight pin or medium needle.  Now, I have a steady supply
> > of used insulin syringes to apply the paint before I clip the needles &
> > dispose of them.

> >     I had one 'customer' try to rip me off years ago. He wanted an
> > estimate.  I found the problem, and marked the parts I'd tested.  A week
> > later he refused the estimate, so I gave it back.  A week after that he
> > stormed into the meeting and started yelling, You stupid bastard!  I
> > replaced every part you marked bad and it still doesn't work.  I smiled
> > and told him I didn't mark bad parts, only good ones.  He started
> > screaming that if they were good, I had to use green.  I told him red
> > was my favorite color so I used it.  Everyone in the club started
> > laughing as he stormed out of the meeting, and never came back.

> Great story!!!!

   Thanks.  Another attempt to cheat was at a TV shop in the '70s. A
couple brought in a large, dead B&W portable. It had an open fuse
resistor, & a shorted diode in the doubler. They OKed the repair by
phone and picked it up that night. They came back a few days later,
claiming that it had quit again.  The same tech opened the set to find
that it was as full of dust bunnies as the first time and no new parts.
He took the bad parts out of the bag they had broght and showed them
that it wasn't the same TV.  They claimed that they had two identical
TVS, and had mixed them up.  No kids in the house, just two ***s.
Yeah, right.
 
 
 

These old tubes are a real TRIP...

Post by philo » Thu, 31 Jan 2013 23:41:32



Quote:
>d one.

>> I have a good friend who used to run a TV repair shop...
>> he told me all kinds of amazing stories and how he struggled to make a
>> living.

>> He decided to give it up and go into industrial equipment repair

>> This is what he is up to today:

>> http://www.tdlelectronics.com/

>     I left TV repair for the same field in the late '70s. Then I moved
> back to TV broadcast engineering.  When I could no longer handle
> climbing towers & ladders I went to computer repair at the component
> level. My last job before having to file for disability was building
> Telemetry equipment for the aerospace industry.

I was in the industrial battery and charger business until I had to have
my knees replaced. I had planned to go 40 years on the job but only made
it to 38. Getting disability was not a problem though.

I now do computer repair and of course tube radio repair.

--
https://www.createspace.com/3707686

 
 
 

These old tubes are a real TRIP...

Post by HagstA » Fri, 01 Feb 2013 08:39:43



Quote:

> I saw recently, again, a reference to something on the internet where
> someone builds their own tubes.  The problem with the internet is that it
> generally has such a short memory.

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=homemade+vacuum+tubes&oq=...

John H.

 
 
 

These old tubes are a real TRIP...

Post by John Byrn » Sun, 03 Feb 2013 06:07:05




<snip>

Quote:
> I have a good friend who used to run a TV repair shop...
> he told me all kinds of amazing stories and how he struggled to make a
> living.

> He decided to give it up and go into industrial equipment repair

> This is what he is up to today:

> http://www.tdlelectronics.com/

Interesting, the TDL Electronics "Solar Barn" isn't far from North Cape.

--
Regards,

John Byrns

Surf my web pages at,  http://fmamradios.com/