possible solution to radio glitches

possible solution to radio glitches

Post by Domagoj B » Thu, 17 Aug 2000 04:00:00



I read this article on the web, so I am not the author :

The header and tuned pipe are usually joined with a flexible coupling of
mostly heat-resistant flexible tubing. The coupling has little to do with
the effectiveness of the pipe, unless it fails prematurely or it has not
been properly installed. The best installation has only a slight gap between
the header and the pipe. This ensures smoother exhaust flow and avoids
exposing the coupling to excessively high temperatures. == Be careful not to
allow the pipe and header to touch each other, however, as the vibration
will cause minor damage to both. The real puzzler is that I have also seen
this metal-to-metal high-frequency vibration cause radio interference. Yup;
for some reason, when the two pieces of metal rub together, it can cause the
radio to glitch. ==

--
Domagoj Babic

         ICQ # : 83959589
--

 
 
 

possible solution to radio glitches

Post by Redwol » Thu, 17 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Hmm, I was under the impression that the coupler not only joined the pipe to
the header but also allowed some tunability by allowing you to slightly
adjust the overall length of the pipe.  Most couplers are able to deal with
the heat, and it only costs a few bux to get the "pro" couplers, which can
tolerate the added heat for sure.


Quote:
> I read this article on the web, so I am not the author :

> The header and tuned pipe are usually joined with a flexible coupling of
> mostly heat-resistant flexible tubing. The coupling has little to do with
> the effectiveness of the pipe, unless it fails prematurely or it has not
> been properly installed. The best installation has only a slight gap
between
> the header and the pipe. This ensures smoother exhaust flow and avoids
> exposing the coupling to excessively high temperatures. == Be careful not
to
> allow the pipe and header to touch each other, however, as the vibration
> will cause minor damage to both. The real puzzler is that I have also seen
> this metal-to-metal high-frequency vibration cause radio interference.
Yup;
> for some reason, when the two pieces of metal rub together, it can cause
the
> radio to glitch. ==

> --
> Domagoj Babic

>          ICQ # : 83959589
> --