Weird FIMO baking result

Weird FIMO baking result

Post by Dorothy Mcmill » Tue, 02 May 1995 04:00:00



Hi Jeff;  Several things could have happened.  One is that when getting
it conditioned and flattened to that thickness, tiny bubbles of air could
have been mixed in.  The airy spaces would be more transluscent while the
others would be whiter.  However, It's more likely that the clay wasn't  
conditioned enough.  So many people think that Sculpey doesn't need the
same conditioning as Fimo, since it's so soft to begin with.  However, in
order to be stable and evenly colored, you should, either by hand or with
a pasta maker, fold and flatten it at least 14 times.  (be sure to put
the folded end first through the pasta maker to avoid air bubbles)  It's
also possible that you got some old clay that had been sitting in a warm
place for a long time.  Parts of it might have slowly cured over that
time while others, with more plasticizers or resin, didn't.  That could
make a difference.    Hope this helps.

-

 
 
 

Weird FIMO baking result

Post by Jeff Garber » Tue, 02 May 1995 04:00:00


I baked a little item made from a couple of pieces of 1/16" thick white FIMO
last night, and it came out oddly. Instead of being consistently white, it
was translucent, with little mottled pockets of denser white. Kind of a neat
effect, but not what I was looking for.  Anybody seen this before? Did I not
cook it long enough?



 
 
 

Weird FIMO baking result

Post by Desiree McCror » Tue, 02 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

> I baked a little item made from a couple of pieces of 1/16" thick white FIMO
> last night, and it came out oddly. Instead of being consistently white, it
> was translucent, with little mottled pockets of denser white. Kind of a neat
> effect, but not what I was looking for.  Anybody seen this before? Did I not
> cook it long enough?

Are you absolutely sure it was "White" and not the "Opaque/Transparent"?
White Fimo baked comes out just that - white. But the "Opaque/Transparent"
gets milky (translucent) after baking.

It's very easy for people to get the two confused.In the pre-baked state,
both look pretty much the same. Make sure you read the labels on the
packages very closely.

--
Desiree

 
 
 

Weird FIMO baking result

Post by WINTER PAUL RUDOL » Wed, 03 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
>same conditioning as Fimo, since it's so soft to begin with.  However, in
>order to be stable and evenly colored, you should, either by hand or with
>a pasta maker, fold and flatten it at least 14 times.  (be sure to put
>the folded end first through the pasta maker to avoid air bubbles)  It's

Is that anything like the seven shuffles needed to thouroughly mix a deck
of cards?   :)

(Just reading over my wife's shoulder and couldn't resist)
Paul

 
 
 

Weird FIMO baking result

Post by Tim Post » Sat, 06 May 1995 04:00:00



: >same conditioning as Fimo, since it's so soft to begin with.  However, in
: >order to be stable and evenly colored, you should, either by hand or with
: >a pasta maker, fold and flatten it at least 14 times.  (be sure to put
: >the folded end first through the pasta maker to avoid air bubbles)  It's

: Is that anything like the seven shuffles needed to thoroughly mix a deck
: of cards?   :)

Not quite; a shuffle does more mixing in one step than a fold
(in a technical measure of mixing that is used in chaos theory;
One operation in chaos theory is called the filo mapping,
by close anlogy with preparing filo dough).

That's why seven shuffles can pretty thoroughly pseudo-randomize a card
deck, while you need more (note the 14 suggested above) for folding.

But the answer to "anything like?" is yes:
very similar mathematics.

Tim
--
Tim Poston      Institute of Systems Science, National University of Singapore
Give a man a fish: feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish: feed him for life.
           Teach a hundred men to fish: empty the lake of fish.

 
 
 

Weird FIMO baking result

Post by KELLIEC.. » Tue, 09 May 1995 04:00:00


I posting this for margaret who couldn't get thru.

        Greetings!  I am new to this net, having just finished university
exams and not allowed myself to play until I was done studying etc.  I am
thrilled to find this group, and would like to take this opportunity to
introduce myself and ask a few questions pertaining to polymer clays and
sculpting and creating and playing.
        As I said, I'm in university.  In my spare time I make
miniatures, 8" child dolls, and 3-8" baby dragon figurines.  (I also do
other stuff, but this is the only part of my life that pertains to this
corner of the Internet, so I won't bore you with the details!)
        Quite a few people, including unbiased strangers, have said that
my dragon figurines are quite good and that I should consider selling
them.  Though I don't imagine such a concept putting me through the rest
of university, the economy being what it is, I thought I'd give it a try
for the extra cash it might bring in.  However, this raises several
difficulties.
        When I make the dragons, they have wings and spikes and ears and
accessories.  They are extremely fragile.  I will try the technique of
longer baking time, (previously I did the slow warm-up and slow
cool-down, but only cooked for about 20 minutes) and see if that makes
any difference.  I'm presently working with Super Sculpey (peach flesh
colored, since that's all that's available in larger sizes in my area).
I tried Fimo, and like the durability, but find Sculpey easier to work
with due to its increased ?malleability?. (Spelling is not my forte.)
I've tried Cernit, but only a little.  With that background in mind, my
questions are as follows:
        1) which of the polymer clays is the most durable for the type of
sculpture I am interested in?  I was told that porcelain is the best, but
I can't afford a kiln, so turned to the polymer clays.  Other than
extended baking, is there any other way I can make my sculptures more
durable?  Would mixing compounds help or hinder?
        2) what is 'Promat', and how does it compare with Fimo, Sculpey,
and Cernit.
        3) what is 'PaperClay', and how does it compare with F, S, C, and P.
        4) since I have to sell my creations, which is hard 'cause
they're so cute and by the time they're baked I'm in love with them, does
anyone know of a stronger medium (ie. finishes more plastic-y, or is
stronger) that I could possibly pour into a mold made from a dragon, so
that I get to keep the original?  Or if anyone has other suggestions
along those lines....!
        5) I've read in doll magazines about dolls made from 'resin', and
they are magazines that do specify 'cernit' or 'sculpey' etc, so I was
led to believe that 'resin' was a separate type of clay.  But in one
thread I read that all clays have resin in them.  Which is it?  If resin
is a separate type of clay, again, how does it compare with the others in
terms of workability and durability?
        That's all my questions for now, though I'd love advice from
people who sell figurines etc. on getting started, and how to know if you
really are good enough, and how to set prices, etc.  I thank you all in
advance for taking the time to read this looooong letter, apologize for
my verbose-ness, and will appreciate any responses I get, either in the
Internet or through e-mail.  Thanks again!
                                        Margaret