Beadmaking Kiln???

Beadmaking Kiln???

Post by Nancy Grave » Sun, 31 May 1998 04:00:00



I have recently started making glass beads after taking some classes
with Cindy Jenkins. To anneal my work, I use a fiber blanket.  Several
of the books I've read suggest using a kiln for this.  Could anyone help
with info on brand, how this is done (do you keep opening and closing it
as you complete a bead?

Also, some of the glass I'm working with is shocky...The books suggest
using a hot plate to gradually warm the rods.  How is this
accomplished...though I know it sounds silly, Do you place the rods in a
pot of water warming on the hot plate or what?

This is a whole new aspect of glass for me, I've done lead work for
years but feel somewhat like a newborn when it comes to hot glass.  I've
never done any fusing either so I keep trying to absorb as much info as
possible.  Any help and info is very appreciated.

                Thank you for the help!

 
 
 

Beadmaking Kiln???

Post by Kalera Ashl » Fri, 05 Jun 1998 04:00:00



 nj> I have recently started making glass beads after taking some classes
 nj> with Cindy Jenkins. To anneal my work, I use a fiber blanket.
 nj> Several of the books I've read suggest using a kiln for this. Could
 nj> anyone help with info on brand, how this is done (do you keep
 nj> opening and closing it as you complete a bead?

I use a small electric wok filled with vermiculite, and it works very well
for me. I turn the wok all the way up and let it heat thoroughly before I
begin, and I usually let the beads soak for about four hours before I turn it
off. I really don't know if that's the recommended time, because I am mostly
self-taught through trial and error and only recently purchased Jenkins' book.

I don't know how well large beads would do in a setup like this because I'm
still using a Hot Head torch, and will until I sell enough beads to purchase
a Bench Burner in addition to just covering my material costs. I am very
pleased with it so far, though.

I have a friend who uses a custom-made hot box made from a toolbox lined with
firebrick and heated with coils. He cut a small door in one end, which is
covered by a metal rotating flap, and there are grooves in the edge of the
box so that he can open it, set the mandrel in the groove with the bead insid
ethe box, and quickly close it again. He's more limited in the number of
beads he can anneal at a time, but he can anneal larger beads and they're
probably stronger.

The advantage of my wok setup, however, is that you can purchase a used
electric wok for under $10, or a new one for under $70.

 nj> Also, some of the glass I'm working with is shocky...The books
 nj> suggest using a hot plate to gradually warm the rods. How is this
 nj> accomplished...though I know it sounds silly, Do you place the rods
 nj> in a pot of water warming on the hot plate or what?

I know someone who does just that, but I also know someone who bought a
"buffet warmer", which is a type of flat rectangular hot plate designed to
keep food at a bacteria-safe serving temperature. He just lays his rods
directly on the warmer.

It cost a bit more than a regular hot plate, but it seems to be really
convenient.

 
 
 

Beadmaking Kiln???

Post by Rodger Coghla » Wed, 10 Jun 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> I have recently started making glass beads after taking some classes
> with Cindy Jenkins. To anneal my work, I use a fiber blanket.  Several
> of the books I've read suggest using a kiln for this.  Could anyone help
> with info on brand, how this is done (do you keep opening and closing it
> as you complete a bead?

> Also, some of the glass I'm working with is shocky...The books suggest
> using a hot plate to gradually warm the rods.  How is this
> accomplished...though I know it sounds silly, Do you place the rods in a
> pot of water warming on the hot plate or what?

> This is a whole new aspect of glass for me, I've done lead work for
> years but feel somewhat like a newborn when it comes to hot glass.  I've
> never done any fusing either so I keep trying to absorb as much info as
> possible.  Any help and info is very appreciated.

>                 Thank you for the help!

What I did was get an electric griddle and lay the rods of glass that i
was going to use on it.  I set the griddle to about 300.  This went a
long way to prevent heat shock (I was using moretti <dang, it has been
so long I've forgotten the name but I think that is close>).

Rodger
--
All opinions expressed are Mine
 (mea culpa, mea culpa, Mea  maxima culpa)