Glass Bead Making Kits

Glass Bead Making Kits

Post by Wendy Van Cam » Mon, 16 Jun 1997 04:00:00



I have not worked with glass before, but am becoming interested in
making  glass lampworked beads.  I bought a book called "Making Glass
Beads" which was recommended to me and feel that the instructions are
easy to follow.

I noticed that there are several kits on the market that will give you a
hothead torch and other supplies and am considering getting one.  Is
this the way to go?  Am I better off going a different route?  If the
kit is the best way to get started, can anyone recommend a good one to
me.

Thanks!
--


IndigoSkye Bead Fashions
http://www.cruznet.net/~indigo/beads.htm

 
 
 

Glass Bead Making Kits

Post by Donald R. McKinne » Mon, 16 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I have not worked with glass before, but am becoming interested in
> making  glass lampworked beads.  I bought a book called "Making Glass
> Beads" which was recommended to me and feel that the instructions are
> easy to follow.

> I noticed that there are several kits on the market that will give you a
> hothead torch and other supplies and am considering getting one.  Is
> this the way to go?  Am I better off going a different route?  If the
> kit is the best way to get started, can anyone recommend a good one to
> me.

> Thanks!
> --


> IndigoSkye Bead Fashions
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/~indigo/beads.htm

Wendy,

I would suggest that before you invest in any equipment, take a glass
beadmaking class. Alot of instructors, today, will have both a Minor
Burner and a Hot Head torch on hand, or at least full knowledge of both,
to help with your decision making. This is not to say that you can't
learn from a book, video, or even on your own but, it is hard to beat
hands on training. Good luck and be aware - glass bead making is
extremely ***ive!

Don McKinney
The Glass Palette Studio and Gallery

 
 
 

Glass Bead Making Kits

Post by sculpt » Tue, 17 Jun 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

>> I have not worked with glass before, but am becoming interested in
>> making  glass lampworked beads.  I bought a book called "Making Glass
>> Beads" which was recommended to me and feel that the instructions are
>> easy to follow.

>> I noticed that there are several kits on the market that will give you a
>> hothead torch and other supplies and am considering getting one.  Is
>> this the way to go?  Am I better off going a different route?  If the
>> kit is the best way to get started, can anyone recommend a good one to
>> me.

>> Thanks!
>> --


>> IndigoSkye Bead Fashions
>> http://www.FoundCollection.com/~indigo/beads.htm

>Wendy,

>I would suggest that before you invest in any equipment, take a glass
>beadmaking class. Alot of instructors, today, will have both a Minor
>Burner and a Hot Head torch on hand, or at least full knowledge of both,
>to help with your decision making. This is not to say that you can't
>learn from a book, video, or even on your own but, it is hard to beat
>hands on training. Good luck and be aware - glass bead making is
>extremely ***ive!

>Don McKinney
>The Glass Palette Studio and Gallery

Hi Wendy,
I have to agree with Don;s advice, it is a WHOLE lot easier to learn
to make glass beads with the help of an instructor. I taught myself
how to make glass beads, but, I have quite a bit of time available to
me. I would say that I spent several months just learning the basics
that an instructor could cover in just a few days. If time and money
is not a consideration, then by all means get one of the kits from
Arrow Springs, lay in a supply of glass and set to burning glass!  

A Hot Head kit from Arrow Springs will cost you $67.95 plus MAPP gas
($8.00 per 1lb cylinder - 2 to 4 hours depending), plus glass, plus
tools, plus something to anneal your beads with, etc., about $125 -
150 .
-or-
A Minor burner set up will run $276.95 plus all of the above, plus an
oxygen tank and propane tank - easily $400 with this route.

I was very sure that I wanted to work with hot glass when I started to
make glass beads. I decided that I would spend what I had to in order
to do this (the pawn shop sees my VCR more than I do!)  I am now using
the Minor and I love it, but, it took me about a year to fully explore
the limitations of the Hot Head.

In case you wondered, I recommend Arrow Springs because they
specialize in lampworking supplies, their prices are reasonable, the
staff is frendly and knowledgable and as an extra added bonus - they
have their catalog on the Web:

http://www.FoundCollection.com/~flameon/

One more thing, Cindy Jenkins book "Making Glass Beads" is superb. I
have never seen a more complete, concise treatment of the broad range
of techniques and trick than in this wonderful volume. Read it several
times!

Sculptor - Art can't hurt you, the artist might.

 
 
 

Glass Bead Making Kits

Post by Mary » Wed, 25 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I have not worked with glass before, but am becoming interested in
> making  glass lampworked beads.  I bought a book called "Making Glass
> Beads" which was recommended to me and feel that the instructions are
> easy to follow.

> I noticed that there are several kits on the market that will give you a
> hothead torch and other supplies and am considering getting one.  Is
> this the way to go?  Am I better off going a different route?  If the
> kit is the best way to get started, can anyone recommend a good one to
> me.

> Thanks!
> --

> IndigoSkye Bead Fashions
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/~indigo/beads.htm

Hi!

I'll agree with the others that glass beadmaking is EXTREMELY ***ive!
If there are no classes in your area, another good way to learn is from
some of the videos available. Frantz Beads out of Washington is another
good source for flameworking supplies, tips, etc. Good luck!

Frantz beads  360 426 6712 (I believe they also have a web site)

 
 
 

Glass Bead Making Kits

Post by Roger Peterso » Sat, 28 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Mary, Wendy,

Just spent a week at Gossamere Glass Studio with Brian Kerkvliet,
Patricia Frantz, Bandhu Scott Dunham et al.  All seemed to agree that
Cindy Jenkins new book "Making Glass Beads" was one of the best we had
seen recently.  It shows the bead during the process in a step-by-step
method.  All of this is in color pictures.

BTW, I took Brian's class on lampworking and have not been so exhausted
in years!! It was a fantastic class -- six intensive days -- well worth
the cost.  We covered a WIDE range of glass working techniques -- and
never picked up a bead mandrel once.  It really widened my view of
lampworking.

And Wendy, welcome to the world of hot glass.  Once bitten, you will
never look back.

Take care,

Roger...