newbie- home glass safety

newbie- home glass safety

Post by Robin Simo » Sun, 03 Aug 1997 04:00:00



hi all.....

new to glass crafting. working on a mosaic with glass s***from a stained
glass shop.

jut cut myself rather nicely too.....

it doesnt hurt...but its kinda deep and bleeding a good bit.
shard broke a good bit sharper than I expected it too and gouged my left
index finger. good thing I'm right handed.

anyway....I notice all these ennie beenie chips off my glass too while I
worked.

I wiped upo with a damp paper towel, but i need suggestions as to increase
safety when working at home on my kitchen table with glass....

like, duh! It's sharp! oops.....

any suggestions for protecting newbie fingers ?

Robin

or should I just plan on laying in some major bandaids?

 
 
 

newbie- home glass safety

Post by Robin Simo » Sun, 03 Aug 1997 04:00:00


: > hi all.....
: >
: > new to glass crafting. working on a mosaic with glass s***from a
: > stained
: > glass shop.
: >
: > or should I just plan on laying in some major bandaids?

: First off.. Get out of the Kitchen! Glass bits will fly everywhere and
: they have their own "sense" of direction. If there is a small hole in
: your workshirt or sneaker or whatever, the glass will find it. That also
: means it will find your cooking utensils, glasses, cups, etc.

Oh. actually its my kitchen nook table ....but I think next time I'll put
some newspaper down to catch the glass that hits the floor. or a cloth or
something.

: Secondly..After you have left your kitchen and have taken over the
: garage or cellar or spare room, lay some old carpet on the floor,
: something ugly (keeps visitors out) to catch those little glass bits and
: also to catch your flux, solder, and other chemicals that you WILL spill
: sooner or later. In this area make a nice little work table. (A 4x8
: plywood sheet on 2x4's works wonders)

OK. I'm not working with solder and stuff- I'm doing glass mosaics and
then grouting it. I'm not ready for all the chemicals and metal type
stuff. I'd take a class before I even tried that. OK. so I'll try to fit
another table in my office. neat trick...sigh. or next time I'll go to the
shop and work, or buy one of those boards with the waffle tops that seems
to catch falling glass snips.

: Third.. NEVER slid your hand on the work table, even with a cloth. Use a
: Dust Brush! also never slid your hands on the edge of the glass
: pieces.(duh!)

dust brush added to shopping list.

: Fourth.. Practice with your tools to eliminate the sharp edges on the
: glass. Cut up a bunch of s***(clear glass from old windows will give
: you plenty of "flaired" edges. Especially if you use an old cutter..It's
: good practice)

please explain flaired edges to me....and I have a new cutter- I just
bought one of those self-oiling jobbies....

: Fifth.. Yeah, keep bandaids around till you learn.

: and last.. Get an apron for using chemicals like patina (copper patina
: just loves to eat small holes in your pants and therefore gives those
: bits of glass a target).

I have an apron and I think I'll wear it next time just in case.

Thanks.

Robin

: Good Luck and if you have anymore questions just ask away. There's lots
: of good help in this group.

: Lee Althouse
: Althouse Stained Glass
: www.art-n-glass.com

 
 
 

newbie- home glass safety

Post by Sunkach » Sun, 03 Aug 1997 04:00:00


As you work with the glass and become expert with it, you will learn to
handle it in such a way as not to cut yourself.  In the meantime, stock up
on bandaids.  I don't do the mosaics, so I don't know if you have the same
problem, but I usually find that it's the same fingers that are always
getting nicked.  I usually put those 3M sport bandages on those fingers
before I even start.  I lose some dexterity, but I save those fingers.
Some people find that *** fingertips used by cashiers and bank tellers
are helpful.  
Ann M. Patton, R.N.

 
 
 

newbie- home glass safety

Post by jmas.. » Mon, 04 Aug 1997 04:00:00


Bandaids are a fact of life in this craft.  If you mess around with
sharp things long enough, you WILL get cut.  Expect it and take care of
it.

Kitchen tables are bad for two reasons; they are usually the wrong
height, and there are always glass particles flying around that you
really don't want in your oatmeal.  Regardless of what you are doing,
get out of the kitchen!  You are forming a habit you won't like later.

As far as containing your glass scraps, there is a wonderful device I
have used for at least a decade and highly recommend; it's called "the
Morton Surface."  It looks like a piece of ceiling tile with the little
squares in it except the holes don't go all the way through.  As you
work the pieces of glass fall into those little squares where they
remain until you take the surface outside and dump them into a trash
container.  The only safety problem I ever had with the Morton is that
from time to time a s***that is too big to fit entirely into one of
the squares will stick up just enough to nail me, so it's necessary to
clean these things regularly.  However, I used to have my studio in my
bedroom, a small bedroom, and never once found a s***of glass where I
didn't want it.  Try it.  
Good luck,
Jerry

 
 
 

newbie- home glass safety

Post by Wayne Be » Tue, 05 Aug 1997 04:00:00




Quote:
>hi all.....
snip

>I wiped upo with a damp paper towel, but i need suggestions as to increase
>safety when working at home on my kitchen table with glass....

snip
>any suggestions for protecting newbie fingers ?

Generally, the area I work on stained glass is kept clean. I have a
brush and dust pan nearby that use to clean up glass from the working
surface.
I also have an old desk with a one inch plywood board on top. I never
use the surface in the kitchen for cutting class. I do use the counter
top next to the sink for grinding but this surface is thoroughly
washed afterwards.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
Wayne Bell

"http://library.uwaterloo.ca:80/~jgszalai/wayne.htm"
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newbie- home glass safety

Post by Sam Gaylo » Tue, 05 Aug 1997 04:00:00


I have a couple of wooden shelves over my work bench.  First they're great
for temp storage of tools, items, etc., I'm not using "right now"  To the
front of the lower shelf I have stapled about a dozen 2x2" gauze pads.  
I'm not sure if the staple holes at the edge comprimize the sterility of
the package, but when needed, I'm more interested in stoping the *** flow.

FWIW, my work bench is basicly a 30" x 6' plywood table (with folding legs)
and several coats of polyurethane on the top.  That prevents the glass
slivers from sticking.  I then can use a use a dust brush and dust pan to
sweep the top.  I usually end up dumping the dust pan into a 1/2 gallon
"cardboard" milk container, that will hold several months of s***pieces.
When filled, I can fold the top shut, tape it with duct tape, and deposit
it in the garbage.  I once was a "nice guy" and put a label on the container
stating that it contained glass shards.  The garbage men would't take it,
so I quit labeling it.

samg


Hewlett Packard/Colorado Springs