Need imformation on quiet propane burners

Need imformation on quiet propane burners

Post by james Adlingto » Sun, 04 Jan 1998 04:00:00



if any one has any information about quiet propane burners
please help.

 
 
 

Need imformation on quiet propane burners

Post by Rod Christe » Mon, 05 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>if any one has any information about quiet propane burners
>please help.

Hi!

The homemade and commercial burners that I have used and seen being used are
quiet when they are working correctly.  Burners that whistle, burble, scream
(or all the above) are not working correctly.  The usual problem is that the
flame has entered the venturi section of the burner.  While my friends and I
are not sure that we know what is really happening, here are a few of the
things that have been blamed for this problem:

1)  A badly drilled jet.  Operation is sensitive to the speed and shape of
the gas coming out of the jet.  If you can get to it, look for a burr or lip
in or on the orifice of the jet.  Bad alignment with the throat is also a
possibility, but should not happen with a properly designed burner.

2)  Gas pressure too low.  A good burner may be forgiving of gas pressure,
most of ours work from 5 to 20 psi.  Some may only work at the high range.
I suspect that these actually have problem #1.

3)  Burner is getting too hot.  If the business end of the burner sticks too
far into the kiln, (e.g. beyond the wall and into the space inside), it will
heat up.

4)  Some burners don't seem to work well when pointed straight down.  Don't
laugh, some work fine this way.

If you experiment with burners have fun, but please consider the following
phrases:  Fire extinguisher.  Buddy system.  A leak too small to smell can
make a surprisingly big flame.  I'm not trying to be patronizing, but I've
startled myself with these things a few times during even my limited
experience.

Rod Christel


 
 
 

Need imformation on quiet propane burners

Post by MikeFir » Tue, 06 Jan 1998 04:00:00



Quote:

>if any one has any information about quiet propane burners please help.

 and
 In a message dated 98-01-04 14:33:45 EST, you write:
 << I can build silent ***s its just the furnace that roars >>

  Based on my limited experience, I would think the most likely problem is that
the flame is burning in the throat of the burner, possibly because of
restricted venting.  You may not be having problems with your ***
because the open front provides venting and because it run full out, while the
furnace burner is being run at less than full capacity and may not be vented
enough when the door is closed (do you have a flue?)
  Gibberson or Wilber or iron heads for the burners are supposed to make them
more silent than an open headed pipe, but I have found the they can be noisy if
they are burning wrong.
  Test 1 would be to turn off all the lights while the unit is on and see where
it is red (or white)   It should be red only at the end of the burner, not back
in the piping.  
   Test 2 would be to remove the burner from furnace and run it in the open
air.  Light it up and observe the flame, if the settings are the same as when
in use and it burns in the throat, then you know you have a problem.  It may be
that the burner is too big, so that if you run it at proper air flow and fuel,
you are pumping in so much heat that you have to turn it down, at which point
the air flow is not enough to keep the flame positioned.
   You may need a smaller burner.
   If the burner seems okay outside, then check it in place and see whether it
burns quieter with the door open (good venting.)    To get it out of the
throat, you may have to cut the gas and cool the throat with air flow, jack the
air flow up and restart with a strong gas flow.
   If the noise increases when the door is closed and the flame moves back into
the throat (the pipe gets red hot) then you need to loosen the fit of the door
or add venting.

    If you have not built a burner, you might wish to try an exercise in
building a simple burner.  You will need 1" or 1 1/2" black iron pipe, a 6"
*** and a T and a brass reducer from the size of the pipe to 1/4" pipe (or a
plug.)   The reducer is drilled out to take a slip fit of a 1/4" brass pipe.
On one end of the brass pipe is placed a cap with a small hole drilled in it
(#55, 1/16" or less) and on the other is an adaptor to whatever supply of gas
you have.  (On a smaller scale, copper tube with a drilled cap and flare
fitting on the ends.)
  The *** and adaptor are screwed in opposite ends of the T, the base being
left open.  
   The purpose of the exercise is to adjust the small pipe within the T and
observe how various positions and pressures affect the flame.  The gas spewing
from the hole in the cap drags air from the side of the T.  Depending on the
position, various amounts of air will be mixed with the gas, producing a richer
or leaner flame.  In addition to changing the position of the pipe, various
pressures of gas and sizes of holes can be tried.
   If a black iron bell adaptor (to the next size larger pipe) is added to the
***, it will act as a flamekeeper (as well as a sacrificial end) especially
when higher flow rates are used, as when adding a blower.
   The burner can be made permanent by finding the best flame position, marking
the pipe and then using epoxy to hold the pipe in position.  The joint should
not get hot enough to affect the epoxy.  If you want to get the hotter joints
apart use anti sieze compound sold for sparkplugs, it is rated much higher than
pipe joint compound.
  Mike

 Mike Firth, Hot Bits furnace glassblowing newsletter

  Home Page: http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

Need imformation on quiet propane burners

Post by Rick Sherber » Wed, 07 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> if any one has any information about quiet propane burners
> please help.

I don't read into this post that you are having trouble with an existing
burner setup, just that you want to know about whats available.  BUT if
indeed you are having trouble, what the other replies failed to mention
is that pre-ignition (sometimes called pop-back) is a *very* dangerous
situation and should be corrected AT ONCE.

Pre-ignition is where the gas burns back in the burner head or venturi
itself.  It sounds like a jet taking off and the burner head and
possibly the associated plumbing get very hot.  Rod was right on with a
few of the possible causes of this condition.  

If you are having trouble, give Dudley Giberson a call at 603-456-3569.
He also mfgs. burners.

Best,
Rick Sherbert

 
 
 

Need imformation on quiet propane burners

Post by MikeFir » Thu, 08 Jan 1998 04:00:00



Quote:

>If you are having trouble, give Dudley Giberson a call at 603-456-3569.
He
>also mfgs. burners.

 Good guy.  Actually only mfgs. burner heads (ceramic), not the burner body.
His legendary catalog and encyclopedia of information includes plans for blown
burners.  He likes Dedell venturi burners [Dedell Gas Burner & Equipment Co.
R.R.1, Box 2135, Newfane VT 05345, 1-802-365-4575] and Dedell price list
includes burners with iron or Giberson heads.

 Mike Firth, Hot Bits furnace glassblowing newsletter

  Home Page: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/MikeFirth