favorite clay tools

favorite clay tools

Post by Patti Kiml » Thu, 15 Jan 1998 04:00:00



Quote:

> She must have been in mine too.  I don't think I'm a tool junkie, I
> know
> it.

> Most of my tools from other crafts have ended up in my clay tool
> boxes.
> I haven't figured out how to use my tjinting tools yet, but there's
> always hope.  :0)

Use them for drizzling Liquid Sculpey.  Wasn't somebody talking about
how to pipe it?

just a thought...
Patti

 
 
 

favorite clay tools

Post by Stephanie Michlin » Thu, 15 Jan 1998 04:00:00


My favorite tools are ones I have made from polymer clay.  I would try
to describe them, but would end up with another really gross thread
going.

Stephanie Michlink/Garlands & Roses--Seattle

Quote:

> I just want you to know that I love all my tools equally!  I have no
> favorites!
>  There, now no one will get jealous and stop working!<VBG>

> XO
> Pip


 
 
 

favorite clay tools

Post by Eepipki » Fri, 16 Jan 1998 04:00:00


I just want you to know that I love all my tools equally!  I have no favorites!
 There, now no one will get jealous and stop working!<VBG>

XO
Pip

 
 
 

favorite clay tools

Post by Kathy & Wi » Fri, 16 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:


> > She must have been in mine too.  I don't think I'm a tool junkie, I
> > know
> > it.

> > Most of my tools from other crafts have ended up in my clay tool
> > boxes.
> > I haven't figured out how to use my tjinting tools yet, but there's
> > always hope.  :0)

> Use them for drizzling Liquid Sculpey.  Wasn't somebody talking about
> how to pipe it?

> just a thought...
> Patti

Patti,

Excellent thought.  Actually I thought I could use those little
syringe-like thingeys I once bought that were made to apply acrylic paint
in little decorative strings to things like Christmas balls.

I hate to clean house, but it's kind of fun to clean out the old craft
boxes and shelves.  You never know what you will come across, and I have
ever been one of those people who buys things because "I might need it in
20 years and it might not be available then".

Kathy

 
 
 

favorite clay tools

Post by Stephanie Michlin » Fri, 16 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Kathy,

Why is i the men can save every nut, bolt and wire and have the nerve to
say something about the amount of our craft inventory?  I have craft
stuff archived from 20 years, but hey I may need it some day.

Stephanie Michlink

Quote:



> > > She must have been in mine too.  I don't think I'm a tool junkie,
> I
> > > know
> > > it.

> > > Most of my tools from other crafts have ended up in my clay tool
> > > boxes.
> > > I haven't figured out how to use my tjinting tools yet, but
> there's
> > > always hope.  :0)

> > Use them for drizzling Liquid Sculpey.  Wasn't somebody talking
> about
> > how to pipe it?

> > just a thought...
> > Patti

> Patti,

> Excellent thought.  Actually I thought I could use those little
> syringe-like thingeys I once bought that were made to apply acrylic
> paint
> in little decorative strings to things like Christmas balls.

> I hate to clean house, but it's kind of fun to clean out the old craft

> boxes and shelves.  You never know what you will come across, and I
> have
> ever been one of those people who buys things because "I might need it
> in
> 20 years and it might not be available then".

> Kathy

 
 
 

favorite clay tools

Post by Leland Green.. » Fri, 16 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>> She must have been in mine too.  I don't think I'm a tool junkie, I
>> know
>> it.

>> Most of my tools from other crafts have ended up in my clay tool
>> boxes.
>> I haven't figured out how to use my tjinting tools yet, but there's
>> always hope.  :0)

>Use them for drizzling Liquid Sculpey.  Wasn't somebody talking about
>how to pipe it?

>just a thought...
>Patti

Yo, Patti & Whoever!

    Woh... wait a sec... I'm a newbie to polyclay AND newsgroups, so go easy
on me, here...

    "tjinting"?   "drizzling"?  (I can almost guess that one, maybe?;)
"pipe it"???

    Explain these and I'll gladly explain any programmer's talk that comes
up in here!!!  :)

    (Or maybe I'm asking about typos???)

    Oh, just so I'm on topic (yeah, been around the net forever) my favorite
tools are still my pingers...  (er, uh.... that's slang fer fingers. :) and
some wire tools I've made.

    TIA,
     Leland Green...
     Artist and Programmer at large
     http://www.FoundCollection.com/***pun/top.htm
     (Figure out the email address modification if you want to email me;)

 
 
 

favorite clay tools

Post by Kathy & Wi » Sat, 17 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> >> She must have been in mine too.  I don't think I'm a tool junkie, I
> >> know
> >> it.

> >> Most of my tools from other crafts have ended up in my clay tool
> >> boxes.
> >> I haven't figured out how to use my tjinting tools yet, but there's
> >> always hope.  :0)

> >Use them for drizzling Liquid Sculpey.  Wasn't somebody talking about
> >how to pipe it?

> >just a thought...
> >Patti

> Yo, Patti & Whoever!

>     Woh... wait a sec... I'm a newbie to polyclay AND newsgroups, so go easy
> on me, here...

>     "tjinting"?   "drizzling"?  (I can almost guess that one, maybe?;)
> "pipe it"???

>     Explain these and I'll gladly explain any programmer's talk that comes
> up in here!!!  :)

>     (Or maybe I'm asking about typos???)

>     Oh, just so I'm on topic (yeah, been around the net forever) my favorite
> tools are still my pingers...  (er, uh.... that's slang fer fingers. :) and
> some wire tools I've made.

>     TIA,
>      Leland Green...
>      Artist and Programmer at large
>      http://www.FoundCollection.com/***pun/top.htm
>      (Figure out the email address modification if you want to email me;)

Leland,

A tjinting tool is a little funnel on a stick that is used to apply
melted wax on an egg for the old Ukranian folk art called Psanky.  It is
a method of wax resist.  You start out with a white egg and apply wax on
the places you want to remain white.  Then you dye the egg yellow.  Then
apply wax to the areas you want to remain yellow.  You then do orange,
red, green, blue, brown and black depending on the colors you want.  What
you end up with is an egg that looks awful--it's completely covered with
black.  Then you put it in a candle flame and start wiping and voila!  
Under all that yucky black wax are the beautiful colors you protected
with the wax.  It's really amazing.

Kathy

 
 
 

favorite clay tools

Post by Leland Green.. » Sat, 17 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Kathy,

    Thank you.  I remembered the process of tjintling from an old National
Geographic...  (It seems like I looked at those eggs for hours.)  I just
didn't remember the name.

    I'm still guessing at 'drizzling' and 'piping', though.

    Thanks again,
    Leland...

Quote:

>Leland,

>A tjinting tool is a little funnel on a stick that is used to apply
>melted wax on an egg for the old Ukranian folk art called Psanky.  It is
>a method of wax resist.  You start out with a white egg and apply wax on
>the places you want to remain white.  Then you dye the egg yellow.  Then
>apply wax to the areas you want to remain yellow.  You then do orange,
>red, green, blue, brown and black depending on the colors you want.  What
>you end up with is an egg that looks awful--it's completely covered with
>black.  Then you put it in a candle flame and start wiping and voila!
>Under all that yucky black wax are the beautiful colors you protected
>with the wax.  It's really amazing.

>Kathy

 
 
 

favorite clay tools

Post by Dormax10 » Sat, 17 Jan 1998 04:00:00


I'm a newbie to the art, too.  And, I'm still trying to figure out what all of
this stuff is, let alone what all the tools I've seen are for.  Could anyone be
kind enough to let me in on what (and how) to use some of the more common
tools....  PLEASE!!!

Richard

 
 
 

favorite clay tools

Post by Sherry Bail » Sat, 17 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Not to quibble, but I thought the word was tjAnting? Is yes? Is no? ;^)

I got one aeons ago that is like a littls sphere (brass I believe) with a
small tube soldered to it to form the "needle" art -- quite the reservoir for
wax! (Never used it!) Pysanky eggs are gorgeous, but I probably own't ever
have enough patience to actually make one!

Sherry

 
 
 

favorite clay tools

Post by Sherry Bail » Sat, 17 Jan 1998 04:00:00


: I'm a newbie to the art, too.  And, I'm still trying to figure out what all of
: this stuff is, let alone what all the tools I've seen are for.  Could anyone be
: kind enough to let me in on what (and how) to use some of the more common
: tools....  PLEASE!!!

: Richard

Well, it's kind of hard to say -- not only are there very few "common" tools,
everybody works differently. If you sculpt three dimensionally you might use a
needle tool (for example) for incising lines on an animal's fur. If you make
beads, you might use it to make the holes before stringing the beads onto a
wire for baking. If you do canework, you might use it to help pack in tight
areas of background around a design. Or you could come up with a dozen other
uses -- it's not like there are right and wrong ways or even definitive ones
for using ANYTHING.

If you are a rank beginner, I guess I'd say the following are basic, but
again, it all depends on what you do. (Some people are happy with only their
hands and one or two other things.)

oven (the stuff is worthless unless baked! Preferably, in my opinion, a
dedicated convection or toaster oven.)

blade for cutting cleanly (tissue blade, nublade, wallpaper blade, single
edged razor blade, sharp kitchen knife.) (essential for cane work)

needle tool (point on a handle -- see above, or think of other uses)

work surface (most people like something clean, hard, and either portable for
workshops, or large for a studio -- glass, plexiglass, self-healing cutting
mats, etc. are all popular -- some people add sheets of paper, bond or baking
parchment in particular, so they can bake on the same thing. Others like 6 or
8 inch ceramic tiles, similar reasons.)

I guess those are about the most minimum requirements. (Anybody see anything
missing -- as a tool collector I passed by "minimum" AGES ago!!)

Beyond that, here are the important additions for "serious" polymer people, at
least from my viewpoint. (You do know this stuff is covered in the excellent
books out there, don't you? Kind of redundant to rehash it. But here goes
anyhow.)

Atlas (all metal, hand cranked) pasta machine (you can get a motor if you want
to.) (for making uniform sheets of clay, mixing and conditioning clay, and
making Skinner blends -- one color gradually fading into another.)

Small food processor (Black & Decker is often praised) (for chopping up clay,
especially the hard kinds like Fimo, prior to hand conditioning. Also makes
nuggets for faux turquoise or similar looks.)

pottery tools (used as you do in pottery work)

sculpting tools

nearly any tool with a point or interesting shape

things to make textures in the clay (tools, junk, fabrics, paper, jewelry,
reflectors, screening, this is endless)

drill bits in polymer clay handles (bake in place, then pop out and glue)
(drilling polymer doesn't require power, it's soft enough you can just twist a
drill bit through by hand.)

darning needles, and beading needles in polymer clay handles (same process)
(Katherine Dewey invented a tool with only the tips of three equally spaced
beading needles, really thin, sticking out of a polymer clay handle -- it is
wonderful to make the look of fur on an animal sculpture)

leather embossing tools

Anything that makes interesting marks on clay, helps smooth clay, or otherwise
accomplish what you want to accomplish is good.

Then there are decorations (like metallic powders, glitter, paint, makeup,
etc.) and findings for jewelry (like pin backs, ear wires, pendant bails,
etc.) and add-ins (like embedded beads, metal, stones, etc.)

I quit -- it's endless!!! Keep reading, this is the place to find out about
this stuff!

Sherry

 
 
 

favorite clay tools

Post by iren » Sat, 17 Jan 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
> Not to quibble, but I thought the word was tjAnting? Is yes? Is no? ;^)

I think it's tjanting, too -- pronounced JOHN-ting, is the way I've heard
it.  I know it as a batik tool -- batik being wax resist and dyeing on
fabric.  The ones I'm familiar with have a wooden handle and a brass bowl
at the working end, with a tiny cylindrical tip for wax to flow out.  You
dip the bowl end of the tjanting into your pot of melted wax and then draw
with it onto your fabric until the wax in the bowl either runs out or cools
enough that it clogs the tip.  I suppose it's used similarly for eggs.
Fascinating stuff, to try in another lifetime, perhaps.

Irene

 
 
 

favorite clay tools

Post by DABla » Sat, 17 Jan 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
> my favorite tools are still my pingers...  (er, uh.... that's slang fer
>fingers. :) . . . . and some wire tools I've made.

The wire tools sound interesting!. . .  (tools *for* wire? or *of* wire?)
Could you describe a few?

Diane B.

 
 
 

favorite clay tools

Post by d.. » Sat, 17 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Sherry, if you're not planning on using it, how about*** the
tjanting tool?  It's the type with a wooden handle, right?  Ohhh, how
about covering the wooden handle of other tools - a hammer for my dad on
Father's Day - not exactly practical but kinda cool.  And if you like
the look of Pysanky how about canes in the traditional colors and
patterns covering eggs?  And matching egg cups?  With coordinating
candlesticks and napkin rings?  Or a brooch in an egg shape and tiny
matching drop earrings?

Oh great.  Another night when I can't fall asleep thinking of all the
possibilities!

Diane
(on the Connecticut coast)

Quote:

> I got one aeons ago that is like a littls sphere (brass I believe) with a
> small tube soldered to it to form the "needle" art -- quite the reservoir for
> wax! (Never used it!) Pysanky eggs are gorgeous, but I probably own't ever
> have enough patience to actually make one!

> Sherry

 
 
 

favorite clay tools

Post by MJBU » Sat, 17 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Also ,   *** stamps are good for a beginner........    to make impressions.
 Like for frames or jewelry.
Sort of a instant project.    Roll out the clay,  press a *** stamp into
clay and bake ( if it sticks,  take a brush and brush baby powder over stamp,
acts as release agent.
If some powder stays on clay just use soft brush and brush off)  what about
corn starch?  anyone else use that before?
*********

Quote:
>oven (the stuff is worthless unless baked! Preferably, in my opinion, a
>dedicated convection or toaster oven.)

>blade for cutting cleanly (tissue blade, nublade, wallpaper blade, single
>edged razor blade, sharp kitchen knife.) (essential for cane work)

>needle tool (point on a handle -- see above, or think of other uses)

>work surface (most people like something clean, hard, and either portable for
>workshops, or large for a studio -- glass, plexiglass, self-healing cutting
>mats, etc. are all popular -- some people add sheets of paper, bond or baking
>parchment in particular, so they can bake on the same thing. Others like 6 or
>8 inch ceramic tiles, similar reasons.)

>I guess those are about the most minimum requirements. (Anybody see anything
>missing -- as a tool collector I passed by "minimum" AGES ago!!)

>Beyond that, here are the important additions for "serious" polymer people,
>at
>least from my viewpoint. (You do know this stuff is covered in the excellent
>books out there, don't you? Kind of redundant to rehash it. But here goes
>anyhow.)

>Atlas (all metal, hand cranked) pasta machine (you can get a motor if you
>want
>to.) (for making uniform sheets of clay, mixing and conditioning clay, and
>making Skinner blends -- one color gradually fading into another.)

>Small food processor (Black & Decker is often praised) (for chopping up clay,
>especially the hard kinds like Fimo, prior to hand conditioning. Also makes
>nuggets for faux turquoise or similar looks.)

>pottery tools (used as you do in pottery work)

>sculpting tools

>nearly any tool with a point or interesting shape

>things to make textures in the clay (tools, junk, fabrics, paper, jewelry,
>reflectors, screening, this is endless)

>drill bits in polymer clay handles (bake in place, then pop out and glue)
>(drilling polymer doesn't require power, it's soft enough you can just twist
>a
>drill bit through by hand.)

>darning needles, and beading needles in polymer clay handles (same process)
>(Katherine Dewey invented a tool with only the tips of three equally spaced
>beading needles, really thin, sticking out of a polymer clay handle -- it is
>wonderful to make the look of fur on an animal sculpture)

>leather embossing tools

>Anything that makes interesting marks on clay, helps smooth clay, or
>otherwise
>accomplish what you want to accomplish is good.

>Then there are decorations (like metallic powders, glitter, paint, makeup,
>etc.) and findings for jewelry (like pin backs, ear wires, pendant bails,
>etc.) and add-ins (like embedded beads, metal, stones, etc.)

>I quit -- it's endless!!! Keep reading, this is the place to find out about
>this stuff!

Mj   aka;  Nuts4clay
Billings Montana
  ~Be Happy~