polishing small stained glass pieces

polishing small stained glass pieces

Post by JuliaRei » Fri, 04 Jul 1997 04:00:00



I make jewelry using a stained glass technique and have to polish each
piece individually by hand - I use Simichrome Polish - but it's so time
consuming. Anyone know of a better, more time-effective method of getting
my silver/tin ("SilverGleem") solder to look shiny?

 
 
 

polishing small stained glass pieces

Post by M. Sava » Fri, 04 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I make jewelry using a stained glass technique and have to polish each
> piece individually by hand - I use Simichrome Polish - but it's so time
> consuming. Anyone know of a better, more time-effective method of getting
> my silver/tin ("SilverGleem") solder to look shiny?

the only thing i can think of is to line them up in a row, and rub it
that way. or put the polish on, and rub it in the towel (as if you were
drying an orange). it just takes time, maybe you can hire a niece or
nephew to do it.

---Mike Savad

--
Mike's Stained Glass
http://www.geocities.com/Paris/1141
 New Pages Added:
 - New Instructional Guides Added!!!
 - The Creative Process
 - How to Find Patterns for Suncatchers
 - Picking Out Glass in the Store
 - 5 New Pictures in the 3-D Catagory
 - 2 New Pictures in the Panel Catagory
 - Updated Shots of The Heart of Atlantis, and Japanese Garden

 
 
 

polishing small stained glass pieces

Post by Dili » Fri, 04 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:


> > I make jewelry using a stained glass technique and have to polish each
> > piece individually by hand - I use Simichrome Polish - but it's so time
> > consuming. Anyone know of a better, more time-effective method of getting
> > my silver/tin ("SilverGleem") solder to look shiny?

> the only thing i can think of is to line them up in a row, and rub it
> that way. or put the polish on, and rub it in the towel (as if you were
> drying an orange). it just takes time, maybe you can hire a niece or
> nephew to do it.

> ---Mike Savad

I am not completely familier with the stained glass technique; however,
I am familier with soldering and cleaning/polishing. I would like to
suggest the following. It might work with stained glass too.

1) In electronics assemblies, it is common to clean the soldered board
assembly with a solvent (like Iso-propyl Alchohol) to remove the flux
residue.

2) Using the polish (Simichrome) with a buffing wheel on a Dremmel tool
should allow one to quickly finish small pieces. With a handheld tool,
one can apply just the right pressure on the wheel to control the finish
and also work on contoured surfaces etc.

Mike,

On a similar note, I have seen some road side shops in India offering to
polish wrist watch face glass (crystal?). They use bigger (6 inch or so)
buffing wheels and jewler's rouge to polish these glass faces to remove
scratches.

Dilip

 
 
 

polishing small stained glass pieces

Post by M. Sava » Fri, 04 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:



> > > I make jewelry using a stained glass technique and have to polish each
> > > piece individually by hand - I use Simichrome Polish - but it's so time
> > > consuming. Anyone know of a better, more time-effective method of getting
> > > my silver/tin ("SilverGleem") solder to look shiny?

> > the only thing i can think of is to line them up in a row, and rub it
> > that way. or put the polish on, and rub it in the towel (as if you were
> > drying an orange). it just takes time, maybe you can hire a niece or
> > nephew to do it.

> > ---Mike Savad

> I am not completely familier with the stained glass technique; however,
> I am familier with soldering and cleaning/polishing. I would like to
> suggest the following. It might work with stained glass too.

> 1) In electronics assemblies, it is common to clean the soldered board
> assembly with a solvent (like Iso-propyl Alchohol) to remove the flux
> residue.

> 2) Using the polish (Simichrome) with a buffing wheel on a Dremmel tool
> should allow one to quickly finish small pieces. With a handheld tool,
> one can apply just the right pressure on the wheel to control the finish
> and also work on contoured surfaces etc.

> Mike,

> On a similar note, I have seen some road side shops in India offering to
> polish wrist watch face glass (crystal?). They use bigger (6 inch or so)
> buffing wheels and jewler's rouge to polish these glass faces to remove
> scratches.

> Dilip

when polishing little jewelry things, dremeling the solder would
probably take longer then doing it by hand. the buffing method works ok
on a bezel. but it would probably melt the solder, and of course if the
glass get's caught under the wheel, it's cut city.

---Mike Savad

--
Mike's Stained Glass
http://www.geocities.com/Paris/1141
 New Pages Added:
 - New Instructional Guides Added!!!
 - The Creative Process
 - How to Find Patterns for Suncatchers
 - Picking Out Glass in the Store
 - 5 New Pictures in the 3-D Catagory
 - 2 New Pictures in the Panel Catagory
 - Updated Shots of The Heart of Atlantis, and Japanese Garden

 
 
 

polishing small stained glass pieces

Post by STACK.. » Sat, 05 Jul 1997 04:00:00



   >Date: 3 Jul 1997 03:23:41 GMT
   >I make jewelry using a stained glass technique and have to polish each
   >piece individually by hand - I use Simichrome Polish - but it's so time
   >consuming. Anyone know of a better, more time-effective method of
   >getting my silver/tin ("SilverGleem") solder to look shiny?

  How about a buffing wheel on a bench grinder?  A little jeweler's rouge,
and you're done in a flash.  For the low spots that the buffer misses, there's
always a little buffing point on a dremel tool.


Metamorphosis Glassworks Page             http://people.delphi.com/stackman
GLASS HOST & Assistant Manager      of       The Delphi Arts & Crafts Forum
                       http://www.delphi.com/crafts

 
 
 

polishing small stained glass pieces

Post by losa.. » Wed, 09 Jul 1997 04:00:00



 ju>Newsgroups: rec.crafts.glass
 ju>I make jewelry using a stained glass technique and have to polish
 ju>each piece individually by hand - I use Simichrome Polish - but
 ju>it's so time consuming. Anyone know of a better, more
 ju>time-effective method of getting my silver/tin ("SilverGleem")
 ju>solder to look shiny?

     I used to make jewerly, cabachons, and silversmithing, Faberlust,
is a form of polish used in the hobby of rock cutting and can be found
at rock shops. It requires that you have a buffer with a felt pad, you just
apply this stick to the pad and buff away, give a great luster to a finished
metal piece as well as the glass. Only draw back is if the solder is
discolored, or oxidized, it will not remove it, in that case another felt
pad charged with red rouge, will prepolish and also remove small scratchs.

     Red rouge is also good for removing small scratchs from glass, be sure
never to mix these two compounds on the same felt buff, and after using red
rouge, be sure to tourly clean the peice before using Faberlust to finish
polish.