Glass to Glass Glue?

Glass to Glass Glue?

Post by Paul Wils » Thu, 29 May 1997 04:00:00




Quote:
>Hi.   I am looking for a good permenant glue that is used for  bonding
>glass to glass.  Where can I find it?  Thanks for any suggestions!

I am not sure what you want.  There is no such thing as a permanent
glass glue other than high heat.  There are glues used to hold mosaic
pieces in place and glues that are used to spot glass pieces for
fusing.  What are you going to use it for?

Paul

 
 
 

Glass to Glass Glue?

Post by Stormy71 » Fri, 30 May 1997 04:00:00


Hi.   I am looking for a good permenant glue that is used for  bonding
glass to glass.  Where can I find it?  Thanks for any suggestions!

 
 
 

Glass to Glass Glue?

Post by d.. » Sat, 31 May 1997 04:00:00



Quote:


> >>Hi.   I am looking for a good permenant glue that is used for  bonding
> >>glass to glass.  Where can I find it?  Thanks for any suggestions!

> >I am not sure what you want.  There is no such thing as a permanent
> >glass glue other than high heat.

sorry, Paul, but that's not entirely correct. That said, though, I'm not
entirely sure of the glue manufacturer's company name anymore. There's at
least one company that makes an excellent, very strong glass glue (it's
been some years now, but seems like it might be DuPont, or 3M in
Minnestota) - they make an EXCELLENT 3-part glass glue, capable of holding
together small sheets of various tinted pieces of plate glass in "stratas"
through an entire hand glass beveling and polishing process (which
involves substantial pressures, water, abrasives, some minor vibrations,
and even some minor heat during final polishing). Friends of mine used to
grind out "trick" beveled glass "art objects" made from multi-layer glass
"chunks" using this glue...It is first mixed, and comes out clear as
water, then, maybe (I forget) ultraviolet (or sunlight) is used to cure
it...

pretty dern strong stuff, made for industrial use....(probably not exactly
"sold everywhere", but available nonetheless...)

the original poster also might want to look into rear-view mirror
adhesives....the types used to "stick" one to the windshield....

dave the hand beveler guy

BTW, like Paul said, our knowing what sizes, types, and shapes of glass
you wanted to glue together WHY would help lots...

Newsserver access is difficult here lately - please reply by direct e-mail.
Please try to at least quote back some of my text in your reply ...

I'm in Gainesville, north central Florida. If we're discussing commerce,
I'd sure appreciate knowing what city and/or state you'r in, to help
determine if it'd be possible to do business in person ....

thanks,

dave

 
 
 

Glass to Glass Glue?

Post by MikeFir » Mon, 02 Jun 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

>Hi.   I am looking for a good permenant glue that is used for  bonding
>glass to glass.  Where can I find it?  Thanks for any suggestions!

  In spite of the obfustication of the first reply on the net, I assume
you are looking for something
like one of the UV curing epoxies, which are available in small quantities
at hardware stores
(Crystal Clear brand) and in larger quantities as Hxtal [Conservation
Materials Ltd.  , P.O.Box 2884, Sparks NV 98432, 702-331-0582, FAX:
702-331-0588, HXTAL epoxy, adhesives]
  In both cases, the epoxy is a clear liquid which sets clear and has a
very long working time.  It is
then cured/set by exposure to UV light, from the sun or from special lamps
that can range down to a
pencil size unit for special needs (like bonding caps to teeth.)
 Mike Firth, Hot Bits furnace glassblowing newsletter

  Home Page: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/MikeFirth
 
 
 

Glass to Glass Glue?

Post by Lee Althous » Mon, 02 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hi.   I am looking for a good permenant glue that is used for  bonding
> glass to glass.  Where can I find it?  Thanks for any suggestions!

Hi, No glue "really" works on glass, however I found that Kemxert ultra-
violet glue seems to work the best. Any Stained Glass Supplier
(including myself) has it. In a pinch, Krazy Klue also works. But as I
stated in the beginning, none really works. Even the slightest pressure
and it will come apart.
Hope this helps
Lee Althouse
Althouse Stained Glass
www.art-n-glass.com
 
 
 

Glass to Glass Glue?

Post by Bert Wei » Mon, 02 Jun 1997 04:00:00



Quote:



>>Hi.   I am looking for a good permenant glue that is used for  bonding
>>glass to glass.  Where can I find it?  Thanks for any suggestions!

>  In spite of the obfustication of the first reply on the net, I assume
>you are looking for something
>like one of the UV curing epoxies, which are available in small quantities
>at hardware stores
>(Crystal Clear brand) and in larger quantities as Hxtal [Conservation
>Materials Ltd.  , P.O.Box 2884, Sparks NV 98432, 702-331-0582, FAX:
>702-331-0588, HXTAL epoxy, adhesives]
>  In both cases, the epoxy is a clear liquid which sets clear and has a
>very long working time.  It is
>then cured/set by exposure to UV light, from the sun or from special lamps
>that can range down to a
>pencil size unit for special needs (like bonding caps to teeth.)
> Mike Firth, Hot Bits furnace glassblowing newsletter

>  Home Page: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/MikeFirth

I have used both kinds of glue. For a simple job I recommend uv glue.
Hextal is a two part epoxy that takes a week to set up. This is
recommended for important restoration. Hextal is the purest epoxy
manufactured and has the highest resistance to turning yellow. Last time I
checked, a  gallon cost $1000, however you can buy a $60 pack. If you
dan't care about clarity try pc7.

--
Bert Weiss Glass Studio
Painted Art Glass
Custom Productions
Architectural and Sculptural Cast Glass
Collaborative Art Glass
Lighting design

 
 
 

Glass to Glass Glue?

Post by MikeFir » Tue, 03 Jun 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

>But as I
>stated in the beginning, none really works. Even the slightest pressure
>and it will come apart.

 I think you had better qualify this a bunch, since there are UV epoxied
art pieces out there that sold for thousands of dollars (glass spheres
with dichroic in the center that were ground after they were glued, 6 foot
tall assemblages of layers of 1/4" window glass) that are being moved all
over the country and aren't coming apart under "the slightest pressure"
 Mike Firth, Hot Bits furnace glassblowing newsletter

  Home Page: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/MikeFirth
 
 
 

Glass to Glass Glue?

Post by Rick Sherber » Tue, 03 Jun 1997 04:00:00


I've had some experience with Hxtal and another called Dymax.

Hxtal is a 2 part adhesive that is expensive and needs to be weighed out
in the proper proportion.  A good gram scale is necessary.  The stuff
holds amazingly well.  I've repaired large Murano sculptures with it.
The down side is it takes quite a while to set up (a week or so).  Hxtal
is *not* a UV cure adhesive as someone mentioned earlier.

Dymax makes a 1 part UV cure or a 2 part epoxy for opaque areas.  Also
very strong on a glass/glass bond.

I've heard from some other folks that Hxtal does yellow somewhat over
time and they claim that Dymax doesn't.

Loctite also makes a UV cure glass adhesive, although I haven't used it,
I know several big guns that do.

All of these are *very* strong on a glass/glass bond.  I have a friend
who assembles large (3+ ft.) vase sculptures with Dymax.  He knocked on
over once and all the glass shattered, but the glue joints held firm.
UV adhesives generally require perfectly mated surfaces to hold well.
Hxtal will fill voids.

 
 
 

Glass to Glass Glue?

Post by Brad Pearso » Tue, 03 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I've had some experience with Hxtal and another called Dymax.

> Hxtal is a 2 part adhesive that is expensive and needs to be weighed out
> in the proper proportion.  A good gram scale is necessary.  The stuff
> holds amazingly well.  I've repaired large Murano sculptures with it.
> The down side is it takes quite a while to set up (a week or so).  Hxtal
> is *not* a UV cure adhesive as someone mentioned earlier.

> Dymax makes a 1 part UV cure or a 2 part epoxy for opaque areas.  Also
> very strong on a glass/glass bond.

> I've heard from some other folks that Hxtal does yellow somewhat over
> time and they claim that Dymax doesn't.

> Loctite also makes a UV cure glass adhesive, although I haven't used it,
> I know several big guns that do.

> All of these are *very* strong on a glass/glass bond.  I have a friend
> who assembles large (3+ ft.) vase sculptures with Dymax.  He knocked on
> over once and all the glass shattered, but the glue joints held firm.
> UV adhesives generally require perfectly mated surfaces to hold well.
> Hxtal will fill voids.

I would have to agree with Rick on the Dymax glue, I've glued up pieces
with it then changed my mind and could not get them apart for the life
of me.
        To get good glueing surfaces I would suggest a diamond or some other
abrasive lapping wheel for both side of the glue joint.I have found
there website for yall its http://www.dymax.com.

By the way Its nice to see a familiar face around here Rick,  you might
not remember me but weve met at several shows.
Ive got a studio in Richmond down the road from you.

Brad

 
 
 

Glass to Glass Glue?

Post by Lee Althous » Tue, 10 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Quote:



> >But as I
> >stated in the beginning, none really works. Even the slightest pressure
> >and it will come apart.

>  I think you had better qualify this a bunch, since there are UV epoxied
> art pieces out there that sold for thousands of dollars (glass spheres
> with dichroic in the center that were ground after they were glued, 6 foot
> tall assemblages of layers of 1/4" window glass) that are being moved all
> over the country and aren't coming apart under "the slightest pressure"
>  Mike Firth, Hot Bits furnace glassblowing newsletter

>   Home Page: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/MikeFirth

I was referring to single layer glass panels where two pieces of glass
where glue on the edges to each other which is what I assumed (and I
assumed correctly, because the person posing the question email his
"thanks" to me) the original question was. He was not referring to
multi-layered 6' globes or three dimensional sculptures of glass.
I have found in single layer glass work that NO glue will hold. Maybe
for a year or two, but sooner or later it is apart again.
Also, when you wish to pick apart a reply, list the entire message so
others will be able to see that the reply WAS referring to single layer
glass and not some speciality or industrial item.
Lee Althouse
Althouse Stained Glass Studio
www.art-n-glass.com
 
 
 

Glass to Glass Glue?

Post by Bert Wei » Thu, 12 Jun 1997 04:00:00



Quote:




>> >But as I
>> >stated in the beginning, none really works. Even the slightest pressure
>> >and it will come apart.

>>  I think you had better qualify this a bunch, since there are UV epoxied
>> art pieces out there that sold for thousands of dollars (glass spheres
>> with dichroic in the center that were ground after they were glued, 6 foot
>> tall assemblages of layers of 1/4" window glass) that are being moved all
>> over the country and aren't coming apart under "the slightest pressure"
>>  Mike Firth, Hot Bits furnace glassblowing newsletter

>>   Home Page: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/MikeFirth
>I was referring to single layer glass panels where two pieces of glass
>where glue on the edges to each other which is what I assumed (and I
>assumed correctly, because the person posing the question email his
>"thanks" to me) the original question was. He was not referring to
>multi-layered 6' globes or three dimensional sculptures of glass.
>I have found in single layer glass work that NO glue will hold. Maybe
>for a year or two, but sooner or later it is apart again.
>Also, when you wish to pick apart a reply, list the entire message so
>others will be able to see that the reply WAS referring to single layer
>glass and not some speciality or industrial item.
>Lee Althouse
>Althouse Stained Glass Studio
>www.art-n-glass.com

Three or four years ago I did a job that involved a few  broken pieces of
thin glass that had 19th century enameled glass paintings on them.  I used
hextal to glue them edge to edge.  Some of the broken panels were in many
small pieces, and some in two or three  large pieces.  These panels were
glazed in a wooden door.  The Hextal took a week to set up and was a real
pain to handle while it was setting up.  It was possible to adjust the
pieces as they set up. I had them laid out on silicone release paper,
which does not stick to the glue. The final clean up was with a razor
blade.  The glue set up, but the panels looked like glued back together
glass.  I glazed them back into the door, and I haven't heard from the
client since about any failure of the glued glass to stay together.  This
was not enjoyable work, but it did save the panels from the trash.
Bert Weiss

--
Bert Weiss Glass Studio
Painted Art Glass
Custom Productions
Architectural and Sculptural Cast Glass
Collaborative Art Glass
Lighting design