cutting bottles

cutting bottles

Post by Bill & Cheryl Irw » Thu, 27 Feb 1997 04:00:00



I need to cut the top off triangular scotch bottles as I want to use
the bottoms for jewelry boxes with stained glass lids.  I've tried the
score and tap method with my normal diamond cutter with limited
success.  Then I tried to make holes in them with an acetylene and
oxegen torch this was an interesting exercise ( a couple bottles
shattered as they cooled). I have access to an LPG torch which
would'nt get as hot, could I use this somehow?  I've been told that in
the "old days" they made beer bottles into jam jars by using a hot
wire?  Also another friend said he saw on T.V. someone using string
soaked in methylated spirits and lighting it--it leaves a decent score
line supposedly, I tried kerosene, but it didn't work and I'm making
my husband and kids nervous. Please help if you can.  The whole point
of this is that our local art gallery is having a competion\exhibition
with recycled glass and I'm interested in entering.

Cheryl Irwin

 
 
 

cutting bottles

Post by last name:Anthon » Fri, 28 Feb 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

> I need to cut the top off triangular scotch bottles as I want to use
> the bottoms for jewelry boxes with stained glass lids.  

<snip>
Hi Cheryl,
        I read your post this morning and it popped into my head while I was
out getting my daily walk, and I came up with some thoughts. First, when
you score, the score should run all the way around the bottle. Tap from
the inside with the ball of your cutter (if it has one). This technique
doesn't always work, but it was the method of those bottle cutters
popular in the 70's. The idea behind the burning string or hot wire is
thermal shock. The string burns, the glass gets hot in that line, then
you quickly dunk the bottle in cold water and it cracks along the line.
I've never tried that, don't know how well it works. People who have
glass bandsaws seem to feel that they would not work too well on
something as big as a bottle. I've never seen a water jet cutter, that
might work, assuming you could find someone who has one. Now for the
creative part: (how desperate are you? :-) ) You could use the hole
drilling bit on your grinder and drill a succession of holes around the
bottle. I would first try cracking between the holes using cutter and
tapping. If that didn't work, just use the side of the bit to run the
holes together. Then you can grind the bumpy edges down with your
grinder.
        Well, anyway, good luck. I liked your box idea! Hope it works out for
you.
--SB
(this posted to both mail and news)

 
 
 

cutting bottles

Post by Timothy M Delling » Sat, 01 Mar 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
>I need to cut the top off triangular scotch bottles as I want to use
>the bottoms for jewelry boxes with stained glass lids.  I've tried the
>score and tap method with my normal diamond cutter with limited
>success.  Then I tried to make holes in them with an acetylene and
>oxegen torch this was an interesting exercise ( a couple bottles

You have all the right equiptment.  This is what I do to get the tops off
of beer bottles: (1) Score all the way around (I usually use a drill bit
made for glass, just because there are several lying around handy), then
(2) heat the score line with a small blowtorch, usually only two or three
revolutions, and (3) dunk in water.  Repeat (2) and (3) if it doesn't work
the first time.

--
--
"Everything I have ever done, I have done             Tim Dellinger

              -Irving Langmuir              http://www.cen.uiuc.edu/~tdelling

 
 
 

cutting bottles

Post by mikefi.. » Sat, 01 Mar 1997 04:00:00



<<  I've tried the score and tap method with my normal diamond cutter with limited
success.  >>

  A triangular bottle is going to be most difficult to cut evenly because of the varying thickness of the glass.   I would be tempted to try to take the bottle apart in stages.  When you say score and tap, you do not say if you used a special tapper, which you should.  If you did not, then make one from 1/4" steel rod and a *** ball.  Bend just the end of the rod at a right angle.  It may be easier to bend an inch or so and then cut off the extra.  It has got to fit down the neck of the bottle.  File the bent end to a blunt point.   Drill a guide hole in the *** ball so you can force it over the other end of the rod.   Adjust the position of the ball so when the ball is resting on the top of the bottle, the point of the bent part hits the line you are going to score.   You may have to bend the body of the rod to reach around the shoulder of the bottle. This will be harder with square or triangular bottles because of the varying distance from the neck to the score.

 If you find that you can properly score the sides but not the corners, use a triangular file to carve a line around the corner.   You may find it useful to disassemble the bottle, that is take the neck off, then use the increased access to remove the shoulder, then finally square up the top with easy access tapping.   Since the second and third cuts will be done on a previous worked bottle which will be very sharp, wear heavy leather or cut resistant gloves.

 If you find tapping does not let you run the score, consider using the hot tip of a fairly large soldering iron.  After scoring, touch the line with the iron and you may be able to follow the crack around the bottle.   This is what most of those dumb sounding string and nichrome wire tricks do.

 <<Then I tried to make holes in them with an acetylene and
oxegen torch this was an interesting exercise ( a couple bottles
shattered as they cooled). I have access to an LPG torch which
would'nt get as hot, could I use this somehow?  >>

  Actually, I am surprised the glass didn't shatter on the way up.  It doesn't matter what the torch is, it won't work.

 Mike Firth, Hot Bits furnace glassblowing newsletter

  Home Page: http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

cutting bottles

Post by archma.. » Sat, 01 Mar 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
>I need to cut the top off triangular scotch bottles as I want to use
>the bottoms for jewelry boxes with stained glass lids.

What a unique idea!  Now I guess I gotta start drinking scotch huh?  <sigh> I prefer a nice irish whiskey...but I'll make some sacrifices for my art. :)

Hmmm...I guess I could ask local bar owners.

Bryan "consider your idea appropriated for further development" Paschke

 
 
 

cutting bottles

Post by Vic Chane » Mon, 03 Mar 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
> I need to cut the top off triangular scotch bottles as I want to use
> the bottoms for jewelry boxes with stained glass lids.  I've tried
the
> score and tap method with my normal diamond cutter with limited
> success.

I have had repeated success with soaking some kite string in kerosene,
wrapping three layers around the bottle where you want it cut. You set
the kerosene on fire, let it burn for a little bit, then dunk the whole
thing in a bucket of water.
Ting! it breaks right on the line where the string was.
Vic