Using Plastic Items as Support Molds in an Oven

Using Plastic Items as Support Molds in an Oven

Post by Holly Sto » Mon, 29 Jan 1996 04:00:00



Hi all,

Please be very carefull what types of plastics you use as bases to
support your work.

I ahve seen recent posts regarding film canisters and L'eggs eggs.  

Many plastics are made with syanide.  When heated the syanide is
released into the air.

Make sure that you do this in a well ventilated area and that you
wide the inside of the oven with a damp cloth when you are done.  Do
not use these in self cleaning ovens.  The gas will deposit a residue
in the the surface of the oven walls.  When you self clean the
syanide sill be released into the air in your kitchen

I can not say this strongly enough Please be careful.

Holly

 
 
 

Using Plastic Items as Support Molds in an Oven

Post by Diana Cri » Mon, 29 Jan 1996 04:00:00


I have had so many requests for info on HIA, chat with Helmut and why it
was the most incredible 4 days of my life that I feel I want to do this
properly so writing a story will be the answer. But I felt after reading
this post that now would be the best time for one of Helmuts answers.

Polymer Clay can release dangerous fumes when heated to over 300 degrees.
If the clay is cooked in the home oven and a residue remains self cleaning
the oven will have to be done on a regular basis. But in this process the
oven reaches temperatures of 500 degrees. Helmut confirmed the release of
harmful fumes so he suggested strongly THAT YOU TAKE THE DOG FOR A
WALK and leave a window open. In other words remove yourself from the room
and also leave the exhaust fan on.

I purchased a convection oven and ONLY use it for Polymer Clay work. They are
well worth the investment so put your family on a Kraft Dinner diet and
splurge.
You will also find your work will be much stronger due to the constant heat
temperature. After one of Dottie's many SUPER suggestions I too bake and
rebake with excellent results.

Diana
at a slightly lower temperature

Quote:


>Subject: Using Plastic Items as Support Molds in an Oven
>Date: 28 Jan 96 21:01:16 -0800
>Hi all,
>Please be very carefull what types of plastics you use as bases to
>support your work.
>I ahve seen recent posts regarding film canisters and L'eggs eggs.  
>Many plastics are made with syanide.  When heated the syanide is
>released into the air.
>Make sure that you do this in a well ventilated area and that you
>wide the inside of the oven with a damp cloth when you are done.  Do
>not use these in self cleaning ovens.  The gas will deposit a residue
>in the the surface of the oven walls.  When you self clean the
>syanide sill be released into the air in your kitchen
>I can not say this strongly enough Please be careful.
>Holly

-------------------------------------------------------------------
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"Cutting and Measuring Template for Polymer Clays"              
http://mindlink.net/diana_crick/template.htm - Online Order Form
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Using Plastic Items as Support Molds in an Oven

Post by David Edward » Tue, 30 Jan 1996 04:00:00


The specific harmful stuff released by polymer clay when it burns is
hydrochloric acid.  This is not a deadly toxin like cyanide; indeed, our
stomachs normally contain HCl.  But it is bad in the eyes, lungs, etc.  
It is by no means an insidious material; it is very irritating, and one's
natural response to HCl in the air is the correct one: go away until the
air is clean.  Minor pyrolysis products should be those of the burning
oil (used in manufacture to get rid of the monamer) and the plasticizer
(dioctyl phthalate); in terms of immediate toxicity, the effect of the
HCl would be by far the most important.  So: if a piece of polymer clay
starts to burn, turn off the oven, open windows, and go away for a while.

David Edwards

--
____________________________________________________________
***  All is comfortable here at the end of the universe,
     surfing the Bretz floods and watching for buffalo. ***
            It won't take long; you come too.
____________________________________________________________

 
 
 

Using Plastic Items as Support Molds in an Oven

Post by Sherry Bail » Wed, 31 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Cyanide comes from burning styrofoam, sometimes still used by people
(unfortunately at the advice in Susanna Oroyan's otherwise excellent
dollmaking book, Fantastic Figures) for the bases of doll heads.  If you don't
allow styrofoam to get hot enough to actually burn, then it may still melt --
as far as I know the fumes at that stage are not cyanide laden although I'm
sure they still small bad!

Always better, from a safety standpoint, to not mix too many plastics in a hot
place, particularly if there is a chance of touching a heating element or any
other factor that might lead to burning. Burning nearly any plastic releases
fumes you don't want to breathe.

Sherry

 
 
 

Using Plastic Items as Support Molds in an Oven

Post by Holly Sto » Thu, 01 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Hi folks,

Just to clear up any misunderstnding regarding my post (shown Below)

I was referring to the plastic molds that people are talking about
using to support ther work while they are baking, I was not referring
to poly clays.

In the late 60's or maybe sometime in the 70's, I can't remember,
plastics that contain cyanide were removed from, plains, trains, etc.
because it was found that the cyanide gas given off do to fires
related to crashes caused more deaths and medical problems than the
fires or accidents.  

---------------------
Please be very carefull what types of plastics you use as bases to
support your work.

I have seen recent posts regarding film canisters and L'eggs eggs.  

Many plastics are made with cyanide.  When heated the syanide is
released into the air.

Make sure that you do this in a well ventilated area and that you
wide the inside of the oven with a damp cloth when you are done.  Do
not use these in self cleaning ovens.  The gas will deposit a residue
in the the surface of the oven walls.  When you self clean the
cyanide will be released into the air in your kitchen

----------------------

Holly

 
 
 

Using Plastic Items as Support Molds in an Oven

Post by Dorothy Mcmill » Sat, 03 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Hi Diana;  Good post!  And an important one.

        Isn't the convection oven the best!  I love mine.  It's outside
where the fumes can't get into the house.  However, for people who live
in very cold states or don't have an outside or garage area to use, the
oven can be put in a room where you won't be while your stuff is baking.  
Open a window slightly at least to let the fumes flow out and not collect
in the room.  When you get into doing poly clay a lot, then you MUST
think of safety first.

 
 
 

Using Plastic Items as Support Molds in an Oven

Post by sch.. » Mon, 05 Feb 1996 04:00:00


I just bought a good-sized Farberware "convection turbo-oven" for $40
from my next-door neighbor who is moving away.  Maybe it is the "push" I
need to get back into polyclay.  At least I'll have to try it out!  (And
my DH will have a fit if it just sits there with all my other "clay
junk"!)

                         -- Susan                  

Quote:

>Hi Diana;  Good post!  And an important one.
>        Isn't the convection oven the best!  I love mine.  It's outside
>where the fumes can't get into the house.  However, for people who live
>in very cold states or don't have an outside or garage area to use, the
>oven can be put in a room where you won't be while your stuff is baking.  
>Open a window slightly at least to let the fumes flow out and not collect
>in the room.  When you get into doing poly clay a lot, then you MUST
>think of safety first.