clay baking question

clay baking question

Post by just juli » Wed, 02 Jun 1999 04:00:00



So, I've recently gotten interested in customizing barbies, and turning
them into the action figures of my dreams.  Poly clay seems like the
perfect material to make them little weapons, jewelry, masks, etc.  My
question is, for things that are supposed to be molded to the body, how
should I bake them? Ideally, I would bake the doll and clay so the shape
wouldn't collapse, but I suspect the doll would melt.  Any ideas on how to
keep the shape intact, without melting dolls?

j
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    essays and bra obsession   http://www.medianstrip.net/~julia
      "Nobody's interested in sweetness and light."   --Hedda Hopper

 
 
 

clay baking question

Post by Quixot » Wed, 02 Jun 1999 04:00:00



Quote:
> wouldn't collapse, but I suspect the doll would melt.  Any ideas on how to
> keep the shape intact, without melting dolls?

You might consider making some molds with plaster of paris.  You could make
a half molding at a time, front and then back.  Might want to use an old
barbie in case you have to use a little persuasion to remove it from the
mold.  If you needed to you could then use the molds to make a clay replica
of the doll part to use as a form for your baking.  I did something similar
to this to make miniature disc.  It may be a little more complicated with a
doll shape but I could see it working.

 
 
 

clay baking question

Post by Stephanie Gang » Wed, 02 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>So, I've recently gotten interested in customizing barbies, and turning
>them into the action figures of my dreams.  Poly clay seems like the
>perfect material to make them little weapons, jewelry, masks, etc.  My
>question is, for things that are supposed to be molded to the body, how
>should I bake them? Ideally, I would bake the doll and clay so the shape
>wouldn't collapse, but I suspect the doll would melt.  Any ideas on how to
>keep the shape intact, without melting dolls?

I have also heard the idea of covering the parts of the doll you want to
custom fit with foil then carefully lifting the finished piece off the
doll for baking. You are right the doll melts into a big puddle during
baking. I like the idea of making a mold for a certain part of the doll
you are more likely to make molded parts for and using that for the
baking process. Good luck.

--

With God all things are possible

 
 
 

clay baking question

Post by BethCurra » Thu, 03 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Try searching Deja News using keywords "Battle Clad Barbie" for a fun thread
from a year or so ago.  I can't remember how Barbie turned out, though -
does anybody remember?

Quote:

>So, I've recently gotten interested in customizing barbies, and turning
>them into the action figures of my dreams.  Poly clay seems like the
>perfect material to make them little weapons, jewelry, masks, etc.  My
>question is, for things that are supposed to be molded to the body, how
>should I bake them? Ideally, I would bake the doll and clay so the shape
>wouldn't collapse, but I suspect the doll would melt.  Any ideas on how to
>keep the shape intact, without melting dolls?

>j
>---------------------------------------------------------------------------
---

>    essays and bra obsession   http://www.medianstrip.net/~julia
>      "Nobody's interested in sweetness and light."   --Hedda Hopper

 
 
 

clay baking question

Post by Annette Ha » Wed, 09 Jun 1999 04:00:00


The past posts regarding Barbie were authored by tjturner. If you've
located them you know that Barbie blew-up. There is a young man who is
a member of Polymer Clay Central who has just recently posted a new web
site that shows, among other things, a Battle Clad Barbie. I don't know
if this is the same person or not. Check out-
 http://members.xoom.com/Spooky T/
 Annette

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

 
 
 

clay baking question

Post by Annette Ha » Wed, 09 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
> if this is the same person or not. Check out-
>  http://members.xoom.com/Spooky T/
>  Annette

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

I do not know why the complete URL didn't show up highlighted. I
checked on PCC and the above is exactly as it is posted there. I will
type it again and see if it works this time. If it doesn't show up
right, anyone knowing what to do about it, please help.
http://members.xoom.com/Spooky T
(I'll try it without the last /)
 Annette

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

 
 
 

clay baking question

Post by Judi Maddiga » Wed, 09 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Hi, Annette

You just need an underscore character rather than a space ahead of the
letter T. http://members.xoom.com/Spooky_T/ should work.

Judi Maddigan
http://www.angelslanding.com/pushmolds/index.html

Quote:

>>  http://members.xoom.com/Spooky T/
>... If it doesn't show up
>right, anyone knowing what to do about it, please help.

 
 
 

clay baking question

Post by Annette Ha » Thu, 10 Jun 1999 04:00:00


lets try this. If this doesn't do it I givr up. Doesn't seem to be a
way to edit a posted message her.
http://members.xoom.com/Spooky_T
 Annette

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

 
 
 

clay baking question

Post by Helen Fleisch » Thu, 10 Jun 1999 04:00:00




Quote:

>> if this is the same person or not. Check out-
>>  http://members.xoom.com/Spooky T/
>>  Annette
>I do not know why the complete URL didn't show up highlighted. I
>checked on PCC and the above is exactly as it is posted there. I will
>type it again and see if it works this time. If it doesn't show up
>right, anyone knowing what to do about it, please help.
>http://members.xoom.com/Spooky T
>(I'll try it without the last /)

Hello Annette and all,
It's likely that the reason that T didn't get highlighted is that there
is a space between it and the rest of the URL. Most mail readers
interpret a space as the end of the URL.

Question for those making molds of complex items:

I have sculpted a detailed bas relief that I want to make a mold of, and
I have not been happy with the results using elasticlay. It doesn't seem
to get into fine detail well unless I bake it on the master, and I had a
disaster where it adhered to a master recently. I really don't want to
ruin this one, but it's too large and too detailed for me to want to
make a Super Sculpey mold. What other molding materials have people
tried? And what sort of release do you use with them? I'd like to try
RTV silicon, since that's what my husband uses to cast pewter. Is there
a particular consistency that people recommend? He uses wax masters, so
he doesn't usually bother with a mold release.

Also, any of you have preferences in casting materials, resins, etc?

I have one undercut area in the master that I'm going to fill in today,
then re-bake it, but other than that, it should be all positive draft
and since it's a bas relief, it could be a one part mold, if it's
flexible.


 Helen "Halla" Fleischer,
 Fantasy & Fiber Artist in Fairland, MD USA

 
 
 

clay baking question

Post by Fettero » Thu, 17 Jun 1999 04:00:00


*********

 julia...

   ...well, if you are planning on only using one model of barbie, you
      may have success in making a casting of the doll with some media
      that is resistant to heat damage, and then coating it with a release
      agent when you mold the parts to it. then you could remove them
      once out of the oven and glue/attach them to the real doll...

    ...then again, a heat gun used carefully might do the trick nicely...

 let us know how it goes,

 - rob  ::)

*********

<< Try searching Deja News using keywords "Battle Clad Barbie" for a fun thread
from a year or so ago.  I can't remember how Barbie turned out, though -
does anybody remember?

Quote:

>So, I've recently gotten interested in customizing barbies, and turning
>them into the action figures of my dreams.  Poly clay seems like the
>perfect material to make them little weapons, jewelry, masks, etc.  My
>question is, for things that are supposed to be molded to the body, how
>should I bake them? Ideally, I would bake the doll and clay so the shape
>wouldn't collapse, but I suspect the doll would melt.  Any ideas on how to
>keep the shape intact, without melting dolls? >>

*********
*********
 
 
 

clay baking question

Post by brum.. » Fri, 25 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Julia and Rob and others...you just have to check out Apoxie Sculpt,
Apoxie Clay and FIXIT. These synthetic clay products have a putty like
consistency, air-harden, are non-toxic, a super strong and durable, are
highly adhesive (they even bond polyclay items together!), are
waterproof, do not shrink, and can be finished with paints or tooled or
feathered. When you get used to using these unique products, you will
get results which were previously unobtainable!

Check out the web site at www.avesstudio.com or call 800-261-2837 to
order a trial size.

Have fun.....Chuck



Quote:
> *********

>  julia...

>    ...well, if you are planning on only using one model of barbie, you
>       may have success in making a casting of the doll with some media
>       that is resistant to heat damage, and then coating it with a
release
>       agent when you mold the parts to it. then you could remove them
>       once out of the oven and glue/attach them to the real doll...

>     ...then again, a heat gun used carefully might do the trick
nicely...

>  let us know how it goes,

>  - rob  ::)

> *********

> << Try searching Deja News using keywords "Battle Clad Barbie" for a
fun thread
> from a year or so ago.  I can't remember how Barbie turned out, though
-
> does anybody remember?


> >So, I've recently gotten interested in customizing barbies, and
turning
> >them into the action figures of my dreams.  Poly clay seems like the
> >perfect material to make them little weapons, jewelry, masks, etc.
My
> >question is, for things that are supposed to be molded to the body,
how
> >should I bake them? Ideally, I would bake the doll and clay so the
shape
> >wouldn't collapse, but I suspect the doll would melt.  Any ideas on
how to
> >keep the shape intact, without melting dolls? >>

> *********
> *********

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.