Need help with technique

Need help with technique

Post by kk » Sun, 12 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Now and again, when I'm not stamping out confetti, I like to make simple
little whimsical animals to put in tableaux on rocks.  Because of the
heat of my hands, sometimes I have to bake them a little bit in order to
add clay for features, or the oval/ball I'm working with would melt
right over my fingertips.  But then, if I bake it even the least little
bit, I can't get the fresh clay to adhere to the slightly baked stuff,
thereby cancelling out any benefit baking gave me.  What can I use to
make the fresh/baked clay adhere to one another so I can get on with my
project, instead of worrying about having to look for a nose or ear on
the floor under my desk???

Kelly

 
 
 

Need help with technique

Post by Rebecca9 » Sun, 12 Jul 1998 04:00:00


I'm not a sculpter, so wiser heads may prevail, but try a drop of sculpey
diluent.  Jus a bit!

I have bought it at Michael's and Frank's, and I am pretty sure it is available
through WeeFolk, Prairiecraft, and the Clay Factory.

Becky Preston

 
 
 

Need help with technique

Post by Sandy Lemo » Sun, 12 Jul 1998 04:00:00


  Because of the

Quote:
>heat of my hands, sometimes I have to bake them a little bit in order to
>add clay for features, or the oval/ball I'm working with would melt
>right over my fingertips.

Now, don't laugh <g> it sounds silly, but it works for me.  You know
that canned air used to clean your computer?  Squirt the clay you want
cooled with a good dose of it. Doesn't hurt to spritz your fingertips
lightly, either.  It's not economical for extensive useage, but an
occcasional squirt just to put the finishing touches on a project it's
perfect.  I take off that long thin nozzle and use it without it.

You can get two cans of it at Sam's for about 7 bucks...you should be
cleaning your computers anyway <g>  Perfect excuse for a canned air
purchase.

Just an experience for me!

Sandy

 
 
 

Need help with technique

Post by kk » Sun, 12 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
> Now, don't laugh <g> it sounds silly, but it works for me.  You know
> that canned air used to clean your computer?  Squirt the clay you want
> cooled with a good dose of it.

Interesting idea, but not what I need -- I need to find out how to get raw
clay to adhere to baked clay!   But you're right, I should get some of the
compressed air, anyway!

Kelly

 
 
 

Need help with technique

Post by Glori » Sun, 12 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Hi Kelly.....If you know ahead of time where you are going to want the raw
clay to adhere to the baked clay it would possibly help to "rough" up the area
before baking....then when you get ready to apply the new clay there would be
something for it to "grip" to....and you might want to apply a small amount of
Sobo glue to the baked clay area.....

Don't know for sure that this would work...have never tried it....but just
thought I would toss the thought into the ring.

Have a good day.  Smiles,  Gloria

Quote:

> > Now, don't laugh <g> it sounds silly, but it works for me.  You know
> > that canned air used to clean your computer?  Squirt the clay you want
> > cooled with a good dose of it.

> Interesting idea, but not what I need -- I need to find out how to get raw
> clay to adhere to baked clay!   But you're right, I should get some of the
> compressed air, anyway!

> Kelly

 
 
 

Need help with technique

Post by P D RU » Sun, 12 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>Interesting idea, but not what I need -- I need to find out how to get raw
>clay to adhere to baked clay!   But you're right, I should get some of the
>compressed air, anyway!

>Kelly

I just did this last night. Didn't have a problem. It stuck fine. Of course, I
only baked for 5-10 minutes just to make the base stiff and not he whole baking
time.

But a little drop of water makes the fresh clay a bit sticky.

Dianne    >^..^<
Jacksonville, FL
http://members.aol.com/pdruss/index.html

 
 
 

Need help with technique

Post by Stephanie Michlin » Sun, 12 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Kelly,

I have used Sobo glue in the past.  It adhears, and the clays seem to bond to
each other through the glue when baking.
Let the glue dry first  :o)

Stephanie

Quote:

> > Now, don't laugh <g> it sounds silly, but it works for me.  You know
> > that canned air used to clean your computer?  Squirt the clay you want
> > cooled with a good dose of it.

> Interesting idea, but not what I need -- I need to find out how to get raw
> clay to adhere to baked clay!   But you're right, I should get some of the
> compressed air, anyway!

> Kelly

 
 
 

Need help with technique

Post by DABla » Sun, 12 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>I'm not a sculpter, so wiser heads may prevail, but try a drop of sculpey
>diluent.

Think also someone said that the Diluent holds best if you apply to both sides
then let it tack up for a minute before joining --otherwise the added bit can
slide.

Diane B.

 
 
 

Need help with technique

Post by Mamadu » Sun, 12 Jul 1998 04:00:00


To get raw clay to stick to baked clay, use a little "titch" of superglue.  If
you need a tiny spot, use a toothpick, fine needle, fine wire to "touch the
surface".  Superglue can be baked with no problem (and I know this for a fact
because I checked it out with the PikStik supplier---he even sent the range of
temperatures each glue:  slow, medium, and fast cure could take-----and they
were all over 275-degrees.  I have been doing this for a long, long time and
haven't lost a nose or an ear on a figure since I started.  
 
 
 

Need help with technique

Post by kk » Sun, 12 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Thanks!   Pic Stic is my absolute favorite s'glue...the others aren't even close.
(TCF has it)
Quote:

> To get raw clay to stick to baked clay, use a little "titch" of superglue.  If
> you need a tiny spot, use a toothpick, fine needle, fine wire to "touch the
> surface".  Superglue can be baked with no problem (and I know this for a fact
> because I checked it out with the PikStik supplier---he even sent the range of
> temperatures each glue:  slow, medium, and fast cure could take-----and they
> were all over 275-degrees.  I have been doing this for a long, long time and
> haven't lost a nose or an ear on a figure since I started.

 
 
 

Need help with technique

Post by scott & iren » Sun, 12 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
> What can I use to
> make the fresh/baked clay adhere to one another

When applied unbaked to baked clay, let them set overnight -- the unbaked
clay apparently leeches some plasticizer to the baked and makes a stronger
bond.

Irene in NC
--
to email, remove first x from address

 
 
 

Need help with technique

Post by Otterfi » Mon, 13 Jul 1998 04:00:00


it seems i read somewhere about using vaseline to stick soft clay to baked
clay...does that sound right?
 
 
 

Need help with technique

Post by el.. » Mon, 13 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> Now, don't laugh <g> it sounds silly, but it works for me.  You know
> that canned air used to clean your computer?  Squirt the clay you want
> cooled with a good dose of it.
> Sandy

Laugh?  Sandy I'm reaching through the computer to kiss you <VBG>...I
bought a half gazillion cans of that stuff when I was heavy into
photography and I found it the other day and dispaired that it would
probably lose its charge before I ever got to clean off another
negitive!  I LOVE THIS GROUP!!!
Carolyn
A (canned air happy) Jersey Girl
 
 
 

Need help with technique

Post by Vince Rhe » Mon, 13 Jul 1998 04:00:00


I use this canned air constantly.  I make Victorian lampshades (besides all
this claying) and it is the very best product for keeping them clean and
dust-free.  A fabric shade would last at least 30 years and look like new as
long as it is dusted with canned air once a week.  I use the canned air to
clean my work area completely when I change from fabrics to clay (I
incorporate clay and textiles together often, too)--no lint on my clay!
Jeanne
Quote:


> > Now, don't laugh <g> it sounds silly, but it works for me.  You know
> > that canned air used to clean your computer?  Squirt the clay you want
> > cooled with a good dose of it.
> > Sandy

> Laugh?  Sandy I'm reaching through the computer to kiss you <VBG>...I
> bought a half gazillion cans of that stuff when I was heavy into
> photography and I found it the other day and dispaired that it would
> probably lose its charge before I ever got to clean off another
> negitive!  I LOVE THIS GROUP!!!
> Carolyn
> A (canned air happy) Jersey Girl

 
 
 

Need help with technique

Post by Doracl » Mon, 13 Jul 1998 04:00:00


I picked up a good technique at a local guild meeting for getting  unbaked clay
(such as a small piece like a cane slice)  to stick to baked clay; use plastic
wrap; ie, Handy Wrap, Saran Wrap;  stretched taut over your thumb or forefinger
to smooth the unbaked clay onto  the baked clay...the plastic wrap keeps the
unbaked clay from sticking to your fingers...this method works well if your
goal is to 'blend' the unbaked clay to the baked surface; ie, you don't want
the unbaked piece to 'stand out'..or if your unbaked clay is translucent, and
you want the baked clay underneath to show through...it spreads the unbaked
clay very thinly...

I've also used a light coating of Sculpey Diluent, applied to the baked clay,
to 'stick on' unbaked clay pieces...this method works great if you want the
unbaked piece to "stick out", like the embellishments on "Baroque beads".  The
Sculpey Diluent helps bond the clays together when you rebake the object.  
Sculpey Diluent, again applied lightly to the baked clay, can also be used to
stick on larger unbaked sheets of clay.....

Recently I've started using Liquid Sculpey, brushed on baked clay to adhere
unbaked clay in the same way as I used the Diluent.. The LS creates an
especially strong bond, and adds 'weight' and 'strength' to the object.....

Dora from RI
member of NPCG and
Central New England Polymer Clay Guild