equipment needed for glass studio/casting, fusint, slumping?

equipment needed for glass studio/casting, fusint, slumping?

Post by Mike Firt » Sun, 10 Dec 1995 04:00:00



 The needs for glass working are different from casting from fusing are
different (somewhat) from slumping.
  For glass working annealing you can have a large space that you fill
progressively and then do the annealling cycle.  This need be heated no
more than 1,000F and requires a very good controller for the annealling
cycle timing.
  For casting you need a space large enough to hold the largest mold you
expect to use.  This must have enough elements to be heated to 1700-1800F.
 This must be controllable both on the rise (to keep the mold from
cracking and to dry out the mold, and on the fall (for annealling, which
can take days and weeks with larger castings) The requirements of poured
castings are somewhat different from patte de verre and cullet castings
(where the broken glass is arranged cold and then heated to the melting
point.)
  For fusing and especially for slumping, you normally want a much smaller
space and the elements should be all arranged on top.  Although an
annealler cycle is needed, far more important is control (including
visual) of what is happening at the peak temperature moments, when a
controlled slump or a more or less relief fuse is being done.  For a class
of 10-15 students, which is very large for this kind of activity unless
the students are made to use the same thickness of glass and roughly the
same arragement, I would expect that there be provided at a minimum one
slumping kiln for each two students, with one per student being ideal.  If
you can cycle the slumping/fusing kilns quickly and arrange the equipment
to allow removal of the glass to an annealling oven, then fewer kilns
would be possible.
  All of the hot boxes mentioned above can be built from a sheet metal
chassis lined with 1900F ceramic fiber about 4" thick.  The elements are
standard coil nichrome or Kanthal elements pinned to the fiber with "bobby
pins" of the same wire.  For a multiple kiln pickup, a multi controller
system like Digitry's GB4 becomes cost effective.    
  The best design for slumping/fusing I have seen involves building an
inverted kiln: the "lid" is actually a complete box lacking a floor and
the elements are mounted up inside.  The upper box is mounted on counter
weighted wires or arms. The bottom of the kiln is flat and mounted on
tracks or otherwise moveable.  For each upper box there are three or more
lower decks.  The cold glass is arranged on a lower deck and moved under
the upper box, which is lowered and brought to full heat. Meanwhile , more
glass is arranged on another deck.  When the glass is properly
slumped/fused, the upper box is removed and without losing much of the
heat inside, is lowered on the new deck.  The hot deck cools rapidly,
which it has to do to avoid devitrification, and is moved under (or into)
the annealling temp box, which is built to hold several hot decks.
 > Reply to:

Subject: Advice :re equipment needed for glass studio/casting,fusing,slumping?
--
Mike Firth     Dallas Texas    Hot Bits Glassblowing Newsletter
 
 
 

equipment needed for glass studio/casting, fusint, slumping?

Post by Enriqu » Sat, 16 Dec 1995 04:00:00


I am extremely interested in learning about glass art.  I am a
complete beginner.  I was wondering if you could reccomend any
schools/programs or any advice you could possibly give me.  Or
if you know of anywhere I could get some sort of apprenticeship
or internship !!!!!!!!  any reply would be greatly appreciated
amanda faye stafford
710 lafayette street
lafayette la  70506

 
 
 

equipment needed for glass studio/casting, fusint, slumping?

Post by MikeFir » Sat, 16 Dec 1995 04:00:00



Quote:

>I am extremely interested in learning about glass art.  I am a
>complete beginner.  I was wondering if you could reccomend any
>schools/programs or any advice you could possibly give me.  Or
>if you know of anywhere I could get some sort of apprenticeship
>or internship !!!!!!!!  any reply would be greatly appreciated
>amanda faye stafford

 Begin by contacting the Jean Blair, New Orleans School of GlassWorks and
Gallery, 727 Magazine Street, New Orleans LA 70130, 1-505-529-7277 which
does some training and uses interns after they have trained elsewhere  and
the Art Program at Tulane.  The former is mostly glassblowing and takes
apprentices and the latter is a college program with an emphasis on
casting.
  There are a lot of people who something about glass that would like to
do this kind of thing, so the chances for an untrained person are lowered.
 You might contact Texas Tech University in Lubbock, which has a glass
program as well as a graduate summer refresher course.  Other places to
contact include Penland School of Crafts in Penland North Carolina, which
is likely to be easier for a poor person without much roots to attend for
the time they want you than it is for someone anchored to a job.
    Both of the following, in Tennessee have programs in hot glass.
 Curtiss Brock Appalachian Center For Crafts Route 3, Box 435 Smithville
TN 37166
 Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts Box 567  Gatlinburg TN 37738
  If you are interested in cold glass, there are no programs known to me
and a recent request by someone else for information yielded no on-line
responses.