Wheel base for on-road cars

Wheel base for on-road cars

Post by pissed-.. » Tue, 24 Sep 1996 04:00:00



        Can anyone tell what the effect of a shorter wheel base compared to a
longer wheel base. I wen't to my first race saturday and did VERY lousy, main
reason being i would try to take the inner section of the oval track and would
end up on the outter by the time the turn ended. I'm driving a EV10ss and any
set-up tips would greatly be appraited for a oval track..

                                                                Thanks

 
 
 

Wheel base for on-road cars

Post by Rcmadman » Wed, 25 Sep 1996 04:00:00


There are alot of factors to consider and things that you can do to
improve your car performance.

First you want the weight to be on the front outside wheel and the rear
inside wheel.  Meaning when you take a allen wrench and lift up the rear
end, dead center of the car, the right wheel should lift about a 1/14 or
less before the left wheel starts to to lift.  The same goes for the front
but vice versa.  The front left wheel should lift before the right.

One other thing that can make a big difference in handling is tire
compound.  I personally prefer BSR radials.  Usually greens on the inside
and golds on the outside work real well.  When the temperature goes down
go to a green outside rear and stay with the gold outside front.  If the
track is real cold and the tires aren't heating up fast enough go to reds
on the inside.  If your track is vice versa, real hot weather and track is
warm, start with golds all the way around and work form there.  One other
thing you can try to help get the car around the turns better is go to a
narrow rear inside tire.  This accuatlly makes the car kinda of hook
around the turn. Warning: this tire doesn't work on very small tracks!

Now to go any farther I need to know some info from you:

What brand of tires do you run?
What springs do you have on the front end?
What springs do you have on the three rear shocks?
What is the banking on local your track?
What is the lenght of the racing groove?
What class are you running (motified, stock, etc.)?

A longer wheelbase car will do better on a bigger track and a shorter
wheelbase will do better on a smaller track.

Hope this helps, answer my questions and e-mail me.  I will be happy to
help you more with your set-up.

Anthony


 
 
 

Wheel base for on-road cars

Post by Douglas Mert » Thu, 26 Sep 1996 04:00:00


Longer wheelbase is usually harder to steer, and pushes more.  Shorter
wheelbase is easier to steer, runs looser.  This assumes all else is
equal.  Actually, I'm pretty sure that it's the width relative to the
length that's critical.
BTW, I'd guess that what you describe is related more to setup than wheel
length.  I raced oval for years, and it usually took me a couple of weeks
to figure out how to make the car handle the way I wanted it to on a new
track, or with a new car.  Go back for a few practice sessions, and find
out what works for you.
Hope this helps
DOC

 
 
 

Wheel base for on-road cars

Post by Richard Clea » Fri, 27 Sep 1996 04:00:00



writes:

Quote:

>There are alot of factors to consider and things that you can do to
>improve your car performance.

>First you want the weight to be on the front outside wheel and the
rear
>inside wheel.  Meaning when you take a allen wrench and lift up the
rear
>end, dead center of the car, the right wheel should lift about a 1/14
or
>less before the left wheel starts to to lift.  The same goes for the
front
>but vice versa.  The front left wheel should lift before the right.
>NOT TRUE!!! I ran a company that manufactured oval chassis and

sponsored a team for two years. We raced everything from indoor 170
foot high banks to flat tracks to velodromes. At no time did we run
corner weight biases that produced anything less than equal weight left
and right.Cars were fined tuned by tire stagger, unequal springs,
camber, chassis wedge and battery placement. Tweaking an oval car from
the rear is bad news. This causes directional instability on corner
exit. Our cars were always tweaked from the front of the car, and set
up so that both front tires touched at exactly the same time regardless
of wedge or stagger.
This must have worked; we won a state championship, two NORRCA series
championships, and many local races. Our car made the A main at four
consecutive Thunderdromes from 1991-1994.
I'm not slamming you. I just question your logic; have things changed
that radically in oval racing in the last two years?
<snip>>
Quote:
>A longer wheelbase car will do better on a bigger track and a shorter
>wheelbase will do better on a smaller track.

True, although our car (which had a 10 inch wheelbase) did quite well
on large tracks.
However, it is generally true that long wheelbase cars do not work
particularly well on short tracks.

Regards

Richard Cleary
"Team Reflex" (Reflex R/C Technologies, 1991-1994)

 
 
 

Wheel base for on-road cars

Post by Wayne Land » Fri, 27 Sep 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> Longer wheelbase is usually harder to steer, and pushes more.  Shorter
> wheelbase is easier to steer, runs looser.  This assumes all else is
> equal.  Actually, I'm pretty sure that it's the width relative to the
> length that's critical.
> BTW, I'd guess that what you describe is related more to setup than wheel
> length.  I raced oval for years, and it usually took me a couple of weeks
> to figure out how to make the car handle the way I wanted it to on a new
> track, or with a new car.  Go back for a few practice sessions, and find
> out what works for you.
> Hope this helps
> DOC

This can also be exactly opposite

some setup sheets say shorten the wheelbase/ moves more weight over the
rear axle line/ increases rear grip/ induces more understeer.

 
 
 

Wheel base for on-road cars

Post by AXOI » Sat, 05 Oct 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

>        Can anyone tell what the effect of a shorter wheel base compared to a
>longer wheel base. I wen't to my first race saturday and did VERY lousy, main
>reason being i would try to take the inner section of the oval track and would
>end up on the outter by the time the turn ended. I'm driving a EV10ss and any
>set-up tips would greatly be appraited for a oval track..

>                                                                Thanks

To answer your question is a short wheel base car will be more nimbile in the
turns but twitchy in the straits. A long wheel base car is the opposite, stable
in the straits and with less cutting ability in the turns. On setup, I would
say talk to other drivers at your track. Because each track is at least a
little different if not alot different and that meens different setups. The
drivers that know your track are your best recource.

Don't worry about last Saterday, talk to the other drivers, watch what they do,
what line they take around the track. Since it was your first race, the first
thing you need to learn is that you have a lot to learn. I have been racing 8
years and I am still learning (and relearning things I forgot). I hope you
remeber one other thing, allways allways allways have fun!

        Axoid

Remember the holy grail. "Practice"  :-)

 
 
 

Wheel base for on-road cars

Post by Ross Meye » Sat, 05 Oct 1996 04:00:00


It sound like your car has a front end "push", this has more to do with chassis
setup rather than length. Basically you need to increase the traction on the
front wheels, there's a couple ways to do this.

1. Move your battery slightly forward if you can.
2. Increase the camber on the right front wheel (tilt the top of the wheel in
toward the center of the car) and tilt the left front wheel out. It doesn't
take much to make a difference. You can also tell if the camber is off if the
tires wear in a cone shape.
3. Increase the preload on your rear suspension (stiffen it).
The rest cost money:
4. Softer front springs.
5. Softer compound front tires (both or just the right one).

Make one change at a time and drive the car to see the results before making
another change. Just a few suggestions, good luck.

 
 
 

Wheel base for on-road cars

Post by Robbie Langle » Sat, 05 Oct 1996 04:00:00




Quote:
>         Can anyone tell what the effect of a shorter wheel base compared
to a
> longer wheel base. I wen't to my first race saturday and did VERY lousy,
main
> reason being i would try to take the inner section of the oval track and
would
> end up on the outter by the time the turn ended. I'm driving a EV10ss and
any
> set-up tips would greatly be appraited for a oval track..

>                                                                 Thanks

A shorter wheelbase will make a car more responsive while turning.  A
longer wheelbase will make the car a bit more stable.  From the problem you
are describing, you either don't have the dual rate for the steering on
your radio turned up as far as you need to, or either you have a bad push
(understeer).  Check your right front tire...does it have a cone shape to
it?  If so, you are pushing going into the corner and scrubbing the right
front tire.  To increase steering going into the corner, increase the
caster on the front end and/or put in a stiffer left front spring.
   If the car goes into the corner well, but pushes out to the outside
while accelerating off the corner (as you seem to be describing), then
adjust the rear pod tweak to place more pressure on the right rear tire
which will give you more steering coming out of the corner. Make these
adjustments a little bit at a time and only adjust one thing at a time to
make sure a certain adjustment worked or not.
   You can also experiment with softer or firmer tire compounds and also
tire stagger (outside tires bigger than inside tires).  Certain body styles
will affect handling as well.  I like the Protoform Monte Carlo SS body for
our tracks here in Arkansas....the shape helps make quite a bit of front
downforce without getting the car loose coming out of the turns.
   Hope I was any help....Later!