fa: discussion about some interesting parts, a very old answering machine and older capacitors

fa: discussion about some interesting parts, a very old answering machine and older capacitors

Post by Jeffrey Angu » Wed, 21 Jul 2010 02:37:59




Quote:
> see here http://www.phonetel.com/html/hashimoto.html for some history on
> this device and its inventor. This is the first commercially available
> answering machine in the USA - prior to that, only a service was
> available, not a device for purchase.

This was worth it just for the link.

Quote:
> And now, the highly valued ebay links
> Realistic TRC-9a CB Xcvr, 1972,

Well, it IS 38 years old now. Still doesn't belong here.

Quote:
> Roanwell Bakelite Police style handset PTT 1951

Ahhh, ancient Motorola two-way VHF stuff. Now THAT additional
link was also well worth the intrusion. (Especially, if like me,
you have a soft spot for old Motorola two-way stuff.)

Quote:
> 3 gang variable capacitor w/trimmers DejurAmsco Corp
> Pearlco variable capacitor condenser 1920s bakelite

Debatable, but usable parts.

Jeff

 
 
 

fa: discussion about some interesting parts, a very old answering machine and older capacitors

Post by Phil Nelso » Wed, 21 Jul 2010 21:43:17


Quote:
> and now the ineffective screaming - let it begin

In the Internet no one can hear you scream.

Phil Nelson

 
 
 

fa: discussion about some interesting parts, a very old answering machine and older capacitors

Post by Michael A. Terrel » Thu, 22 Jul 2010 02:51:20


Quote:

> > and now the ineffective screaming - let it begin

> In the Internet no one can hear you scream.

   Even if only dogs can hear you. :)

--
Anyone wanting to run for any political office in the US should have to
have a DD214, and a honorable discharge.

 
 
 

fa: discussion about some interesting parts, a very old answering machine and older capacitors

Post by Greg » Thu, 22 Jul 2010 05:11:27



Quote:


>> > and now the ineffective screaming - let it begin

>> In the Internet no one can hear you scream.

>   Even if only dogs can hear you. :)

Hmmmm, on Usenet no one can hear you scream.

There must be a way to fix that. Can't be too hard ???

greg

 
 
 

fa: discussion about some interesting parts, a very old answering machine and older capacitors

Post by Registered Use » Thu, 22 Jul 2010 06:31:18


On Tue, 20 Jul 2010 13:51:20 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

Quote:


>> > and now the ineffective screaming - let it begin

>> In the Internet no one can hear you scream.

>   Even if only dogs can hear you. :)

"On the Internet no one knows you're dog" (caption of a New Yorker
cartoon from the last millenium). Of course if one chooses to act as a
dog on the Internet all bets are off.
 
 
 

fa: discussion about some interesting parts, a very old answering machine and older capacitors

Post by William Sommerwerc » Thu, 22 Jul 2010 07:18:30


Quote:
> "On the Internet no one knows you're dog" (caption of a New
> Yorker cartoon from the last millenium). Of course if one
> chooses to act as a dog on the Internet all bets are off.

And by the same token, no one might know that you're actually a fairly nice
person. Anonymous postings seem to bring out the worst in people.
 
 
 

fa: discussion about some interesting parts, a very old answering machine and older capacitors

Post by Bill Nobl » Thu, 22 Jul 2010 12:56:44



Quote:
>> and now the ineffective screaming - let it begin

> In the Internet no one can hear you scream.

> Phil Nelson

really?
http://resources.bravenet.com/audio_clips/sound_effects/female_voice_...
 
 
 

fa: discussion about some interesting parts, a very old answering machine and older capacitors

Post by Bill Nobl » Fri, 23 Jul 2010 13:56:06


you know, I'd still like to see a photo of the complete original unit and
how it was to be set up - for example, how did it answer the phone?
mechanically?  there seems to be no phone connection to it

 
 
 

fa: discussion about some interesting parts, a very old answering machine and older capacitors

Post by Terry » Fri, 23 Jul 2010 20:53:48



Quote:
> you know, I'd still like to see a photo of the complete original unit and
> how it was to be set up - for example, how did it answer the phone?
> mechanically? ?there seems to be no phone connection to it

We had an early answering machine -- Maybe Record-a-Call brand. It had
a cradle that went between the phone and the handset on the standard
desk phone. I can't recall exactly, but I believe it lifted the
handset to answer the phone. Seems to me it used some proprietary???
cartridge tape system for the outgoing message and incoming messages.
It would rewind to the beginning of the tape to play the outgoing
message, then fast forward until it found a "marker" on the tape, at
which point it would  record the incoming message. So if there were a
bunch of messages already recorded ahead of yours, you had to wait
quite a while to record your message. If you lost power, the machine
lost track of how many markers to look for, so incoming messages got
recorded over. It was a touchy machine, I remember repairing it many
times, as a kid.

I recall later systems using standard audio cassettes and of course,
later, micro cassettes.

 
 
 

fa: discussion about some interesting parts, a very old answering machine and older capacitors

Post by Bill Nobl » Sat, 24 Jul 2010 12:50:45



Quote:

>> you know, I'd still like to see a photo of the complete original unit and
>> how it was to be set up - for example, how did it answer the phone?
>> mechanically?  there seems to be no phone connection to it

> We had an early answering machine -- Maybe Record-a-Call brand. It had
> a cradle that went between the phone and the handset on the standard
> desk phone. I can't recall exactly, but I believe it lifted the
> handset to answer the phone. Seems to me it used some proprietary???
> cartridge tape system for the outgoing message and incoming messages.
> It would rewind to the beginning of the tape to play the outgoing
> message, then fast forward until it found a "marker" on the tape, at
> which point it would  record the incoming message. So if there were a
> bunch of messages already recorded ahead of yours, you had to wait
> quite a while to record your message. If you lost power, the machine
> lost track of how many markers to look for, so incoming messages got
> recorded over. It was a touchy machine, I remember repairing it many
> times, as a kid.

> I recall later systems using standard audio cassettes and of course,
> later, micro cassettes.

Well, this thing is older than the Record-a-Call - it has a single
continuous loop 3 minute cartridge for the incoming calls, and a length of
unpackaged tape in the serpentine arrangement (visible in the original
picture) that held the outgoing message - a strip of conductive material let
it know when the serpentine tape had returned to the starting position.
There is no obvious way for it to lift the receiver, at the back, on the top
is a three pin connection marked "line", and a miniature phone jack marked
"mic", at the front are two miniature phone jacks, marked monitor and ext
spk.  I suppose it is possible that the "line" connector was wired into the
phone some how.  I haven't been able to find any photo of this early model
installed in an operational configuration, finding such a photo would
probably answer my questions.  or finding a copy of a manual to download.
 
 
 

fa: discussion about some interesting parts, a very old answering machine and older capacitors

Post by Bill Nobl » Sat, 24 Jul 2010 13:13:19


so I found a photo of the thing in operation, but of course it doesn't
answer the question, see

http://www.maigh.com/photos/ansafone.jpg

how did this thing actually answer the phone?


Quote:




>>> you know, I'd still like to see a photo of the complete original unit
>>> and
>>> how it was to be set up - for example, how did it answer the phone?
>>> mechanically?  there seems to be no phone connection to it

>> We had an early answering machine -- Maybe Record-a-Call brand. It had
>> a cradle that went between the phone and the handset on the standard
>> desk phone. I can't recall exactly, but I believe it lifted the
>> handset to answer the phone. Seems to me it used some proprietary???
>> cartridge tape system for the outgoing message and incoming messages.
>> It would rewind to the beginning of the tape to play the outgoing
>> message, then fast forward until it found a "marker" on the tape, at
>> which point it would  record the incoming message. So if there were a
>> bunch of messages already recorded ahead of yours, you had to wait
>> quite a while to record your message. If you lost power, the machine
>> lost track of how many markers to look for, so incoming messages got
>> recorded over. It was a touchy machine, I remember repairing it many
>> times, as a kid.

>> I recall later systems using standard audio cassettes and of course,
>> later, micro cassettes.

> Well, this thing is older than the Record-a-Call - it has a single
> continuous loop 3 minute cartridge for the incoming calls, and a length of
> unpackaged tape in the serpentine arrangement (visible in the original
> picture) that held the outgoing message - a strip of conductive material
> let it know when the serpentine tape had returned to the starting
> position. There is no obvious way for it to lift the receiver, at the
> back, on the top is a three pin connection marked "line", and a miniature
> phone jack marked "mic", at the front are two miniature phone jacks,
> marked monitor and ext spk.  I suppose it is possible that the "line"
> connector was wired into the phone some how.  I haven't been able to find
> any photo of this early model installed in an operational configuration,
> finding such a photo would probably answer my questions.  or finding a
> copy of a manual to download.

 
 
 

fa: discussion about some interesting parts, a very old answering machine and older capacitors

Post by Jeffrey Angu » Sat, 24 Jul 2010 14:13:49



Quote:
> so I found a photo of the thing in operation, but of course it doesn't
> answer the question, see

> http://www.maigh.com/photos/ansafone.jpg

> how did this thing actually answer the phone?

Via the "line" connection. It goes "off hook" and
proceeds to play the outgoing message, record the
incoming message and finally goes back "on hook"
when finished.

There was a few lawsuits involved in forcing the
telephone company to allow consumers to attach
things to the telephone lines.

Prior to that, there was an acoustic coupler and
a mechanical solenoid to press/lift on the hook
switch button on the telephone itself.

Jeff

 
 
 

fa: discussion about some interesting parts, a very old answering machine and older capacitors

Post by Rand » Sun, 25 Jul 2010 01:00:33


On Thu, 22 Jul 2010 21:13:19 -0700, "Bill Noble"

Quote:

>how did this thing actually answer the phone?

I don't know about that specific unit - but the original AnsaFone
literally picked up the hand set via a couple of stiff wires operated
by a solenoid. There was a speaker in the base to "squawk" at the
mouth piece - and a microphone that attached to the hand set's
earpiece.

The easiest way to track down specifics on something like that (and
that old) is to chase the patents - which most are on-line.  One of
the AnsaFone patents is 3,376,390  - you can go to the US Patent
Office website and look it up. The drawing clearly shows the lift
mechanism, etc.

best regards...
rg