Soldering. What am I doing wrong?

Soldering. What am I doing wrong?

Post by Rosemarie Smi » Sat, 18 Nov 1995 04:00:00



I've been making stained glass projects for myself and friends for about
4 years now. My biggest dissatisfaction with my work is my soldering.
It's lumpy or wrinkled or rough-textured. I've never been able to develop
the right technique and I'm thinking there might be some
magical formula/technique that I am not aware of that will make my soldering
smooth and uniform.

Also, when I use the copper patina on my projects I don't get a shiny
copper look. I get more of a dark almost blackish gray look, even after
using steel wool to rub off the dull coat on the solder. If I put the
patina on immediately after soldering then I get the shiny copper look.
But I can't always get around to immediately putting the patina on after
I've soldered, especially on a big project.

Any advice would be appreciated,

Rosemarie Smith

 
 
 

Soldering. What am I doing wrong?

Post by Gary Packar » Sat, 18 Nov 1995 04:00:00



Quote:
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> Newsgroups: rec.crafts.glass
> Subject: Soldering. What am I doing wrong?
> Date: 17 Nov 1995 22:13:56 GMT
> Organization: University of Guelph
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> I've been making stained glass projects for myself and friends for about
> 4 years now. My biggest dissatisfaction with my work is my soldering.
> It's lumpy or wrinkled or rough-textured. I've never been able to develop
> the right technique and I'm thinking there might be some
> magical formula/technique that I am not aware of that will make my soldering
> smooth and uniform.

> Also, when I use the copper patina on my projects I don't get a shiny
> copper look. I get more of a dark almost blackish gray look, even after
> using steel wool to rub off the dull coat on the solder. If I put the
> patina on immediately after soldering then I get the shiny copper look.
> But I can't always get around to immediately putting the patina on after
> I've soldered, especially on a big project.

> Any advice would be appreciated,

> Rosemarie Smith


First of all you should try 63/37 solder.  It is a mixture that has no mushy
range and will solidify nicely if undisturbed.  Tin each piece before you
solder them together.  Use as little flux as possible.  Practice moving the
iron and the hand feeding the solder into the tip at a rate that the iron can
keep up with.  Practice.  Practice.  Practice.  You can go over the solder
line once it has solidified to smooth it out.  Sometimes the problem is that
not enough solder was used to run the bead.

As to your second problem, you should apply patina as soon after soldering as
possible.  The solder is made up of tin and lead, both of which immediately
begin to form oxides on the surface as soon as it solidifies.  After applying
patina you can also apply finishing compound that will give the patina a shiny
look.

Gary Packard - Glasscrafters

 
 
 

Soldering. What am I doing wrong?

Post by Michael Sava » Sun, 19 Nov 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

>I've been making stained glass projects for myself and friends for about
>4 years now. My biggest dissatisfaction with my work is my soldering.
>It's lumpy or wrinkled or rough-textured. I've never been able to develop
>the right technique and I'm thinking there might be some
>magical formula/technique that I am not aware of that will make my soldering
>smooth and uniform.

>Also, when I use the copper patina on my projects I don't get a shiny
>copper look. I get more of a dark almost blackish gray look, even after
>using steel wool to rub off the dull coat on the solder. If I put the
>patina on immediately after soldering then I get the shiny copper look.
>But I can't always get around to immediately putting the patina on after
>I've soldered, especially on a big project.

>Any advice would be appreciated,

>Rosemarie Smith


Ok to lets start with soldering.  Are you using any flux? how hot is you
iron, also how many watts is it? I use a 50w unger which heats to about
1200 degrees.  What kind of solder are you using?  Generally you start
with a base coat of 50-50 solid core, to fill gaps etc. then follow up
with 60-40 (becuase it's cheaper than quickset or ultimate).  When
creating a nice bead you do the folling: Start by refluxing, (a quick
tip, never dip your brush directly in the bottle or you will contaminate
the entire bottle.  Instead pour some into a smaller container and use it
from there.)  When you begin you soldering, there are many ways to
solder, one way is to keep your iron floating above the surface about
1/16" or so.  Feed the 60-40 into the iron and trace the seem.  Try to do
it only once (or you make get bleed through, cracked glass, messy bead,
etc). With some practice you can get some pretty nice beads..

As for patina: What brand are you using?  are you using liquid or paste
flux, if your using paste flux stop using it's difficult to clean off
(however here's another tip: i personally hav'nt tried this, but, if you
have to leave your project for a while, and can't patina right away apply
the paste flux to the solder and it acts like a seal.)  Ok here's what i
do: after i solder and it's cool to touch, i wash it in plain water
first, to knock off solder balls etc. Then with a nail brush use Joy and
Baking Soda mix to wah the piece. The baking soda is suposed to
nuetralize the flux.  Wash the piece very well so it's nice and clean.  
Dry the piece well.  I use Novacan patina (i found it works best), apply
it with a brush or a cloth you do want anymore (i use an old tooth brush
for this).  (Another tip:  Try not to use cloth if you can, i found when
using copper patina, after a few days, the cloth just atarts to
disintagrate, which also means DONT GET ANY ON YOUR CLOTHES.  Clean the
project again like staed above and dry.  Polish the piece: i use
semi-chrome first, then use a coat of chemi-pro finishing compound. and
it's done

As for Jax patina: you may have heard about this stuff, it is expensive
stuff, but i think well worth it.  the main problem with it is the piece
has to be very very clean to work right, (i tried using that cj's cleaner
stuff it never works for me, so i dont even bother using it). but from
what i can tell it has'nt tarnished on any of my pieces yet, unlike other
patina's which turn brown to black over a time.

hope this helps...

---Mike Savad

 
 
 

Soldering. What am I doing wrong?

Post by GlasLass » Mon, 20 Nov 1995 04:00:00


Regarding your problem with copper patina.  The most important thing is
that the surface be clean and free from oxidation when the patina is
applied.  After washing the piece (I use C&J's and have had great
results), let it dry.  No news there...Here is the big secret!  Rub the
solder lightly with 0000 brass (preferred because it won't rust) or steel
wool.  This removes the light oxidation film which develops on the solder
and gives a smooth, clean surface for the patina.  It will take
beautifully!  Then, use a waxing product to finish the piece.  Goodluck!
Teresa

*****************************************
            Teresa Vaughn
            Color It Glass!
"Fine Artistry in Stained Glass"
*****************************************

 
 
 

Soldering. What am I doing wrong?

Post by Leonard » Thu, 07 Dec 1995 04:00:00


There is a link to soldering techniques in Leonardo Park at

http://www.hobbies.com

It is under metalwork, how.  Leonardo Park links hobbies, collectibles,
anc crafts on the internet.  I am looking for people who would like to be
board members and supervise a particular site for content and accuracy
such as handicrafts, glass.  Please send your name or any additional


Quote:
> Regarding your problem with copper patina.  The most important thing is
> that the surface be clean and free from oxidation when the patina is
> applied.  After washing the piece (I use C&J's and have had great
> results), let it dry.  No news there...Here is the big secret!  Rub the
> solder lightly with 0000 brass (preferred because it won't rust) or steel
> wool.  This removes the light oxidation film which develops on the solder
> and gives a smooth, clean surface for the patina.  It will take
> beautifully!  Then, use a waxing product to finish the piece.  Goodluck!
> Teresa

> *****************************************
>             Teresa Vaughn
>             Color It Glass!
> "Fine Artistry in Stained Glass"
> *****************************************