My website/polyclay stuff is online!

My website/polyclay stuff is online!

Post by LynnDe » Sun, 16 Jul 2000 04:00:00



Great work!  I love the Armor-All/Embossing powder beads and your
explanation.  The cat pins are intriguing, too.

Thanks for sharing!

LynnDel

Quote:
>Hi All,

>I want to thank everyone for their help
>on the star cane dillemma! As promised
>in my previous post, I got my polymer
>clay website online!

>Here is the url:

>http://www.geocities.com/ferryblue/

>I'd appreciate any comments on the site
>and my clay stuff!

>Take Care,

>Sharon


>Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
>Before you buy.

 
 
 

My website/polyclay stuff is online!

Post by Sharon S » Mon, 17 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Hi All,

I want to thank everyone for their help
on the star cane dillemma! As promised
in my previous post, I got my polymer
clay website online!

Here is the url:

http://www.geocities.com/ferryblue/

I'd appreciate any comments on the site
and my clay stuff!

Take Care,

Sharon


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

My website/polyclay stuff is online!

Post by Miracle >^,, » Mon, 17 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
Sharon S. wrote...
> http://www.geocities.com/ferryblue/

> I'd appreciate any comments on the site
> and my clay stuff!

    I think you have a wonderful eye for color composition!
I loved the variety of colors you used for your jewelry, and I
admire your patience in making all of those matched beads!

    I run out of enthusiasm too quickly when I need to make
several dozen beads.   :o}

    The purple/yellow/multi necklace was my favorite- it just
jumped off the page at me. Beautiful!   :o)

Miracle

 
 
 

My website/polyclay stuff is online!

Post by deb haye » Mon, 17 Jul 2000 04:00:00


the page is clean, fast and not 'foofie'.

your necklaces are GREAT.....no prices?   LOL

deb


Quote:
> Hi All,

> I want to thank everyone for their help
> on the star cane dillemma! As promised
> in my previous post, I got my polymer
> clay website online!

> Here is the url:

> http://www.geocities.com/ferryblue/

> I'd appreciate any comments on the site
> and my clay stuff!

> Take Care,

> Sharon


> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.

 
 
 

My website/polyclay stuff is online!

Post by lgee » Mon, 17 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Wow!  Very neat stuff!  The embossing powder technique was inspired!  
Your cat pins are quite cute, too.  Are you using a stamp, cookie
cutter, or other technique for those?
I can't wait to see what else you end up doing and posting!

Linda G.

Seattle, WA

Quote:

> Hi All,

> I want to thank everyone for their help
> on the star cane dillemma! As promised
> in my previous post, I got my polymer
> clay website online!

> Here is the url:

> http://www.geocities.com/ferryblue/

> I'd appreciate any comments on the site
> and my clay stuff!

> Take Care,

> Sharon


> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.

 
 
 

My website/polyclay stuff is online!

Post by rosi » Mon, 17 Jul 2000 04:00:00


your beads are just beautiful!
your website is set up really nicely!

--
read and post daily, it works!
rosie
http://www.geocities.com/readandpost/ROSIE.html

Getting our worries out in the open and talking about
them with people whose judgment we trust keeps us
grounded in reality.


Quote:
> Hi All,

> I want to thank everyone for their help
> on the star cane dillemma! As promised
> in my previous post, I got my polymer
> clay website online!

> Here is the url:

> http://www.geocities.com/ferryblue/

> I'd appreciate any comments on the site
> and my clay stuff!

> Take Care,

> Sharon


> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.

 
 
 

My website/polyclay stuff is online!

Post by M.K. Park » Mon, 17 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Very nice. I was taken with the earrings, the way they were all
different from each other
mavis
 
 
 

My website/polyclay stuff is online!

Post by Sharon S » Tue, 18 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Wow!! I am delighted that so many of you
took the time to look at my pages! Thank
you all for your kind words.

I'll answer a few questions now that I got in some of the
e-mails about my work!

1. My cat pins - I cut those out by hand from an original
that I made. I made the 1st one, and was so pleased with
the shape that I use it as a template. I do still cut new ones
from scratch though too!

2. Someone said "What! No prices?" - Hm - I'll have to give
that some thought about serious selling. For now, if you've
taken an interest in a piece and would like to buy or want to
know the price, you can send me an e-mail letting  me know
which piece and we'll go from there!

3. The most comments were about the beads on the last page
where I used the embossing powder! Here are a few more tips
and hints on that technique.

If you use a softer clay like the sculpey that has a shorter bake
time,
you can form your beads and then coat them with the embossing
powder before you bake them!

With the Armour All technique on clay that is partially cooked, you

can substitute water for the Armour All. All you really want is for
the
beads to be damp enough for the powder to stick!

Watch out for bubbles when you wet the beads. If your water or
Armour All
has bubbled up, it can keep the bubble when it cooks.

NOTE - Beads done this way come out with a beautiful shine and
don't need to
be coated with anything else to look good! However, I have gone
back and
coated mine with Future for a little added protection. I dried the
Future on the
beads in a warm oven for 2 to 3 minutes. By warm I mean 200 degrees
or so.
Not hot enough to start cooking the clay again, or the powder!

4. Lastly, I think!  There's usually a thread in here off and on
fingerprints! Here's one
thing I've noticed, and this is just my own personal observation -
I think the amount
of fingerprints you get on a piece has alot to do with the clay.
The softer clays
like sculpey seem to show more fingerprints than premo, and premo
seems to
show more fingerprints than fimo!

Has anyone else made that observation?

5. Last thing - one lady who wrote me an e-mail said she had the
polymer, but
not the nerve to get started. When I first started with clay,
(almost 2 years ago)
I tore open the packages, kneaded it up and started mixing it,
roping colors
together, etc. Then I tossed all of the stuff in the oven, waited
for it to bake and
when it came out, I was pleased but disappointed!

I wasn't new to crafting. I've done water color painting, plastic
canvas, cross stitch,
sewing, quilting, fabric painting, ceramics, wood/tole painting,
etc! But I didn't know
anything about this clay! I'd seen a few pictures in some kids
books about easy to make
projects using clay, but other than that, I knew nothing!

So I went back to my high school art teacher's words of wisdom -
think color wheel
and plan, plan, plan!! I got out my sketch pad and colored pencils
and just started
coloring shapes or even lines in different colors to see which
colors looked good
with each other. Then when I saw combinations that I liked
together, I began to think
about specific designs and I went from there.

Lastly, don't be afraid. It's really hard to mess this stuff up and
personally, I don't think there
is such a thing as a mess up! This clay is so versatile, if  you've
chosen good color
combinations, even what might be considered a mess up, can usally
take a new form and
be something wonderful!

As few as two colors can be swirled, stacked, checkerboarded, etc.
for the most amazing
results! The purple swirl necklace that I have on my site, at the
top of page 3 is one of the
first things I made, but no one ever guesses that. And I've had
more than 1 person offer to buy it
right off my neck! That still shocks me when it happens!

The clay will give you ideas too. As you work with it, you'll begin
to see colors, patterns
even shapes emerging. There are many times I've sat down to make a
specific design
or piece of jewelry and I wind up with something totally different
than what I origianlly
had in mind!

I still consider myself very new at this clay thing! I only have
weekends and some nights
during the week to actually site down and play with clay, and even
that time isn't able to
be devoted 100% to just clay! There are still techniques I want to
try and even some I've
tried that I've yet to master! But as long as you make something
that you like, that's what
I think is important, and you can bet, others will like it too!

Well, ya'll - I apologize for such a long post!

Thanks for taking the time to read this far!

Sharon

 
 
 

My website/polyclay stuff is online!

Post by Lexi Schwart » Tue, 18 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Being primarily a *** stamper, I had plenty of embossing powder.   One of
the things that I found was that if the beads were fresh out of the oven,
just dipping them in the powder was enough to coat them.

More than water, I'd recommend embossing ink.  It's especially designed to
dry slowly so that you can emboss easily.  You can normally find clear
embossing (or pigment, is the other term for embossing ink) at any ***
stamping store, and probably even Michaels.

I definitely enjoyed looking at your pages, and had fun playing with the
embossing powder on the beads.

Lexi

Quote:

> Wow!! I am delighted that so many of you
> took the time to look at my pages! Thank
> you all for your kind words.

> I'll answer a few questions now that I got in some of the
> e-mails about my work!

> 1. My cat pins - I cut those out by hand from an original
> that I made. I made the 1st one, and was so pleased with
> the shape that I use it as a template. I do still cut new ones
> from scratch though too!

> 2. Someone said "What! No prices?" - Hm - I'll have to give
> that some thought about serious selling. For now, if you've
> taken an interest in a piece and would like to buy or want to
> know the price, you can send me an e-mail letting  me know
> which piece and we'll go from there!

> 3. The most comments were about the beads on the last page
> where I used the embossing powder! Here are a few more tips
> and hints on that technique.

> If you use a softer clay like the sculpey that has a shorter bake
> time,
> you can form your beads and then coat them with the embossing
> powder before you bake them!

> With the Armour All technique on clay that is partially cooked, you

> can substitute water for the Armour All. All you really want is for
> the
> beads to be damp enough for the powder to stick!

> Watch out for bubbles when you wet the beads. If your water or
> Armour All
> has bubbled up, it can keep the bubble when it cooks.

> NOTE - Beads done this way come out with a beautiful shine and
> don't need to
> be coated with anything else to look good! However, I have gone
> back and
> coated mine with Future for a little added protection. I dried the
> Future on the
> beads in a warm oven for 2 to 3 minutes. By warm I mean 200 degrees
> or so.
> Not hot enough to start cooking the clay again, or the powder!

> 4. Lastly, I think!  There's usually a thread in here off and on
> fingerprints! Here's one
> thing I've noticed, and this is just my own personal observation -
> I think the amount
> of fingerprints you get on a piece has alot to do with the clay.
> The softer clays
> like sculpey seem to show more fingerprints than premo, and premo
> seems to
> show more fingerprints than fimo!

> Has anyone else made that observation?

> 5. Last thing - one lady who wrote me an e-mail said she had the
> polymer, but
> not the nerve to get started. When I first started with clay,
> (almost 2 years ago)
> I tore open the packages, kneaded it up and started mixing it,
> roping colors
> together, etc. Then I tossed all of the stuff in the oven, waited
> for it to bake and
> when it came out, I was pleased but disappointed!

> I wasn't new to crafting. I've done water color painting, plastic
> canvas, cross stitch,
> sewing, quilting, fabric painting, ceramics, wood/tole painting,
> etc! But I didn't know
> anything about this clay! I'd seen a few pictures in some kids
> books about easy to make
> projects using clay, but other than that, I knew nothing!

> So I went back to my high school art teacher's words of wisdom -
> think color wheel
> and plan, plan, plan!! I got out my sketch pad and colored pencils
> and just started
> coloring shapes or even lines in different colors to see which
> colors looked good
> with each other. Then when I saw combinations that I liked
> together, I began to think
> about specific designs and I went from there.

> Lastly, don't be afraid. It's really hard to mess this stuff up and
> personally, I don't think there
> is such a thing as a mess up! This clay is so versatile, if  you've
> chosen good color
> combinations, even what might be considered a mess up, can usally
> take a new form and
> be something wonderful!

> As few as two colors can be swirled, stacked, checkerboarded, etc.
> for the most amazing
> results! The purple swirl necklace that I have on my site, at the
> top of page 3 is one of the
> first things I made, but no one ever guesses that. And I've had
> more than 1 person offer to buy it
> right off my neck! That still shocks me when it happens!

> The clay will give you ideas too. As you work with it, you'll begin
> to see colors, patterns
> even shapes emerging. There are many times I've sat down to make a
> specific design
> or piece of jewelry and I wind up with something totally different
> than what I origianlly
> had in mind!

> I still consider myself very new at this clay thing! I only have
> weekends and some nights
> during the week to actually site down and play with clay, and even
> that time isn't able to
> be devoted 100% to just clay! There are still techniques I want to
> try and even some I've
> tried that I've yet to master! But as long as you make something
> that you like, that's what
> I think is important, and you can bet, others will like it too!

> Well, ya'll - I apologize for such a long post!

> Thanks for taking the time to read this far!

> Sharon


 
 
 

My website/polyclay stuff is online!

Post by Sharon S » Wed, 19 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Hi Lexi,

The embossing ink/gel is a great idea. My cousin mentioned that
to me after she saw my site also. She's been a *** stamper for
years, but that's one of the things I've never tried.

I have tried dipping the hot beads in the powder w/o a liquid
but I couldn't get the powder as heavily coated as I hoped.
The raw clay is easy to coat though, and this might sound gross,
but spit works well to dab on a raw bead  if you have any areas
where the powder doesn't cover as well as you like!

I'm sure there will be lots of people trying this technique now that
the topic has been brought up, and everyone will probably develop
their own way that works best for them, and perhaps new ways
that produce something new!

Sharon
---------------------------------------------------

Quote:

> Being primarily a *** stamper, I had plenty of embossing powder.   One of
> the things that I found was that if the beads were fresh out of the oven,
> just dipping them in the powder was enough to coat them.

> More than water, I'd recommend embossing ink.  It's especially designed to
> dry slowly so that you can emboss easily.  You can normally find clear
> embossing (or pigment, is the other term for embossing ink) at any ***
> stamping store, and probably even Michaels.

> I definitely enjoyed looking at your pages, and had fun playing with the
> embossing powder on the beads.

> Lexi


> > Wow!! I am delighted that so many of you
> > took the time to look at my pages! Thank
> > you all for your kind words.

> > I'll answer a few questions now that I got in some of the
> > e-mails about my work!

> > 1. My cat pins - I cut those out by hand from an original
> > that I made. I made the 1st one, and was so pleased with
> > the shape that I use it as a template. I do still cut new ones
> > from scratch though too!

> > 2. Someone said "What! No prices?" - Hm - I'll have to give
> > that some thought about serious selling. For now, if you've
> > taken an interest in a piece and would like to buy or want to
> > know the price, you can send me an e-mail letting  me know
> > which piece and we'll go from there!

> > 3. The most comments were about the beads on the last page
> > where I used the embossing powder! Here are a few more tips
> > and hints on that technique.

> > If you use a softer clay like the sculpey that has a shorter bake
> > time,
> > you can form your beads and then coat them with the embossing
> > powder before you bake them!

> > With the Armour All technique on clay that is partially cooked, you

> > can substitute water for the Armour All. All you really want is for
> > the
> > beads to be damp enough for the powder to stick!

> > Watch out for bubbles when you wet the beads. If your water or
> > Armour All
> > has bubbled up, it can keep the bubble when it cooks.

> > NOTE - Beads done this way come out with a beautiful shine and
> > don't need to
> > be coated with anything else to look good! However, I have gone
> > back and
> > coated mine with Future for a little added protection. I dried the
> > Future on the
> > beads in a warm oven for 2 to 3 minutes. By warm I mean 200 degrees
> > or so.
> > Not hot enough to start cooking the clay again, or the powder!

> > 4. Lastly, I think!  There's usually a thread in here off and on
> > fingerprints! Here's one
> > thing I've noticed, and this is just my own personal observation -
> > I think the amount
> > of fingerprints you get on a piece has alot to do with the clay.
> > The softer clays
> > like sculpey seem to show more fingerprints than premo, and premo
> > seems to
> > show more fingerprints than fimo!

> > Has anyone else made that observation?

> > 5. Last thing - one lady who wrote me an e-mail said she had the
> > polymer, but
> > not the nerve to get started. When I first started with clay,
> > (almost 2 years ago)
> > I tore open the packages, kneaded it up and started mixing it,
> > roping colors
> > together, etc. Then I tossed all of the stuff in the oven, waited
> > for it to bake and
> > when it came out, I was pleased but disappointed!

> > I wasn't new to crafting. I've done water color painting, plastic
> > canvas, cross stitch,
> > sewing, quilting, fabric painting, ceramics, wood/tole painting,
> > etc! But I didn't know
> > anything about this clay! I'd seen a few pictures in some kids
> > books about easy to make
> > projects using clay, but other than that, I knew nothing!

> > So I went back to my high school art teacher's words of wisdom -
> > think color wheel
> > and plan, plan, plan!! I got out my sketch pad and colored pencils
> > and just started
> > coloring shapes or even lines in different colors to see which
> > colors looked good
> > with each other. Then when I saw combinations that I liked
> > together, I began to think
> > about specific designs and I went from there.

> > Lastly, don't be afraid. It's really hard to mess this stuff up and
> > personally, I don't think there
> > is such a thing as a mess up! This clay is so versatile, if  you've
> > chosen good color
> > combinations, even what might be considered a mess up, can usally
> > take a new form and
> > be something wonderful!

> > As few as two colors can be swirled, stacked, checkerboarded, etc.
> > for the most amazing
> > results! The purple swirl necklace that I have on my site, at the
> > top of page 3 is one of the
> > first things I made, but no one ever guesses that. And I've had
> > more than 1 person offer to buy it
> > right off my neck! That still shocks me when it happens!

> > The clay will give you ideas too. As you work with it, you'll begin
> > to see colors, patterns
> > even shapes emerging. There are many times I've sat down to make a
> > specific design
> > or piece of jewelry and I wind up with something totally different
> > than what I origianlly
> > had in mind!

> > I still consider myself very new at this clay thing! I only have
> > weekends and some nights
> > during the week to actually site down and play with clay, and even
> > that time isn't able to
> > be devoted 100% to just clay! There are still techniques I want to
> > try and even some I've
> > tried that I've yet to master! But as long as you make something
> > that you like, that's what
> > I think is important, and you can bet, others will like it too!

> > Well, ya'll - I apologize for such a long post!

> > Thanks for taking the time to read this far!

> > Sharon


 
 
 

My website/polyclay stuff is online!

Post by irene and scot » Wed, 19 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Sharon, could you post the URL for your site again?  I must have missed it
the first time around, and these posts have me intrigued.....

Thanks,
Irene in western NC
www.good-night-irene.com
     ----------
remove first x from reply address to email me

 
 
 

My website/polyclay stuff is online!

Post by Sharon S » Wed, 19 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Hi Irene!

Here is the url!

http://www.geocities.com/ferryblue/

Take Care,

Sharon

Quote:

> Sharon, could you post the URL for your site again?  I must have missed it
> the first time around, and these posts have me intrigued.....

> Thanks,
> Irene in western NC
> www.good-night-irene.com
>      ----------
> remove first x from reply address to email me

 
 
 

My website/polyclay stuff is online!

Post by irene and scot » Wed, 19 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> http://www.geocities.com/ferryblue/

You clever girl!  I love the embossing powder technique!  I've mixed e.p.
into clay, and I've used it on the surface of a finished piece in small
areas, but I've never tried coating an entire piece with it.  Hmmm, sounds
like something to play with as soon as I get some of this production work
done.  :)

--
Irene in western NC
www.good-night-irene.com
     ----------
remove first x from reply address to email me

 
 
 

My website/polyclay stuff is online!

Post by Sharon S » Wed, 19 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Hi Again Irene & All!

I'm sort of surprised, because I figured everyone had
tried that e.p. technique before!

I actually stumbled onto when I kept reading about the
mica powders. I had no idea what those were, and just
assumed they were the same thing or close to the ***
stamping powders. It didn't take me long to realize they
weren't! So I figured, I've got these powders, let's see
what they can do!

Wait until you see what I've done w/ the embossing powders
and Altoid tins! : ) I'll be posting those pics soon!

And one of these days, I'll get my hands on some of the mica
powders!!

Take Care All!

Sharon

Quote:


> > http://www.FoundCollection.com/

> You clever girl!  I love the embossing powder technique!  I've mixed e.p.
> into clay, and I've used it on the surface of a finished piece in small
> areas, but I've never tried coating an entire piece with it.  Hmmm, sounds
> like something to play with as soon as I get some of this production work
> done.  :)

> --
> Irene in western NC
> www.good-night-irene.com
>      ----------
> remove first x from reply address to email me