cutting stained glass

cutting stained glass

Post by Paul Wils » Mon, 22 Sep 1997 04:00:00




Quote:
>     I copied your input for future reference. Another question.  Met a
>demonstrator yesterday  who does not tap the cut before breaking it.  He
>said that over the yrs. this method produced a smoother cut and that if he
>tapped it the cut was ragged and rough. Any feedback on this? Thanks again,

I hardly ever tap.  Some serpentine scores on hard to cut art glass
and and occasional radical inside curve is about the only time I "tap"
and I do it very gently.  The concept is similar to the Morton Safety
Break System which is probably more reliable.  I have seen the Morton
system demo'd and it works great on tough cuts.

Paul

 
 
 

cutting stained glass

Post by Jeff Boe » Tue, 23 Sep 1997 04:00:00


: Hi-
:  I'm new to this news group and stained glass.  Could someone please
: E-mail me with the best method and tool for cutting glass.
:                                                                     Thanks
: Shirley
I thought that I would jump in here. I also am new to this group. I have
been watching some rather heated discussions for about a week now. Myself
I write software for big mainframe computers all day. I don't know much
about the internet or chatrooms. Oh yes, I do dabble with stained glass.I
am working on a pair of Frank Lloyd Wright lamps that I saw in a picture
of the Chaney house of Oak Park.  I have no intention of selling anything.
This is my hobby. If I had to price
things then it would be too much like work.

 
 
 

cutting stained glass

Post by JGriffi2 » Wed, 24 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Hi-
 I'm new to this news group and stained glass.  Could someone please
E-mail me with the best method and tool for cutting glass.
                                                                    Thanks
Shirley

 
 
 

cutting stained glass

Post by Bob Duchesne » Wed, 24 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
>:  I'm new to this news group and stained glass.  Could someone please
>: E-mail me with the best method and tool for cutting glass.
>:                                                                    
Thanks
>: Shirley

Check out the stained glass bulletin board on Prodigy Crafts 2. You are
very likely to get all the help you need there.
Bob
 
 
 

cutting stained glass

Post by Schneid » Wed, 24 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Hi Shirley,


Quote:


>: Hi-
>:  I'm new to this news group and stained glass.  Could someone please
>: E-mail me with the best method and tool for cutting glass.
>:                                                                     Thanks
>: Shirley
>I thought that I would jump in here. I also am new to this group. I have
>been watching some rather heated discussions for about a week now.

Don't get discouraged if you get flamed/cut off/put down here by
"professionals".  The newsgroup name rec.crafts.glass, is what this is
supposed to be.  There is a mix of ForFun/ForProfit people here.

To your original question, about cutting glass.  You didn't say
whether or not you can cut plain (non-art) glass yet.  I was fortunate
enough to have access to a really nice teacher who doesn't try to sell
unnecessary crud, but likes time-saving/safety tools.  I've spoken to
many people who were less than satisfied with their teachers.

Remember to ALWAYS wear safety glasses -- there are great looking ones
with comfortable "glasses" style earpiecesavailable now  : )

If you are just learning to cut glass, you will probably want to hold
off on buying a $20-$35 cutter right now.  You're more likely to mess
up the head right now ($15-$20 replacement), besides then you'll
really appreciate it more later.  You'll need cutting oil, and a small
jar to dip the cutter in.

If you haven't already, start out cutting plain (clear non-art) glass.
There is a wide variety of "art glass" out there with varying levels
of difficulty.  One of the easiest types to cut on is the smooth side
of "glue chip" glass.  This comes in a wide variety of colors, and is
about the cheapest artglass you can find.   I don't like to waste
anything, and since the wispy, lacey look lent itself to the "angel
look", I made dozens of "angel bodies" for xmas ornaments.  Good
practice for cuting inside and outside curves -- not to mention lots
of gifts.  I also got a pattern for a 3-piece humming bird for a
change of pace.   I found a "s***bin" of a wide variety of art
glass.  I went to town cutting angels and hummers.

Be careful of picking a "harder to cut" style of glass until you've
successfully cut it for small projects.  My first small panel project
was a cardinal sitting on branch.  After cutting everything else out
of really easy to cut glass, I was feeling very sure of myself.  I
wanted to make the two leaves out of some lovely green s***uroboros.
It was so bumpy, and I kept pressing too *** it, and I kept
breaking the leaves in half.  That really humbled me.  I went back to
the s***bin and bought  all of the really neat green glass.  I
finally got those two little leaves cut out, but they probably took as
much time and effort as the entire rest of the project.  I look back
on that and laugh now; because, I know that right now I could have
both of those cut out and ground in a couple of minutes.

I returned to the s***bin with a determination to be able to learn
to "cut anything".  I'm really glad I did that.  Besides having many
nice little gifts, I learned the degree of cutting expertise the
different glass requires.  Now I know whether or not I am up to
cutting a deep inside curve on a particular type of glass.  

Quote:
>Myself
>I write software for big mainframe computers all day. I don't know much
>about the internet or chatrooms. Oh yes, I do dabble with stained glass.I
>am working on a pair of Frank Lloyd Wright lamps that I saw in a picture
>of the Chaney house of Oak Park.

Great.

Quote:
> I have no intention of selling anything.

Me neither.

Quote:
>This is my hobby. If I had to price
>things then it would be too much like work.

Yeah, I hear you.  Hobbies are supposed to be fun.  I think my work
should be too, but I find that sometimes it's too much like work.
 
 
 

cutting stained glass

Post by Schneid » Wed, 24 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Oops,
I didn't really answer her question.  I like a pistol grip cutter that
self-dispenses the cutting oil.  The pivoting head makes cutting much
easier.  Toyo is nice.  There are others that are similar -- usually
right next to each other in the catalogue.  There are also similar
ones that are pencil type that dispense/pivot (I think) also.  There
are many devotees to them.

It seems to be that whichever one someone gets used to is "the best".
There are a lot of "bests" depending on whom you speak to.

 
 
 

cutting stained glass

Post by JGriffi2 » Wed, 24 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Thanks--all of you.  The advice about using clear glass for practice in
cutting never occurred to me.  My first class(3 yrs. ago) was held at the
high school and there were approx. 25 attending.  The teacher was a retired
indiv. who believed that the project should have 50-100 pieces in order for
everyone to experience every possible type of 'cut'--lots of practical
experience.  However it overwhelmed me.  He did however recommend the
pistol grip cutter as my hands begin to cramp using the pencil type. It
solved that problem. There was no mention of cutting practice And I missed
the class for soldering.  However last fall(96) a young lady at the art
ctr. had 4   (3 hr). classes and I learned how to do a 13 piece picture.
Very rewarding and I definitely got hooked.
     I copied your input for future reference. Another question.  Met a
demonstrator yesterday  who does not tap the cut before breaking it.  He
said that over the yrs. this method produced a smoother cut and that if he
tapped it the cut was ragged and rough. Any feedback on this? Thanks again,
Shirley.

 
 
 

cutting stained glass

Post by M. Sava » Thu, 25 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> Thanks--all of you.  The advice about using clear glass for practice in
> cutting never occurred to me.  My first class(3 yrs. ago) was held at the
> high school and there were approx. 25 attending.  The teacher was a retired
> indiv. who believed that the project should have 50-100 pieces in order for
> everyone to experience every possible type of 'cut'--lots of practical
> experience.  However it overwhelmed me.  He did however recommend the
> pistol grip cutter as my hands begin to cramp using the pencil type. It
> solved that problem. There was no mention of cutting practice And I missed
> the class for soldering.  However last fall(96) a young lady at the art
> ctr. had 4   (3 hr). classes and I learned how to do a 13 piece picture.
> Very rewarding and I definitely got hooked.
>      I copied your input for future reference. Another question.  Met a
> demonstrator yesterday  who does not tap the cut before breaking it.  He
> said that over the yrs. this method produced a smoother cut and that if he
> tapped it the cut was ragged and rough. Any feedback on this? Thanks again,
> Shirley.

i personally never try to tap for that same reason. tapping will give a
more ragged edge. and sometimes micro fractures, that will crack the
piece when soldering. the only time i do it is when it's a really tough
cut, or a deep cut.

btw my first project was only 7 pieces, shen never forced us to do
curves. acually we were allowed to only do 5 pieces, i chose more. the
other thing about the project was it was mainly clear with a few colored
pieces in it. most chose 1 i chose 3. a good starting project for a
first timer should really not exceed 20-30. otherwise people will get
frustrated, and take home a half completed project; and never do stained
glass again.

---Mike Savad

--
Mike's Stained Glass
http://www.geocities.com/Paris/1141
 New Pages Added: 11 New Tip Pages, Including: Random Tips, Box Making
Tips, How to Fix Scratched Glass, Getting Pictures, How to Maintain
Tools and How Long They Last, Pictures of my Lamp Lit, 1 New Project,
Shopping Lists, and See My Bio with a picture of ME.

 
 
 

cutting stained glass

Post by GlassG.. » Thu, 25 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Go to your local stained glass store and see if they'll let you try the
different cutters. It's one, if not the most important tools you'll buy.

Hey Watson...you trying to stir up trouble???
My dear friend Col. Klink would say...veeeddy
intaresting!!

The "GlassGuru"
The Ralph Nader of Glass
Crusader of truths & commentary.
".....and a really neat guy!"

 
 
 

cutting stained glass

Post by GARYDODG » Thu, 25 Sep 1997 04:00:00


We have been teaching glass here at our studio for over 15 years and
working in glass for almost 25.

We make it a point not to mention that some people tap their glass (unless
we have a student who is already a tapper), then we have to go through all
of the explanations of the disadvantages of tapping.  Basically though when
you tap on glass you are sending a circular shock wave through the sheet.
Like ripples in a pond.  If you're lucky it does what you want it to, but
it will also exert its force on any defect in the glass and can result in
needless breakage.  THe key to success is an understanding of how glass
behaves.  Scoring creates a fissure in the glass and you must learn to
exert the correct type of force to spread the fissure and separate the
sheet into two pieces.  
As for the best tool, in my opinion the Thomas grip cutter by Toyo is the
best.  There are three ways to hold it.  The best of the three is
unfortunately not shown in the instructions packaged with it!  Place the
cutter so that the thing at the top that swivels,  sticks up a bit is
between the first two fingers much like the way many people hold a
conventional cutter.  The flat part of the swively thing rests firmly on
the ball of the hand.  You needn't grip the cutter tightly to keep it from
slipping through you hand.  You can then control the freely turning barrel
of the cutter with your fingertips to steer the cutter.
This tool has saved me from carpel tunnel problems and allows me to cut
complex curves without throwing my arm and body all around the room as is
necessary with a pistol grip cutter.

Gary Dodge



Quote:
> Thanks--all of you.  The advice about using clear glass for practice in
> cutting never occurred to me.  My first class(3 yrs. ago) was held at the
> high school and there were approx. 25 attending.  The teacher was a
retired
> indiv. who believed that the project should have 50-100 pieces in order
for
> everyone to experience every possible type of 'cut'--lots of practical
> experience.  However it overwhelmed me.  He did however recommend the
> pistol grip cutter as my hands begin to cramp using the pencil type. It
> solved that problem. There was no mention of cutting practice And I
missed
> the class for soldering.  However last fall(96) a young lady at the art
> ctr. had 4   (3 hr). classes and I learned how to do a 13 piece picture.
> Very rewarding and I definitely got hooked.
>      I copied your input for future reference. Another question.  Met a
> demonstrator yesterday  who does not tap the cut before breaking it.  He
> said that over the yrs. this method produced a smoother cut and that if
he
> tapped it the cut was ragged and rough. Any feedback on this? Thanks
again,
> Shirley.

 
 
 

cutting stained glass

Post by John Mcc » Mon, 29 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Hi i also im quite new at cutting but i took lessons and they told me a
pitol grip cutter was best and i have had very good luck with it

 
 
 

cutting stained glass

Post by Brya » Fri, 03 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Tap?  I've never felt the need to tap my score.  Everything I've ever read
or heard from my instructiors suggests that tapping just increases your
chances for a mis-break.

Bryan +ACI-hardly an expert+ACI- Paschke
+ADw-19970923220500.SAA12693+AEA-ladder01.news.aol.com+AD4-...
Thanks--all of you.  The advice about using clear glass for practice in
cutting never occurred to me.  My first class(3 yrs. ago) was held at the
high school and there were approx. 25 attending.  The teacher was a retired
indiv. who believed that the project should have 50-100 pieces in order for
everyone to experience every possible type of 'cut'--lots of practical
experience.  However it overwhelmed me.  He did however recommend the
pistol grip cutter as my hands begin to cramp using the pencil type. It
solved that problem. There was no mention of cutting practice And I missed
the class for soldering.  However last fall(96) a young lady at the art
ctr. had 4   (3 hr). classes and I learned how to do a 13 piece picture.
Very rewarding and I definitely got hooked.
     I copied your input for future reference. Another question.  Met a
demonstrator yesterday  who does not tap the cut before breaking it.  He
said that over the yrs. this method produced a smoother cut and that if he
tapped it the cut was ragged and rough. Any feedback on this? Thanks again,
Shirley.