Wire guage question

Wire guage question

Post by THUND » Sat, 20 Feb 1999 04:00:00



Yesterday I went to get new wire for my TAO3-F and they were out of
the 12 guage wire (Big races coming up, so everything is hard to get)
all the store had was 14 guage.  

My question is this... How is this going to affect my car?  I have a
Midnight 2 Pro and a Cyclone and a good matched set of 2000s.

I am not very techie, but the salesperson said something about
increased resistance but less weight.  I know the second part is good,
but what about the first?

Thanks

THUNDER

 
 
 

Wire guage question

Post by Tom » Sat, 20 Feb 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> Yesterday I went to get new wire for my TAO3-F and they were out of
> the 12 guage wire (Big races coming up, so everything is hard to get)
> all the store had was 14 guage.  

Lemme guess.  You went to your LHS to get the real nice ultra-flexy
sillicone insulated wire that costs way too much that you're always
running out of?

Quote:
> My question is this... How is this going to affect my car?  I have a
> Midnight 2 Pro and a Cyclone and a good matched set of 2000s.

You'll go slower.  Not much, not noticably, but slower.

Quote:
> I am not very techie, but the salesperson said something about
> increased resistance but less weight.  I know the second part is good,
> but what about the first?

Well, more resistance is bad, more weight is bad.  Let's just look some of
this stuff up in this here handy pocket refrence.

Your car probably has about 1 foot of positive, and 1 foot of negative
wire (I'm over-estimating, so the difference is even more pronounced).  So
12 gague wire would give you a total of 0.00324 ohms of resistance in the
wire alone, and 14 gague wire would give you 0.00516 ohms of resistance in
the wire alone.  That's not a whole heck of a lot.  Let's say your motor
draws 20 amperes (it'll do that when accelerating) -- that's about 0.1
volt drop through your wires for the 14 gague wire and about 0.05 volt
drop for the 12 gague wire.  In short, the 14 gague wire is definately
adequate, but will theoretically cause your car to be slower because of
increased electrical resistance.  Now let's look at weight.  The 12 gague
wire (without insulation -- that's not in this handbook) will weigh
0.0396 lb for the two feet, and the 14 gague wire will weigh 0.0248 lb for
the two feet.  That's 0.6336 oz for the 12 gague wire and 0.3968 oz for
the 14 gague wire.

So using 14 gague wire will get you a net savings of 0.2368 oz. and will
cost you 0.00192 ohms resistance.  I don't know which is more significant
(I could try to calculate how much power it takes to accelerate 0.2368 oz.
and compare that with the power difference between the wires) but as you
can see, the difference is very small.  Just assume the insulation weighs
about the same as the wire (that's probably close) and you can see that
it's a small difference in weight and a small difference in resistance.

Better yet, you'll psych everyone else there out using such inferior wire,
and they'll be impressed with your vastly superior driving capabilities
necessary to cover up such an extreme deficet.

___
TTTTT   OO   M   M The sixth sick shiek's sixth sheep's sick.   |~~~|

  T    O  O  M M M So if it is in or if it is on it is as it is,  *  
  T     OO   M   M        be it in or on.                        `-'

 
 
 

Wire guage question

Post by nailhea » Sat, 20 Feb 1999 04:00:00


The difference is not that great. Missing the line in one corner will
probably cost you more than what you lose in the lighter guage wire.

I personally use the 12 guage, but I feel that in and of itself, it won't
make a difference. But then, I go by the theory that a lot of little things
add up to make a difference. For instance, I use the heavier wire along with
making the length as short as possible, hard wire, and use a speed control
that has low on resistance. So, just maybe, everything together may make a
difference. Maybe.

Anyway, I think so and I guess that's all that counts.

Quote:
>Yesterday I went to get new wire for my TAO3-F and they were out of
>the 12 guage wire (Big races coming up, so everything is hard to get)
>all the store had was 14 guage.

>My question is this... How is this going to affect my car?  I have a
>Midnight 2 Pro and a Cyclone and a good matched set of 2000s.

>I am not very techie, but the salesperson said something about
>increased resistance but less weight.  I know the second part is good,
>but what about the first?

>Thanks

>THUNDER

 
 
 

Wire guage question

Post by Cliff Manle » Mon, 22 Feb 1999 04:00:00


would you listen to someone that can't even spell gauge??? (;-))
Quote:


>> Yesterday I went to get new wire for my TAO3-F and they were out of
>> the 12 guage wire (Big races coming up, so everything is hard to get)
>> all the store had was 14 guage.

>Lemme guess.  You went to your LHS to get the real nice ultra-flexy
>sillicone insulated wire that costs way too much that you're always
>running out of?

>> My question is this... How is this going to affect my car?  I have a
>> Midnight 2 Pro and a Cyclone and a good matched set of 2000s.

>You'll go slower.  Not much, not noticably, but slower.

>> I am not very techie, but the salesperson said something about
>> increased resistance but less weight.  I know the second part is good,
>> but what about the first?

>Well, more resistance is bad, more weight is bad.  Let's just look some of
>this stuff up in this here handy pocket refrence.

>Your car probably has about 1 foot of positive, and 1 foot of negative
>wire (I'm over-estimating, so the difference is even more pronounced).  So
>12 gague wire would give you a total of 0.00324 ohms of resistance in the
>wire alone, and 14 gague wire would give you 0.00516 ohms of resistance in
>the wire alone.  That's not a whole heck of a lot.  Let's say your motor
>draws 20 amperes (it'll do that when accelerating) -- that's about 0.1
>volt drop through your wires for the 14 gague wire and about 0.05 volt
>drop for the 12 gague wire.  In short, the 14 gague wire is definately
>adequate, but will theoretically cause your car to be slower because of
>increased electrical resistance.  Now let's look at weight.  The 12 gague
>wire (without insulation -- that's not in this handbook) will weigh
>0.0396 lb for the two feet, and the 14 gague wire will weigh 0.0248 lb for
>the two feet.  That's 0.6336 oz for the 12 gague wire and 0.3968 oz for
>the 14 gague wire.

>So using 14 gague wire will get you a net savings of 0.2368 oz. and will
>cost you 0.00192 ohms resistance.  I don't know which is more significant
>(I could try to calculate how much power it takes to accelerate 0.2368 oz.
>and compare that with the power difference between the wires) but as you
>can see, the difference is very small.  Just assume the insulation weighs
>about the same as the wire (that's probably close) and you can see that
>it's a small difference in weight and a small difference in resistance.

>Better yet, you'll psych everyone else there out using such inferior wire,
>and they'll be impressed with your vastly superior driving capabilities
>necessary to cover up such an extreme deficet.

>___
>TTTTT   OO   M   M The sixth sick shiek's sixth sheep's sick.   |~~~|

>  T    O  O  M M M So if it is in or if it is on it is as it is,  *
>  T     OO   M   M        be it in or on.                        `-'

 
 
 

Wire guage question

Post by PaulO575 » Mon, 22 Feb 1999 04:00:00


<snip>

Quote:
>>Better yet, you'll psych everyone else there out using such inferior wire,
>>and they'll be impressed with your vastly superior driving capabilities
>>necessary to cover up such an extreme deficet.

This is off topic, but the psych out factor can be used to your advantage and
can be a lot of fun too.

 A previous employer of mine used to go out to the sand drags at Pismo.  He
used to tell me that he would purposely deflate his tires knowing that this was
the WRONG thing to do for track conditions and knowing that other racers would
do the same thing when they observed him releasing air; monkey-see,
monkey-do..... He'd go back and put air back in his tires immediately before
his run and then stand back and watch others scramble for air...

Just for laughs, he'd pull his carb between runs for no reason, and bolt it
back on  just to watch all the other racers pull there carbs.