finishing a necklace

finishing a necklace

Post by Ellen O. Che » Fri, 15 Nov 1996 04:00:00



I just started making beads with fimo.  Now I am ready to make them
into a necklace.  What do others use to string their beads.  I see from
a video pieces of leather work good for the heavier beads.  I am just
curious what kind of a finished edge you use?  Do you attach it to a
clasp some how?  I want it to look professional instead of just tying
it at the ends.  Any suggestions?  

 
 
 

finishing a necklace

Post by Jeanne A. E. DeVo » Sat, 16 Nov 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

>I just started making beads with fimo.  Now I am ready to make them
>into a necklace.  What do others use to string their beads.  I see from
>a video pieces of leather work good for the heavier beads.  I am just
>curious what kind of a finished edge you use?  Do you attach it to a
>clasp some how?  I want it to look professional instead of just tying
>it at the ends.  Any suggestions?

There are all sorts of ways to do this, depending on the kind of look you want.

One is to buy a finding called a "leather crimp" or "crimp end". This is a
small piece of metal with the ends folded up; you lay the end of the
leather or cord on the middle third, then fold the outer thrds over it with
pliers so the cord is securely held in the metal. There's a little
ring-shaped tab on the end; that's where you attach the clasp.

Another way is to make your own clasp out of wire. Basically, you wrap wire
around the end of the cord eight or ten times, then twist the trailing end
of wire into a hook (on one side) and an eye (on the other. You might also
want to use 527 or a similar cement to make sure the wire doesn't slip off.

One method that looks nice is to tie a small bead into each end of the
cord. Then you just knot the necklace at the back of your neck to wear it.
It looks a little more finished than just tying the plain leather ends, and
is a good alternative for when you don't want the look of a metal clasp.
--
  "Our greatest fear is that the Internet will become a vehicle
   of free distribution of information."
   - Ken Wasch, president of the Software Publishers Association

 
 
 

finishing a necklace

Post by Desiree McCrore » Sat, 16 Nov 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> I just started making beads with fimo.  Now I am ready to make them
> into a necklace.  What do others use to string their beads.  I see from
> a video pieces of leather work good for the heavier beads.  I am just
> curious what kind of a finished edge you use?  Do you attach it to a
> clasp some how?  I want it to look professional instead of just tying
> it at the ends.  Any suggestions?

What you are looking for is all under the category of jewelry making.
There are several books and such on constructing and finishing, but when
I looked, I didn't find the info to be well documented.

Stringing options. Tiger's tail is plastic coated wire; very strong, has
a bit of a mind of it's own, but doesn't stretch, requires special
closure tools and pieces. Leather is nice, but it does stretch. Waxed
linen is nice, etc. Twine has a earthy natural appearance. There's a few
more. All the stringing options have their advantages and dis', so it
helps to acquire an article or book which will quicken your learning
which options match your tastes and designs.

It's great if you can find a good local bead shop and sign up for a few
classes. Also, the better bead shops are usually more that willing give
a little one-on-one instruction to help get a newbie started. It's
really in their best interest. You might come back a buy more stuff!

Finishing, IMHO, is half, if not more, of what it takes to make a great
piece of artwork. It's really important and knowing how to finish is the
mark of a true artist. Ultimately, one should be able to take a handful
of ordinary or even blah beads and create a great piece.

When watching Tory Hughs do simple jewelry piece demos, what really got
me is seeing her make casual a jab here, a little squiggle there, twist
something, stick a little piece of wire somewhere and end up with
something really marvelous when she finished.

I'd recommend that you search hard for whatever information, knowledge,
experience that you can get your hands on, if your goal is to create
professional looking pieces of artwork. Be forewarned, it won't be easy
nor quick, but it will be worthwhile.

Good luck and skill,

Desiree

 
 
 

finishing a necklace

Post by caneb.. » Sun, 17 Nov 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
Chell) writes:
> pieces of leather work good for the heavier beads.  I am just
>curious what kind of a finished edge you use?  Do you attach it to a
>clasp some how?

There is a jewelry finding called a "leather end" or "leather crimp" you
can get pretty much anywhere findings are sold.  There are two types: one
is spring-shaped and can be crimped onto the end of the cord, one is flat
with flanges that fold over the cord.  Either one works better if you add
a drop of super glue after crimping.  Both have eye loops that can be
attached to clasps.

Juli

 
 
 

finishing a necklace

Post by ulr.. » Sun, 17 Nov 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
Chell) writes:
>I just started making beads with fimo.  Now I am ready to make them
>into a necklace.  What do others use to string their beads.  I see from
>a video pieces of leather work good for the heavier beads.  I am just
>curious what kind of a finished edge you use?  Do you attach it to a
>clasp some how?  I want it to look professional instead of just tying
>it at the ends.  Any suggestions?  

This is a hard question to answer because it's so big.  There
are so many answers.  There are a great many possible
materials and techniques and closure options to choose
from.   The business of stringing beads into jewelry is a whole
'nother hobby, and one which is seeig quite a lot of popularity,
lately, at least if you judge by the number of books on the subject.  
One very good resource in the current batch is _Beads!_ by Stefany
Tomalin.

If you string on bead cord (silk, or synthetic), you can finish the
ends with bead tips, which cover the knot and give a professional
looking finish, and can then be attached to your clasp.  If
you bead on tigertail or nylon line, you can close by looping
your ends through the eye of the closure/clasp, then back
through a crimp bead and the last few of your regular beads,
and crimping.

 Lots of folks also seem to be going with a
bar clasp closure, these days (this works much like the
toggle closures you see on some peacoats), in which case
you can make the bar (toggle) out of polymer clay to match
your beads, and make the loop by turning back the beaded
(unfinished) end of your necklace to form a loop at the
end, and then slipping the end of your thread into a
(pre-placed -- this takes planning) crimp bead and slipping
the rest through the beads behind the crimp bead, and
then crimping.  

I'm sorry, this description probably isn't very helpful -- it's
much easier to show than to describe.  It might be more
helpful if you were to seek out a good book on the subject,
or take a necklace class at your local bead store or
through the local bead society, if there is one.

Ulrika O'Brien, Philosopher Without Portfolio