Tiffany Lamps

Tiffany Lamps

Post by Mik » Wed, 28 Jan 1998 04:00:00



My experience with stain glass started in Oct 97. Since I have made 1 piece
using lead came and 2 with foil. I am considering now a Tiffany lamp. From a
vendor catalog I totaled up the initial costs of whats required, and it's
quite large. For you that have been there, can you relate your preference on
either the Odyssey or Worden systems?
Thanks
Mike  

 
 
 

Tiffany Lamps

Post by Steve Richar » Wed, 28 Jan 1998 04:00:00




Quote:
>My experience with stain glass started in Oct 97. Since I have made 1 piece
>using lead came and 2 with foil. I am considering now a Tiffany lamp. From a
>vendor catalog I totaled up the initial costs of whats required, and it's
>quite large. For you that have been there, can you relate your preference on
>either the Odyssey or Worden systems?
>Thanks
>Mike  

Mike,
I'd suggest you try some panel lamps first.  the outlay on forms etc is
minimal.  For my first it was crumpled newspaper in the bottom of a
bucket to hold the panels together while I tack soldered the insides of
the panels together.

I have made lamp moulds from papier mache which are just as good as the
expensive systems, and have tailor made shapes. In other words, I think
these lamp systems are over-rated.

steve
--
Steve Richard

 
 
 

Tiffany Lamps

Post by Lee Althous » Wed, 28 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> My experience with stain glass started in Oct 97. Since I have made 1
> piece
> using lead came and 2 with foil. I am considering now a Tiffany lamp.
> From a
> vendor catalog I totaled up the initial costs of whats required, and
> it's
> quite large. For you that have been there, can you relate your
> preference on
> either the Odyssey or Worden systems?
> Thanks
> Mike

We used to sell both, now we only handle Worden. That kind of sums it
up.

Not too many people used Odyssey. I prefer Worden over Odyssey because
you work on the outside of the mold, which is what people will see when
it's finished and therefore you can correct pieces as you go.

Some make their own molds and more power to them, but worden molds are
very good. Also if you go with worden and you get the molds, get at
least two if the mold is only a sixth of the way around. It is easier to
"rotate " the first section keeping it on part of the mold and then
attaching the second section as you go, rather than doing six sections
and then attaching them. They usually don't line up when you do them
seperatly. If cost is no factor, go for the full molds. Also try making
you own designs instead of buying the prefab designs. It is not
difficult.

Hope this helps
Lee Althouse
Althouse Stained Glass
www.art-n-glass.com

 
 
 

Tiffany Lamps

Post by TarlaSt » Thu, 29 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>Some make their own molds and more power to them, but worden molds are
>very good. Also if you go with worden and you get the molds, get at
>least two if the mold is only a sixth of the way around. It is easier to
>"rotate " the first section keeping it on part of the mold and then
>attaching the second section as you go, rather than doing six sections
>and then attaching them. They usually don't line up when you do them
>seperatly. If cost is no factor, go for the full molds. Also try making
>you own designs instead of buying the prefab designs. It is not
>difficult.

As a matter of fact, Worden makes blank patterns that you can use to
create your own lamps. I covered the sections in the blank pattern
with clear Contact paper so that I can use the same blanks over and
over again. I just draw on my pattern, and when I'm done, I clean it
off and start a new one. A couple of tips about using Worden molds: if
you brush on a couple of layers of modge podge over the mold, then
cover it with a layer of aluminum foil, you can use the same mold over
and over many times. The foil distributes the heat from the iron over
a larger space so that you don't damage the mold and the modgepodge
keeps flux from eating it away and just plain making it ***. You can
attach the foil by using those short flathead pins that dressmakers
use. (the same ones used to attach the pattern to the mold.)

***Reverend Mutha Tarla Star***
As long as men keep thinking with their***s,
women will keep ***ing with their heads.
//www.ionet.net/~bmyers/homepage.html

 
 
 

Tiffany Lamps

Post by Steve Richar » Sat, 31 Jan 1998 04:00:00




Quote:

<snip>
> A couple of tips about using Worden molds: if
>you brush on a couple of layers of modge podge over the mold,
<snip>

What is modge podge?

--
Steve Richard

 
 
 

Tiffany Lamps

Post by TarlaSt » Sun, 01 Feb 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

><snip>
>> A couple of tips about using Worden molds: if
>>you brush on a couple of layers of modge podge over the mold,
><snip>

>What is modge podge?

It's a***based modelling compound. It can be found in most craft
and hobby stores.
"See that burning monk? I think he;s trying to say that no matter
how bad the pain is you can still keep your shit together. Now
cut off one of his fingers and let's light a joint with it."
 -- Janor Hypercleats
 
 
 

Tiffany Lamps

Post by GeeHa » Thu, 05 Feb 1998 04:00:00


"Not too many people used Odyssey. I prefer Worden over Odyssey because
you work on the outside of the mold, which is what people will see when
it's finished and therefore you can correct pieces as you go."

Aren't you confusing Odyssey forms with Rainbow forms.  The Odyssey is a sturdy
fiberglass form with the pattern etched on the outside.  The glass is
positioned with tacky wax.  The Worden form is a sturdy foam form on which
glass pieces are positioned with glass headed pins.  Both are excellent forms
and provide a large variety of shapes, sizes, and patterns.

 
 
 

Tiffany Lamps

Post by Lee Althous » Thu, 05 Feb 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> "Not too many people used Odyssey. I prefer Worden over Odyssey
> because
> you work on the outside of the mold, which is what people will see
> when
> it's finished and therefore you can correct pieces as you go."

> Aren't you confusing Odyssey forms with Rainbow forms.  The Odyssey is
> a sturdy
> fiberglass form with the pattern etched on the outside.  The glass is
> positioned with tacky wax.  The Worden form is a sturdy foam form on
> which
> glass pieces are positioned with glass headed pins.  Both are
> excellent forms
> and provide a large variety of shapes, sizes, and patterns.

I stand corrected. It could be Rainbow. I had all three in the studio
for sale and only Worden molds sold. I never used the others because
Worden's is what I learned on.We try to stay away from making
lampshades. Too time consuming for the eventual sale price. Besides, we
are always doing at least four or five churches at the same time and
have little time left for lamps and suncather type novelties.

Lee Althouse
Althouse Stained Glass
www.art-n-glass.com

 
 
 

Tiffany Lamps

Post by The Anthony » Fri, 06 Feb 1998 04:00:00


<SNIP>
 Besides, we

Quote:
> are always doing at least four or five churches at the same time and
> have little time left for lamps and suncather type novelties.

> Lee Althouse
> Althouse Stained Glass
> www.art-n-glass.com

Lee, Church windows are the fine and ancient art that the words "stained
glass" usually refers to, but I sure hope you didn't mean to diss the
equally fine art of the Tiffany style lamp shade!
        trying hard to say this with a <grin>,
        --SB
        member, Association of Stained Glass Lamp Artists
        see some nice lamps here:
        http://www.geocities.com/Paris/LeftBank/9940/lampshow.html
 
 
 

Tiffany Lamps

Post by Lee Althous » Fri, 06 Feb 1998 04:00:00


Quote:


> <SNIP>
>  Besides, we
> > are always doing at least four or five churches at the same time and

> > have little time left for lamps and suncather type novelties.

> > Lee Althouse
> > Althouse Stained Glass
> > www.art-n-glass.com

> Lee, Church windows are the fine and ancient art that the words
> "stained
> glass" usually refers to, but I sure hope you didn't mean to diss the
> equally fine art of the Tiffany style lamp shade!
>         trying hard to say this with a <grin>,
>         --SB
>         member, Association of Stained Glass Lamp Artists
>         see some nice lamps here:
>         http://www.geocities.com/Paris/LeftBank/9940/lampshow.html

No, not at all, They are just too time consuming for my studio. (Unless
of course my Studio was in Mexico) One local hobbyist who makes nothing
but free-form, non-patterned, one of a kind, using only "odd, expensive
glass" (as he refers to it) takes up to four or five months to make one
shade with over a thousand pieces. I know he only works on it for two or
three hours a day, but still with my studio overhead, the time factor
would kill me.Plus (as my employees say) I'm too fussy. I hate solder
lines that "grow" in width and that is usually a common by product of
free-form lamps.
Maybe when my site takes off, and I have a couple dozen people in here
and don't have to go to job sites (in other words retire) I'll start
making some.

Lee Althouse