Radio voltage vs. range

Radio voltage vs. range

Post by Dan Cha » Sun, 11 Apr 1999 04:00:00



Does a radio have better range when the batteries are new? Is it
noticable? If I use 9 or 10 cells vs. 8 (nicads, that is) would the
range be noticable increased?
 
 
 

Radio voltage vs. range

Post by Antonio Garz » Sun, 11 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Hopefully the radio has a regulator in it. So it won't matter if you
put more voltage.  If it is a linear reg. then you'll be wasting energy
and heating up excessively.

If it doesn't have a regulator you might cause the RF components
to be biased at an incorrect point which could cause excessive
distortion or reduced power.

I wouldn't try it.

Quote:

> Does a radio have better range when the batteries are new? Is it
> noticable? If I use 9 or 10 cells vs. 8 (nicads, that is) would the
> range be noticable increased?


 
 
 

Radio voltage vs. range

Post by Tom » Mon, 12 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> Does a radio have better range when the batteries are new? Is it
> noticable? If I use 9 or 10 cells vs. 8 (nicads, that is) would the
> range be noticable increased?

Yes.  Depends on how dead they were in the comparison.  Probably
marginally.

___
TTTTT   OO   M   M The sixth sick shiek's sixth sheep's sick.   |~~~|

  T    O  O  M M M So if it is in or if it is on it is as it is,  *  
  T     OO   M   M        be it in or on.                        `-'

 
 
 

Radio voltage vs. range

Post by Tom » Mon, 12 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hopefully the radio has a regulator in it. So it won't matter if you
> put more voltage.  If it is a linear reg. then you'll be wasting energy
> and heating up excessively.

> If it doesn't have a regulator you might cause the RF components
> to be biased at an incorrect point which could cause excessive
> distortion or reduced power.

> I wouldn't try it.

Most radios are designed to run on 8 1.5 volt alkalines, which is 12
volts, which is 10 NiCad cells.  No prob.

___
TTTTT   OO   M   M The sixth sick shiek's sixth sheep's sick.   |~~~|

  T    O  O  M M M So if it is in or if it is on it is as it is,  *  
  T     OO   M   M        be it in or on.                        `-'

 
 
 

Radio voltage vs. range

Post by Antonio Garz » Mon, 12 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:


> > Hopefully the radio has a regulator in it. So it won't matter if you
> > put more voltage.  If it is a linear reg. then you'll be wasting energy
> > and heating up excessively.

> > If it doesn't have a regulator you might cause the RF components
> > to be biased at an incorrect point which could cause excessive
> > distortion or reduced power.

> > I wouldn't try it.

> Most radios are designed to run on 8 1.5 volt alkalines, which is 12
> volts, which is 10 NiCad cells.  No prob.

OK.  But most are designed to also allow the use of NiCds.  That means
they probably won't take advantage of the extra voltage.  By that I mean
they probably have, say, a 9 volt regulator.  So the radio won't care if
it has 12 V or 9.6V powering it.

I'll have to open up my transmitter and I'll post what I see in there.

Antonio

 
 
 

Radio voltage vs. range

Post by Glen » Mon, 12 Apr 1999 04:00:00


I have noticed that when my XR2 drops below 10V that I start getting a
bit more glitchy on the track. I haven't run any significant tests
though.  One thing I have done to make sure that I have maximum voltage
available for each race is that I have started using the Alkaline
Renewal batteries and I recharge after each race.  This gives me over
1.5V per cell each time.  In some cases I've had around 13V on the
meter.  Instructions say you should recharge frequently and not wait
until they are discharged like the ni-cads.  Yes, they are more
expensive initially, but, I've already paid for them in not buying the
extra batteries.  Ni-cads are good for radios for low-cost
rechargability, but I think the new Renewal's are going to be better.
$.02 worth.
 
 
 

Radio voltage vs. range

Post by Hereman » Mon, 12 Apr 1999 04:00:00



Quote:
>Does a radio have better range when the batteries are new? Is it
>noticable? If I use 9 or 10 cells vs. 8 (nicads, that is) would the
>range be noticable increased?

A friend  of mine put 2 xtra nicads in (on) his transmitter. His range
increased and he didn't have any glitches anymore.
Some transmitters are designed to use 8 alkalines. Because nicads have
slightly less voltage, adding 1 or 2 won't hurt the transmitter.

Elvo

 
 
 

Radio voltage vs. range

Post by Tom » Mon, 12 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> > Most radios are designed to run on 8 1.5 volt alkalines, which is 12
> > volts, which is 10 NiCad cells.  No prob.

> OK.  But most are designed to also allow the use of NiCds.  That means
> they probably won't take advantage of the extra voltage.  By that I mean
> they probably have, say, a 9 volt regulator.  So the radio won't care if
> it has 12 V or 9.6V powering it.

I would think it be just as likely they would have a 12 volt regulator in
there, if they do have a regulator.

Quote:
> I'll have to open up my transmitter and I'll post what I see in there.

It would likely be different for different manufacturers.

___
TTTTT   OO   M   M The sixth sick shiek's sixth sheep's sick.   |~~~|

  T    O  O  M M M So if it is in or if it is on it is as it is,  *  
  T     OO   M   M        be it in or on.                        `-'